WatchTrump is threatening Iran with more sanctions — but whats left to

first_img Email Not even tanker attacks in the Middle East can boost price of oil June 24, 20198:00 AM EDT Filed under News Economy Trump is threatening Iran with more sanctions — but what’s left to target? Current sanctions have already sent the country spiralling into a deep recession Comment Twitter 3 Comments Oil climbs to a three-week high as Trump announces new sanctions against Iran Reddit Morecenter_img Facebook Saleha Mohsin and Ladane Nasseri Share this storyTrump is threatening Iran with more sanctions — but what’s left to target? Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Bloomberg News What to expect from oil prices after tougher U.S. sanctions against Iran Related Stories President Donald Trump is threatening Iran with additional sanctions on Monday, but there’s not much left for the U.S. to target because most of the Islamic Republic’s economy has been crippled by earlier penalties.The U.S. is already sanctioning significant sectors including oil, banks and steel, leaving smaller targets including certain exports and government officials. Trump could also hit Iran’s central bank with secondary sanctions, at the risk of hurting humanitarian trade.“The Trump administration has already hit most of Iran’s cash-earning exports and pushed the country into a deep recession this year,” said Peter Harrell, a fellow at the Center for New American Security, a Washington-based research group. “A lot of exports to Iran have dried up because of risk aversion and all the banking sanctions.” Oil climbs to a three-week high as Trump announces new sanctions against Iran Gold is still gaining today, bringing prices near the highest level since 2013 with bulls ‘back in control’ Russia says new U.S. sanctions on Iran are illegal Trump announced plans for major sanctions on Saturday, following his abrupt cancellation of planned air strikes against the Islamic Republic for shooting down a U.S. Navy drone on Thursday.More than 80 per cent of Iran’s economy is under sanction today, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday before heading to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to rally a front against Iran. The new sanctions “will be a further effort to ensure that their capacity not only to grow their economy but to evade sanctions becomes more and more difficult,” Pompeo said.Iran’s Foreign Ministry said the new penalties won’t force the country to negotiate or capitulate.“Are there any other sanctions left for the U.S. to impose on Iran?” ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said Monday, according to the official Islamic Republic News Agency. The Trump administration “knows full well that if pressure and sanctions were the answer, they would have yielded results much earlier.”Iran’s navy chief warned earlier that other drones would be downed if U.S. intrusions into Iranian airspace continue. The U.S. says the aircraft was in international airspace.The U.S. has applied sanctions to nearly 1,000 Iranian entities, including banks, individuals, ships and aircraft. In May, the Trump administration prohibited the purchase of Iranian iron, steel, aluminum and copper.The U.S. has also revoked waivers that had allowed eight countries including India and China to import Iranian oil despite American sanctions. Trump seeks to drive Iranian oil exports to zero to force Tehran to abandon support for militant groups in the Middle East and renegotiate the 2015 nuclear accord the U.S. quit a year ago. Observed crude flows from Iran dropped to 190,000 barrels a day in the first half of June, less than 10 per cent of the volume shipped in early 2018.Forecasts from earlier this year show Iran’s GDP set to contract 6 per cent this year after declining 4 per cent in 2018.Exceptions to U.S. sanctions on Iranian oil sales will be made for humanitarian purchases such as for food and medicine, though it’s not clear how those would be determined or approved.The U.S. Treasury Department has also sanctioned Iran’s central bank governor and another senior official in the bank for allegedly providing support for terrorist activities.‘More Desperate’The moves so far haven’t been enough for at least one Republican lawmaker. Representative Michael McCaul of Texas, the top GOP member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, on Sunday egged on the Trump administration’s efforts.“We want them to be more desperate,” McCaul said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” news program. “We want them to have their economy crippled” so Iranian leaders will negotiate, he said.But with little left to sanction, added punishments would be mostly symbolic and “risk Iran escalating in retaliation,” Harrell said.Iranian authorities have already said new sanctions show that Trump’s call for negotiations — repeated over the weekend — was hollow. On Monday, President Hassan Rouhani’s adviser Hesameddin Ashena suggested the U.S. needs to offer incentives to Iran if it wants concessions.Bloomberg.com Join the conversation →last_img read more

US Most Affordable BEVs Per Mile Of Range Comparison

Nissan Confirms “Longer-Range Version” Of LEAF Coming In The Future The king of both comparisons is the Chevrolet Bolt EV ($158/mile), although the Tesla Model 3 Long Range (RWD) almost matched the Bolt EV at $162/mile.Models that are not long-range due to smaller battery capacity got worse marks – Nissan LEAF with 40 kWh battery (2/3 of Bolt EV) is above $200/mile.We are very interested in the Hyundai Kona Electric, which can drive up to 258 miles (EPA) – 20 miles more than the Bolt EV, but U.S. pricing isn’t available yet, so we can’t toss it in the mix.The fanciest of BEVs, high-end or ultra-short-range, can cost you $450-$500 per mile of range.BEVs price (MSRP + DST) per mile of EPA range comparison – some models estimated Today’s low is approximately $160 per mile of range.Decreasing battery prices and competition on the all-electric car market leads to a more and more attractive ratio of price (MSRP + destination charge) per mile of EPA range.Data coming from our Compare EVs card indicates that today’s benchmark for a long-range BEVs is at around $160 per mile (before the federal tax credit is applied and below $130 per mile after the federal tax credit).See Also Which Electric Cars Have The Longest Range For 2018? Here’s The Estimated Range Of Tesla Model S, 3 & X At Highway Speeds Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 17, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

Tesla TSLA stock tumbles on news that the SEC reportedly sues Elon

While Elon Musk’s attempt to take Tesla private is long gone, it is still haunting the CEO and now his investors are feeling the consequences.Tesla’s (TSLA) stock tumbled on the news that the SEC is reportedly suing Musk. more…The post Tesla (TSLA) stock tumbles on news that the SEC reportedly sues Elon Musk appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forward

Here are some of the craziest electric vehicles at Paris Motor Show

That’s not a swipe at your buying power, it’s a matter of automakers loving to unveil wacky electric vehicles that they rarely if ever bring to productionThere were a bunch of those vehicles at the Paris Motor Show this week. Here are some of them. more…The post Here are some of the craziest electric vehicles at Paris Motor Show that you’ll never be able to buy appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forward

A Free Model 3 Watch How This Tesla Pays For Itself

first_imgSource: YouTube …and its insurance!The Tesla Model 3, by all accounts, is a pretty great car. The only thing that could make it better — outside of it constantly improving through software updates, which already happens — is if it could be free. Well, if you are willing to make certain sacrifices and take some risks, that is apparently possible.More about Tesla and Turo A Firsthand Account About Renting Out An EV On Turo Learn All About These Tesla Owners’ Epic Las Vegas Road Trip Source: Electric Vehicle Newscenter_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 29, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Our proof is the video above. In it, our friend Sean Mitchell interviews a Model 3 owner and former co-worker, Carissa, about her experience with her car over the past six months and 20,000 miles. Already an interesting watch as she details her ownership experience from standing in line to her day-to-day usage and impressions, our ears could hardly believe her results from offering the mid-size sedan on Turo, a car-sharing platform.Her car, which, by the way, is named Death Star and has the personalized plate to prove it, finds itself in the loving embrace of strangers for seven to ten days a month. By making that sacrifice, it brings in enough money to not only make the payments but also cover the insurance costs. Turns out that Carissa hasn’t actually had to make a payment since it first arrived. How awesome is that?Now, there are some caveats to keep in mind about placing your car with a sharing service, and our interviewee has no qualms about sharing the secrets of her success. Pricing, we learn, is important, as is good photos. She also shares that all four of her wheels have been scraped up from less-than-professional parking.For some, the trade-off may be too much, but we suspect other owners, especially those who live in areas where a sighting of the “affordable” Tesla may be less than a common occurrence, this could be a great arrangement. And who knows, like Carissa’s car, your pride and joy could be used to set a world record and achieve fame and glory!Video Description via Sean Mitchell on YouTube:6 months of Model 3 ownership, 20,000 miles (32,300 km) This 26-Year Old Got Six Tesla Vehicles In 18 Monthslast_img read more

GM partners with EVgo ChargePoint and Greenlots to improve its EV charging

first_imgGM announced today that it is partnering with EVgo, ChargePoint and Greenlots, three of the biggest charging networks in the US, in order to improve its electric vehicle charging solution for customers. more…The post GM partners with EVgo, ChargePoint and Greenlots to improve its EV charging solution appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Tesla Model 3 Performance On Track With Ferrari BMW Nio Nissan MBAMG

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 1, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 With Track Mode Toasts Tires: Incredible Drone Footage Watch Tesla Model 3 Performance Race Chevy Corvette With Slicks This is no drag race, since the Tesla Model 3 Performance has praiseworthy track chops.The above video is just a short teaser of the real deal, which we’ve embedded below. This Tesla Model 3 Performance with Track Mode joins some tough competition in Shanghai, China. For years, we’ve shared a multitude of videos showing off the ludicrous acceleration of the Tesla Model S and X. While the videos were hugely popular, there were always complaints that the cars were only showcased driving in a straight line.Fast forward to today and the Model 3 Performance with Track Mode fills that void for Tesla.More Tesla Model 3 Performance Track Mode Content: Tesla Model 3 Performance Track Mode Rushes Past Ferrari And Alfa Romeo The Model 3 has proven that it can handle the twisty track, along with having some pretty impressive acceleration. Dial it up a notch with the Performance variant and it’s considerably better. Mix in a little Track Mode and we’ve got ourselves a car that can hang with the big boys.Scroll down to enjoy the full video. Then, share your thoughts in the comment section below.Video Description via JayinShanghai on YouTube:Tesla Model 3 Performance at Goldenport Park Circuit, Beijing. 100m Drag Race and Time Trial PREVIEW‪Tesla Model 3 Performance at Goldenport Park Circuit, Beijing with track mode enabled. 100m Drag Race and Time Trial. Racing against Ferrari 488 GTB, BMW M3, Nissan GT-R, Mercedes-AMG C63, NIO ES8, BYD唐DM. Preview Video posted on 懂车帝APP #TeslaChina #Tesla #Model3Performance.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Video Description:Tesla Model 3 Performance v Ferrari 488 GTB v BMW M3 v Nissan GTR v Mercedes-AMG C63 v NIO ES8 China‪Tesla Model 3 Performance at Goldenport Park Circuit, Beijing, China with track mode enabled. 100m Drag Race and Time Trial. Racing against Ferrari 488 GTB, BMW M3, Nissan GT-R, Mercedes-AMG C63, NIO ES8, BYD唐DM. Video posted on 懂车帝APP #TeslaChina #Tesla #Model3Performancelast_img read more

How To Buy A New Tesla Model 3 For Just 26250

first_imgNow that’s a heck of a deal right there.With the announcement of the $35,000 Tesla Model 3, the electric automaker rocked the world a bit. However, what if we told you that you can buy a Model 3 for a lot less than $35,000.No, we’re not talking used, but rather a brand new Model 3.More Tesla News You see, even though the federal tax credit of $7,500 is down to just $3,750 for Tesla (and Chevrolet), state credits for EV purchases are still fully in place. For example, in California, an electric car buyer gets a $2,500 rebate. So, in California, the after-credit price of the Model 3 would be just $28,750 (plus destination). That’s an extremely low price for a Tesla electric car, but it drops even lower in some states.What Incentives Do I Qualify For By Buying An Electric Vehicle?We should point out that these EV incentives aren’t limited to just Tesla or the Model 3. Any pure electric car qualifies equally at the state level.But $26,250. How’s that possible? Well, if you reside in Colorado, the state offers a $5,000 cash rebate. This is not tied to your tax liability at all, so all buyers qualify.Time to run the numbers. Starting with the base price of $35,000, subtract the $5,000 Colorado state rebate and it drops down to $30,000. Minus the $3,750 federal tax credit (provided you have the tax liability to qualify for that amount) and there’s your $26,250 brand new Tesla Model 3. Sure seems like a bargain to us for an electric car with a range of 220 miles and a 0 to 60 MPH time of 5.6 seconds. Or, you could buy a well-equipped Toyota Corolla instead (sarcasm intended).We suggest you check out what your state offers in incentives for electric cars and see if the Model 3 (or any other EV) meets your needs. Many of these incentives won’t last long, so you surely don’t want to miss out on a deal by waiting it out. Source: Electric Vehicle News The $35,000 Tesla Model 3 Announcement Recap Tesla Launches Base Model 3: Here’s The Price UPDATE: Longest Range Electric Cars For Your Money: Cheap EVs That Go Far Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 3, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Elon Musk hints at Tesla Pickup truck towing capacity crushing the competition

first_imgTesla’s electric pickup truck is set to be the next vehicle to be unveiled by the automaker and they have been teasing it over the last year.Now, CEO Elon Musk hints at the towing capacity crushing the competition. more…The post Elon Musk hints at Tesla Pickup truck towing capacity crushing the competition appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Wednesdays Green Deals Ryobi Electric TrimmerBlower Kit 79 Sense Energy Monitor 249

first_imgHome Depot offers the Ryobi ONE+ 18V String Trimmer and Blower Kit for $79 shipped. Originally $109, we’ve seen it more recently around $100. Today’s deal is $1 less than our previous mention. With spring just around the corner, going for Ryobi’s electric trimmer and blower bundle will be a great tool for keeping your landscaping clean. Best of all? Not fumes, gas or oil. Rated 4.5/5 stars. More deals below. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Wednesday’s Green Deals: Ryobi Electric Trimmer/Blower Kit $79, Sense Energy Monitor $249, more appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

Pearces young pretenders get reality check from Poland

first_imgStuart Pearce This article is more than 11 years old Share on Facebook Poland England Share on Messenger news This article is more than 11 years old Pearce’s young pretenders get reality check from Poland Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Topics Share via Email Stuart James at Molineux Soccercenter_img Share via Email Shares00 Share on LinkedIn Friendlies Share on Pinterest Soccer First published on Tue 25 Mar 2008 20.54 EDT Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook @StuartJamesGNM Tue 25 Mar 2008 20.54 EDT Strength in depth is not something that Fabio Capello enjoys and the same may be true of England at Under-21 level after this disappointing performance against a competitive Poland side. England extended their unbeaten run to nine matches, although there was little else to comfort Stuart Pearce on a night when the manager had hoped to discover fresh talent in readiness for the European Championship finals in Sweden next year.Jamie O’Hara’s debut included promising touches and Adam Johnson’s sinuous runs on the left offered a threat but it says everything about the paucity of chances that it took a Mexican wave to get a good crowd on their feet. Well-organised and dangerous on the counter-attack, Poland exposed the understandable lack of cohesion in a callow England side that will surely be much stronger come September’s fixture against Portugal.That final Group Three qualifying match offers England a chance to secure their place in the play-offs, with only a point required to progress. Gabriel Agbonlahor, James Milner and Tom Huddlestone would all expect to return for the fixture, with those offered a rare start here doing little to convince they merit a place in the starting XI. Indeed, it did not need Pearce to point out the players had enjoyed only one day together on the training ground. “It was a difficult game for us,” admitted the manager. “We didn’t do enough to win the game and a draw was a fair result. We knew we were in for a tough game but that’s what we needed. It will be a good exercise in the long term, maybe not tonight or tomorrow. But I have learnt enough out of the performance to make it a worthwhile exercise. It will stand us in good stead for the European Championship next year – which I think we can win.” Providing those on the periphery with a chance to gain experience had been Pearce’s primary motivation when he selected this under-strength team. The manager, who heads to Paris this morning to join Capello and the rest of the England coaching staff , admitted that a few of his players may have been “nervous” last night, although Fraizer Campbell, coming on as a second-half substitute, was not among them. “I was quite impressed with him,” added Pearce. The Manchester United player, who has scored 13 goals while on loan at Hull City this season, came closest to a breakthrough after Przemyslaw Tyton fumbled at his feet. The Poland goalkeeper had earlier denied Luke Moore after the forward pounced on his failure to hold on to Craig Gardner’s free-kick. He also produced a smart save to repel Cameron Jerome’s curling shot.England were hardly laying siege to the visitors’ goal, however, and there were moments of consternation to endure at the opposite end. Manchester City’s Joe Hart had to be alert to thwart Szymon Pawlowski after the Pole cut inside Michael Mancienne and the goalkeeper’s replacement, Tom Heaton – one of five players to win a first Under-21 cap – was also called upon when he tipped Radoslaw Majewski’s sharp shot over the bar. Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Nadals feats on clay leave Federer with much to do before French

first_imgRoger Federer Read more Share on WhatsApp Share via Email Support The Guardian Share on Facebook Since you’re here… Tennis Share on Twitter Higueras is clearly attempting to get Federer to the net more. He made 28 net approaches, although only about half were successful, principally because he often chose to go in on approach shots that lacked the necessary depth, and the Spaniard pinged the ball past him. Both players, despite their continued dominance in the rankings, have had their confidence shaken in recent times. Nadal was without a title since he won in Stuttgart last summer, while Federer, having lost in the semi-finals of the Australian Open against Serbia’s Novak Djokovic, was within two points of losing to a Spanish qualifier in his opening match here.Their quality of play in the opening set was patchy, while Nadal’s level of intensity in the second dropped alarmingly. At one stage Federer had won three times as many points, including eight in succession as he went 4-0 up, only for Nadal to rediscover himself with a vengeance and to reel off 11 successive points of his own. It left Federer clutching at straws, ones that seem unlikely to make him winning bricks when the French Open begins in four weeks. Share on Twitter The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Share via Email Sun 27 Apr 2008 20.07 EDT Share on Pinterest Share on Messenger Tennis First published on Sun 27 Apr 2008 20.07 EDT Nadal’s feats on clay leave Federer with much to do before French Open Rafael Nadal Shares00 Share on Facebook Stephen Bierley in Monte Carlo … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Rafael Nadal hits his way to his fourth consecutive Monte Carlo title. Photograph: M Steele/Getty The possibility of Roger Federer ever winning the French Open, and thereby becoming only the sixth player in the game’s long history to capture all four grand slam tournaments, continues to look a forlorn one as long as Rafael Nadal’s suspect knees hold together. The 21-year-old Spaniard defeated the Swiss world No1 yesterday for the seventh time in their eight meetings on clay, winning 7-5, 7-5 to take his fourth successive Monte Carlo title, thereby equalling the record of New Zealand’s Anthony Wilding that was set before the first world war.Federer had more chances than usual, and this seemed enough to convince him that he is getting ever closer to solving the Nadal clay-court conundrum. He twice broke the young Spaniard’s serve in the opening set, and then held a 4-0 lead in the second. Yet even then he could not nail his nemesis.His one victory on the surface came last year in the Hamburg Master Series final, but the courts and conditions in the German city are atypical, bearing little resemblance to here, Rome, or Roland Garros, where Nadal holds sway.Federer has no other option other than to talk up his chances of ultimately getting the better of the world No2 on clay, as he did after this defeat, their 15th meeting on all surfaces, and Nadal’s ninth victory. It is only on the All England Club’s grass, as well as indoors, that Nadal has yet to get the better of him, and he was preciously close to ending Federer’s Wimbledon dominance in last year’s final. “I pushed Rafa today, and have the feeling I can beat him if I play the right way,” said Federer, who has lost the last three finals here against the Spaniard, as well as the 2006 and 2007 French Open finals. “Last year I felt like I was completely out of the match from the start. So today was better.” Federer, who has been without a coach since parting with the Australian Tony Roche just under a year ago, has begun working with Spain’s US-based José Higueras, who coached both Michael Chang and Jim Courier to the French Open title. “We haven’t spent much time on the practice courts,” said Federer. “It has been more of a talking experience.” Topics Reuse this content Share on LinkedInlast_img read more

Capello tackles the imperfections of a perfect night

first_img Twitter Topics Share on Facebook | Pick Facebook The best thing about the triumph was its defects. A relentless Fabio Capello will be happy in the knowledge that plenty of work is still needed, with all the improvement that implies. This 4-1 defeat of Croatia was not a night when everything dropped serendipitously into place.Imperfections jutted out and a supporter would have been fatalistic if told that David James would get into trouble at crosses, that Ashley Cole would stagger as Darijo Srna and others drove at him, that Joe Cole would drop out of view and that Wayne Rooney’s unreflecting desire to help would see him concede a foul near England’s penalty area.Several of the faults were fleeting, but some proved slower to fade. The irreproachable factor was England’s attitude. There were spells when the competitiveness, for example, lay in the determination of Rio Ferdinand and John Terry to impose their will. All over the pitch there was an insistence on having the last word. Capello stresses that his players have much to lose. “I just say to the players that it is their second cap,” he explained. Nothing that happened before the qualifiers with Andorra and, now, Croatia is deemed to matter.A few members of the opposition on Wednesday cannot count on being in the first team for their clubs, yet still this generation had extended the sequence of unbeaten qualifiers at the Maksimir Stadium that began in 1994. England set about showing Slaven Bilic’s side that those inner resources were exhausted.His team was powerless to stop Theo Walcott, whose shrewd elevation to the first team must now have brought complete trust in Capello’s judgment. The hat-trick contained ruthless finishing that was more of a surprise than the speed on the right that so unsettled Danijel Pranjic, a full-back who wants to overlap.Walcott himself will henceforth be shadowed by his own celebrity. “I know,” agreed an amused Capello. “We have created a problem for Arsenal, not for me. Theo is young with a good future, but we have to help him. At this moment when all the people in newspapers and television are talking about the team we have to keep our feet on the ground.”He draws a parallel with his confidence in Raúl during his first stint as Real Madrid manager, in 1996. Like Walcott now, the Spaniard was then 19, but Capello is sure that the challenge presented to the Arsenal player is of a higher order. “The national team is different,” he said. “If you decide to put one of the young players in the national team it is sometimes a worry for the player, not for the manager. This time it was good.” It is heartening for Capello that Walcott should be under the control of Arsène Wenger.On Wednesday, the teenager was edgy at the outset but did not have his anxieties compounded by an intimidatory atmosphere. The fire in the hearts of the crowd had been banked in comparison with the emotional conflagration when England were last at the stadium, for the 2-0 loss in 2006. While the atmosphere was exciting, it was not intimidatory. With 20 minutes gone Srna was clapping his hands and imploring supporters to increase the volume. The match was goalless then, but Croatia sensed trouble ahead. They were the ones with the brittle temperament.England were only 1-0 in front when Robert Kovac was dismissed for the reckless smashing of an elbow into the head of Joe Cole, but the physicality was the expression of a panic already entrenched in Croatian ranks. There was a calm to Capello’s team. It registered in England’s hogging of 61% of the possession. The side is not supreme because of one result and there will be setbacks to come, but maybe Capello will outdo his predecessors by getting the players to perform as reliably as they do for their clubs.The manager reports that there have been discussions daily with the players during training. “Usually [with clubs] I am trying to change something over one month,” he said. “I tried to change something with England over 10 days. I saw something this evening.”Confidence, this was the problem. If a player is good for his club then he has to prepare the same way for the national team. I said that we would play better away from Wembley. I hope this game will help the national team and also we need the help of the supporters.”An outcome of Wednesday’s sort strengthens Capello’s hand. How, for example, can the injured Steven Gerrard assume after this that he will be reinstated for the next World Cup qualifier, against Kazakhstan at Wembley on October 11? The manager, too, takes nothing for granted. As with so many of the dominant figures in his profession, he was already detaching himself from an outstanding win while everyone else wanted to cling to it.How he would have hated to hear the talk start of England’s chances at the 2010 World Cup. His own frame of mind is unyielding in its practicality. “For me,” Capello said, “there is only the result. We have six points, like Ukraine.” He is probably in earnest when he promises that everyone is forever on trial. “When I choose the squad I pick the best player at that moment,” Capello insisted. It might have been footballers fearing for their own futures who scared the wits out of Croatia. Share on Facebook Doctoroncall Share on Twitter 12 Sep 2008 10:31 Shares00 Twitter Share Report stealthbanana Threads collapsed terryphelan Reply England Report | Pick Comments 66 Since you’re here… Share on Twitter newest Reply Share on Twitter Reply | Pick Twitter Share Reply bmurphy – I agree, the fundamental reason England have been so lacking in recent years is not strictly through a lack of top players, but more the lack of a single minded manager able to get his message across in the limited time given. Don Fabio has a force of personality and charisma that obviously makes highly paid star players sit up and listen. However great a technical coach Second Choice Steve may have been, or man manager Sven was, or motivator Keegan was, none seemed able to get the desired message through to the players for more than the odd one off game.As it is only one game it easy to be cynical and expect England to fall back into old habits, but Capellos reputation and track record means that he is unlikely to let this happen. Not to say that we will go on to dominate in all games like we did on Wednesday, but that Capello will not be satisfied until his mission is complete.It’ll be interesting to see what he does when Gerrard comes back into contention. He has already said that he will pick players on club form or from evidence of training, so it’s hard to second guess him at this stage. But my best guess is that he’ll stick him in the position Joe Cole played the past couple of games. It’s obvious to everyone that Gerrard is wasted there, and he obviously hates it (fair enough methinks) but if Capello feels it will benefit the team then the players own personal preference for where he plays will not come into it. It’s harsh on Frank Lampard, but he should be dropped to make way for Gerrard. If you analyse who is the better it is a no-brainer really. Bluenose00 – I agree with you. Croatia were not that good – England were shocking under McClaren, who was out of his depth from the off. It was obvious he could never communicate the authority and confidence in tactics and organization that are fundamental at international level. However, beating a team of their ability 4-1 at home is an impressive result.The great thing about Capello is that he is so adaptable. He’s won the Spanish title in two different eras with Real Madrid and the Italian title loads of times with three different teams, again in completely different eras.This suggests that he is capable of adjusting tactics and organization to suit different players and team dynamics. He is already addressing England’s (and any team’s) fundamental failing – giving the ball away. England have been in possession of the ball more than their opponents in every match played under Capello. This was the best thing about the win in Zagreb – not the score, but the fact that the Croats couldn’t get the ball off them. Under McClaren England just gave them the ball (e.g. the third Croatia goal at Wembley).I’m convinced that England’s failings for a very long time have been down to the limitations of the managers, very few of whom have won anything significant. The only exceptions – Eriksson, Venables, Robson – were the managers who got the best out of the players. Capello is better than these three by a country mile.There’s no guarantee that Capello’s England will win anything, but if he’s given a few years, it’s a pretty good bet that there’ll be an improvement on Eriksson’s fairly OK record of three consecutive quarter finals. Reply Share on Twitter Report Order by oldest | Pick 12 Sep 2008 16:43 Muntzer 3 Share on Facebook comments (66)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Share on Twitter expanded | Pick Share on Facebook sorry am in danger of becoming like marsman with beckham BUT F**KINGHELL CAN WE STOP THE GERRARD WORSHIP!statements like this are TOTAL SH!T -“It’s harsh on Frank Lampard, but he should be dropped to make way for Gerrard. If you analyse who is the better it is a no-brainer really.”SOMEONE PLEASE TELL ME WHAT GERRARD HAS DONE TO JUSTIFY HIS PLACE?do we have point out AGAIN his wasteful possession play, his lack of discipline and tactics, his glory balls when theres no need for them etcetc?SHUT THE F**K UP!when gerrard said he’d suffered from being “adaptable” which is why he’d played in his favoured position 6 times out of 80 or whatever it was he was, he’s missing the point! even rafa doesnt trust him to play in the middle of the park often because of the above reasons!grow up! drop the “he plays for my club so thats all that matters!” mentality.personally i wdnt play either of them!F**K! 3 Loading comments… Trouble loading? Email (optional) Share via Email 0 1 Where is marsman? Share on Twitter miroljub posts”The memories of the late 1980s must stay fresh in many minds.”Indeed they do. We used to joke we knew England were playing because Robson was being stretchered off.The best team England had always evolved out of injuries and suspensions.Compared to the present? False dawns over 40 years will be many and we’ve seen them all.England the other night were enjoyed. They didn’t look ”inept.” They didn’t look ”hapless.” They were watchable.The second Walcott goal even looked as if it had been created at a moment in this century. Ball to feet in and around the penalty area. A modern goal.England the other night looked like a team playing football. With Beckham and Motson and Hansen and Shearer and that crowd it had always been a version of rugby. Cross. Free kick. Percentages. A 1950s rugby mindset applied to controlling how football is played.England against Croatia played football with a football mindset. Whether the team can achieve the fluidity and intelligence we see from major teams in tournaments is another matter.The best we can say about the other night is that we might have become a football playing country. 12 Sep 2008 17:20 Share on Twitter Share Report There should be no danger of England returning to their days of misplaced arrogance now Fabio Capello is in charge Reply Twitter Report 12 Sep 2008 18:15 blogposts | Pick 0 1 0 1 Facebook Facebook @DoctoroncallYou mean it’s the case of a painfully hopeless English romantics meet a highly skilled but unemotional Italian pragmatist?Could the Italian pragmatist be someone who looks like Prince Charles’ s father Prince Phillip who, then the duke, played squash on the night his son was born, so trying to insult some backbone for his role as king? | Pick Report 12 Sep 2008 10:49 Apologies if this has been mentioned before but for me the biggest problem on Wed was despite England dominating possession and giving very little away David James still managed to look extremely dodgy. Its a shame as for the past few years he’s been consistently one of the best keepers in the Prem but has never looked comfortable at international level. Joe Hart’s the future, with Kazakhstan and Belarus coming up now’s the time to put him in. Report Facebook Share on Twitter Reply Report Facebook Twitter 12 Sep 2008 18:28 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook Miro,Pragamatism has never been a true virtue in English football, perhaps now with Capello as manager things can move forward… step by step. Doctoroncall Fabio Capello 0 1 Share on Facebook Miro,I wouldn’t call Reap a romantic! We have sufferred much because of his limited theories thanks to the FA championing his cause. I can see an “unemotional Italian pragmatist” will get the best out of the squad and we can see the full potential of it, whatever that maybe, even Terry may learn a thing or two! oldest | Pick I just never thought Croatia were *that* good. They beat us twice us in fairly fortunate circumstances in a qualifying campaign that they played above their true calibre when we were truly terrible. They are back down to earth now. Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Share 0 1 Am not getting carried away – but this was a very significant performance for the reason that England, playing 4-4-2, dominated possession (61%) against a technically gifted and decent side. I suspect they shaded possession even when Croatia had 11 men. In many previous great results – this was not the case: 5-1 against Germany – fantastic, incisive counter-attacking performance but a low quality Germany had the ball: 4-1 against Holland – Holland had far more of the ball than us, had more chances than us. 1-0 against Argentina – I think we had 25% of possession and spent the last 30 mins with 11 men in our half. My point is England have always been capable of stunning one-off performances because they always tend to pose a goal-threat and can defend a lead – but Wednesday night was a performance much more likely to produce scorelines like that on a regular basis. The 4-1 scoreline was not a reflection of a particularly high chance-conversion rate – but rather a reflection of complete dominance and control. The last time we saw that was fleetingly under Hoddle (Rome 1997 when we actually kept the ball off Italy), when we played 5 in midfield – and then you have to go back to Italia 90.In the past we have preferred to play top sides without the ball – relying on pace on the counter and set pieces – and a degree of luck as we defend deeper and deeper as the game progresses. This has brought us some success – but it is an approach that will always be exposed as limited – particularly in hot summer tournaments (Brazil 2002 the best example) because it is exhausting. Wednesday really was something different: we kept the ball, played high up the pitch (the two are not un-related) – and did it with 4-at-the-back and two-up-front – two things that are natural to England but which, in the past, have meant England lose the midfield – and possession. All-in-all, England’s best performance since an unlucky 1-1 over 120 mins against a top-notch West Germany – way back when in 1990. I agree that as yet we do not have a core set of players that are quite the equal of Shilton, Walker, Pearce, Gascoigne, Platt, Lineker, Waddle, Beardsley – but Ferdinand (superb on Weds), Lampard, Gerrard, Cole, Rooney, Walcott, maybe still Owen – are not too far short and at last have a manager and a shape. If we could just get a keeper… miroljub Share on Twitter Twitter | Pick 12 Sep 2008 15:55 Share on Facebook Share Share on Twitter Kevin McCarra Report Share on Facebook 0 1 100 Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 12 Sep 2008 13:52 England were great – but by their standards Croatia were really poor. Walcott’s last finish was beautiful but the goalie should have done better for the first two. Good luck England, but don’t get drunk on one result. There’s no way England would have won 4-1 if Croatia were playing well, 10 men or not. Strangely Croatia were England for the night – they looked overcooked, overhyped and lethargic. 0 1 Don’t really know how the team played – by the time I heard that Setanta were screening the highlights free, It was too late! They sounded good on radio 5 though.The England team belongs to us. No? Why can’t we even watch the highlights for free? I wouldn’t pay Setanta money to watch my national side, even if I could afford it. If this continues I might just lose interest altogether and I’m probably not the only one. How are my two little nephews going to develop an interest in a sport that can’t be seen?I’m not a cynic, I’m just miserable! No, actually I am a cynic, but not as cynical as football! Facebook 1 Share Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Reply | Pick collapsed 12 Sep 2008 18:29 Twitter Report sleepwalker Reply Bluenose00 Share on Facebook Reply 0 1 Report Facebook Share on Twitter 0 1 Report Report 12 Sep 2008 16:09 50 0 1 Share on Twitter Reply 12 Sep 2008 18:14 2 Share @plectrum’Miro – you’re a miserable old cynic :)’Yes, I am. But even being a miserable old cynic, I still can’t believe that you said that for no other reason but because I had written that England lack a younger and quicker left center-back. 0 1 12 Sep 2008 17:07 12 Sep 2008 18:20 Probably the first measured article I’ve read about the game, yet I still feel somewhat sickly. England footie journos eh – the most two-faced of all. After all the furrowed brows and exaserbation following the win (yes you won!) against Andorra, the coverage of England’s EPIC (that was printed somewhere) battle in the last couple of days really has taken the biscuit. The Times online is like a bloody shrine to theo walcott.sums it all up reallywww.youtube.com/watch?v=zUfqp7e7mBICan’t wait until this all blows up in your faces though, and after failure to get anywhere in the world cup we get the same old soul-searching guff on the following topics1. Number of foreigners in the english game2. The state of the english game because of the above3. A hate figure (let me see, last time it was lampard / Sven, before that Rooney, before that was beckham, so we’ll go for , em, David James – too easy?)4. The ‘silly johnny foreigner manager’ who didn’t know what he was doing (probably written by guest columnist ‘Arry Redknapp or Kevin Nolan…)On a separate note, I am delighted that England’s midfield did perform well and notably without Steven Gerrard. His whinging comments about being the victim of his own ‘versatility’ is a true glimpse of the man’s petulance….and I’m a liverpool fan. 1 Share Yeah, it was a visually impressive, awe-inspiring, memorable and astonishing England performance, and a hair-raising, heart-stirring, breathtaking and collosal England win.From valley to peak in less than 100 minutes!Call me a miserable old cynic what, to an extent, I am, but I can’t resist to remind you on the results and events that occured prior and after England’s not less impressive 4-1 win against Yugoslavia, in the Euro 1996 decisive qualifying match, played in Belgrade, on November 11, 1987.The English journalists, I was their host on behalf of the Yugoslavian FA (I believe that David Lacey was there), were about 10 times more critical towards Bobby Robson, his selection and team tactics, than the nowadays journos have ever been towards Fabio Capello. That made Bobby so furious, that after the triumph which not many expected, he used the post-match press-conference for just one purpose: to tell them how much he ‘admired’ their knowledge and work.On that rainy evening, the winning England team was: Shilton – Stevens, Butcher, Adams, Sansom – Steven, Robson (Reid 76′), Webb (Hoddle 80′), Barnes – Lineker, Beardsly.During the following eight months, until June 18, 1988, this England team were playing a total of 9 matches, including three at the 1988 Euro finals. The record: 2 wins, 4 draws, 3 defeats. A goal-score: 7-10. Their appearance at the European Championship was a pure disaster.I think that the current England team is nowhere near as strong as the England team in 1988. It lacks not only a decent goalkeeper, a reliable right back, a younger and quicker left center-back, one or two both hard-working and creative midfielders, but also the better alternatives to the players we saw at Zegreb. In front of Capello is extremely hard work to do, much harder than it maybe looks after the defeat of the over-confident and depleted 10-man Croatian side.The memories of the late 1980s must stay fresh in many minds. PatrickTreacy Share on Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Facebook Facebook Thu 11 Sep 2008 19.05 EDT 12 Sep 2008 14:22 Twitter Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Reply Share on Twitter Reply Share on Twitter Show 25 Reply Support The Guardiancenter_img 0 1 Share on Facebook Pricey Share Eh, it was only two days ago that everyone was slating this team and the manager.It is strange how we always swing from peaks to troughs in our perceptions, never maintaining a constant, common-sensical view.A quick glance at economic models shows that volatility is not good for long term growth. What you want is slow, steady measured growth over time, not massive gains followed by wrenching losses.After Andorra were England a terrible team with a poor manager? No. After Croatia are England the best team in the world with the best manager? No.The reality is that England has a pool of talented players, who are capeable of competing at the higher levels of international football.This group of players is now being led by an astute manager who is changing things slowly.Slow, incremental improvement, helped on Wednesday by a self imploding Croatia team. Share Share | Pick Twitter Report Report | Pick 12 Sep 2008 18:33 Share on Facebook Share 0 1 Report 25 Reply Share on Twitter World Cup Share on Twitter Twitter | Pick Share on Twitter Enough already no? I mean, it was Croatia the team beat!! Good performance, long time ago since something like this, yada yada yada. Ok, let’s hope they do it again and move on!!!I can’t believe I am witnessing people setting themselves up for a huge disappointment if the team fail to perform in the near future.Aaaaaaah, never mind give me another beer!! World Champions, World Champions!! Take it and Deal with that Spain!! Reply I believe that England need to cultivate a sense of proportion, lost due hype surrounding the PL. It is a sense of proportion that maintains sanity, and keeps the imagination from getting caught in a psychotic corner of thought and action. Reply Share Reply Capello tackles the imperfections of a perfect night Facebook Twitter Facebook 0 1 Facebook whos’ next? is it belarus?HOLY F**K! if we beat them too then we’re gonna win the world cup!also read some balls earlier about gerrard being advocated for right back…what sh1t..just stop!this cd only be suggested by-a. a liverpool fan.b. someone who HAS TO HAVE gerrard on the team sheet for ANY reason – hey! lets play him in goal!c. someone who clearly knows very little about tactics and discipline – just like gerrard. 0 1 0 1 Facebook Twitter Share Reply Facebook 0 1 Sportblog miroljub | Pick Twitter Peters16 0 1 Share on Facebook Report Report Report Share on Facebook England 12 Sep 2008 16:50 Close report comment form 0 1 Twitter Twitter MwepuLlunga 12 Sep 2008 18:07 suitone Share on Facebook Share on Facebook 2 | Pick | Pick Share KeithSimmonds 12 Sep 2008 17:51 McEvoy 0 1 Facebook miroljub Share Share on Facebook 12 Sep 2008 15:38 Report Report 0 1 Reply cavelier5 Facebook Share KeithSimmonds Report Twitter miroljub | Pick Reply Miro – you’re a miserable old cynic 🙂 | Pick | Pick Share 12 Sep 2008 18:16 0 1 Share on Facebook | Pick Facebook Report Beeswaxbob Share Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Twitter bmurphy | Pick | Pick plectrum Report Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Reply unthreaded Share Sportblog People really need to get away from hailing the playing abilities of individuals and concentrate more on how those abilities will affect the system of playing that Capello wants. Temperament and accuracy are the 2 key things that the players who will make up the spine of this team will have in abundance. I can see over time that even the Captain himself will be less of a presence in the side unless he learns from Capello. Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Facebook | Pick Report 12 Sep 2008 18:15 | Pick 0 1 stealthbanana Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Reuse this content,View all comments > Twitter theKnowledge Fabio Capello watches England beat Croatia next to assistant Franco Baldini. Photograph: Phil Cole/Getty Images Facebook Reply Report Share Share on Twitter Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp 12 Sep 2008 18:33 England did to Croatia what a lot of sides have done to them over the past few years – they held the ball and frustrated their opponents. I agree with all of the authors points about the weaknesses in the side. The good thing is that while the rest of the team can keep playing this way with good possession and good pass completion it will allow Capello to introduce new players into these areas of weakness without compromising the rest of his side’s effectiveness.He could swap Rooney with Gerrard, A Cole with Lescott, Barry with Hargreaves, Lampard with Carrick without changing the style of play which has to be a good thing.I still think as a whole the defence looks weak though and certain teams are going to exploit that when they play in the latter stages of tournaments but playing that way at least guarantees them a chance to get there at all. England will need to defend from the front as much as they can if they do not want to expose these defensive frailties. recommendations 12 Sep 2008 17:43 12 Sep 2008 14:53 Share on Facebook Facebook 0 1 Share Twitter Share Reply First published on Thu 11 Sep 2008 19.05 EDT Croatia Reply Share | Pick Share on Pinterest Facebook All Share on Twitter 12 Sep 2008 15:18 Share on Messenger View more comments PatrickTreacyCredit, in some part, must go to England for the Croats not playing well. Share Twitter Twitter Twitter Reason (optional) Share on Facebook Share via Email Mcarra for all his journalistic prowess still falls into the sensationalist trap. Why for instance should Gerrard NOT be considered for next game Kev? Likewise why should we COMPLETELY trust Capello after his instatement of Walcott?The article does hit two or three crucial points however, most notably Rooney’s insistence to track back whenever the ball is lost in the final third. However Im sure this can be resolved as the collective psychological is bolstered in due course and Wayne doesnt feel the need to shoulder all responsibility for the result; 3 assists and a fine goal will also ensure Capello sleeps like a baby for the coming weeks. (Not long ago Mcarra also called for Rooney to be dropped, how silly that now seems).Re a comment above – I feel England have their best defence in many a year, not least because of the fantastic p’ship between Rio and Terry. A better dynamic in CM could be a more valid request however, but again Fabio will have the resources to meddle. World Cup 2010last_img read more

Corporate FCPA Enforcement In 2014 Compared To Prior Years

first_img2011 15 2013 21 2011 7 2012 11 2011 In short, the number of core corporate FCPA enforcement actions in 2014 was tied for the second lowest in seven years.In closing, have it your way.However, the way I believe is the more accurate and reliable way to keep and analyze FCPA enforcement statistics is by focusing on unique instances of FCPA scrutiny (not settlement amounts) and tracking enforcement actions using the “core” approach. Core Actions None that significantly skewed the   statistics 2013 $149 million 20147 Settlement Amounts $6.23 billion 2010 16 8 9 $355 million Year The $579 million KBR / Halliburton   Bonny Island, Nigeria enforcement action comprised approximately 90% of the   $645 million amount. 13 2008 Settlement Amounts 9 2013 $420 million Corporate SEC FCPA Enforcement Action Settlement Amounts The $219 million JGC Corp. Bonny   Island, Nigeria enforcement action comprised approximately 44% of the $503   million amount 2011 $530 million $720 million Year 2010 $885 million $118 million 2014$327 million 2013 However, if one analyzes corporate FCPA enforcement statistics based on settlement amounts, corporate FCPA enforcement was up in 2014 compared to recent historical averages.Corporate DOJ FCPA Enforcement Action Settlement Amounts 2012 $300 million Year 20147 2012 I am no different from the other Foreign Corrupt Practices Act aficionados.I maintain and publish yearly FCPA statistics even though I fully acknowledge that year-to-year enforcement statistics, and the arbitrary cutoffs associated with such statistics, may be of marginal value given that many non-substantive factors can influence the timing of an actual FCPA enforcement action.For instance, if the Alcoa enforcement action happened 10 days earlier (instead of January 9, 2014) or if the Alstom enforcement action happened 10 days later (instead of December 22, 2014), 2014 FCPA enforcement settlement amounts would be materially different.Nevertheless and accepting year-to-year FCPA statistics for what they are, the issue remains:  how does one best analyze and interpret these statistics over time?Here is how I see it through reference to another example.  In year 1, a city issues 100 speeding tickets and collects $20,000 in fines associated with those tickets.  In year 2, a city issues 90 speeding tickets, but because certain drivers were going really fast, the city collects $25,000 in fines associated with those tickets.  Was there less enforcement in year 2 compared to year 1?  Depends on what you are measuring – the number of infractions or amount of fines.The some logic applies to year-to-year FCPA statistical data and I believe that the best way to track yearly enforcement is through the number of “core” enforcement actions.By this measure, although 2014 witnessed two very large settlement amounts, FCPA enforcement in 2014 was below historical averages.Previous posts (here and here) provided various facts and figures from 2014 DOJ FCPA enforcement and SEC FCPA enforcement.   Viewing FCPA enforcement statistics this way is useful and informative given that the DOJ and SEC are separate law enforcement agencies and different issues may arise in DOJ and SEC FCPA enforcement actions.As indicated by the below charts and by using the “core” approach to FCPA enforcement statistics (an approach the DOJ endorses), both DOJ and SEC corporate enforcement in 2014 was down from recent historical averagesCorporate DOJ FCPA Enforcement Actions Viewing FCPA enforcement in the aggregate (DOJ and SEC combined) is of course also useful and informative and in 2014 the DOJ and SEC combined collected approximately $1.6 billion in 10 corporate FCPA enforcement actions.  The below chart provides a summary of corporate FCPA enforcement data (DOJ and SEC combined) for the years 2007-2014, as well as notable circumstances that significantly skewed enforcement data statistics for a particular year (an occurrence that happens in most years including 2014).Corporate FCPA Enforcement Actions (2007-2014) Of Note Core Actions 10 19 2007 Year The $398 million Total enforcement   action comprised approximately 55% of the $720 million amount 2010 2012 Settlement Amounts $503 million 2011 17 2014$1.25 billion 2010 $645 million Six enforcement actions involved Iraq   Oil for Food conduct and these enforcement actions comprised 40% of all   enforcement actions and approximately 50% of the $149 million amount. $142 million 201410 $1.6 billionTwo enforcement actions (Alstom – $772 million and Alcoa – $384 million) comprised approximately 72% of the $1.6 billion amount. $870 million   TOTALS104 2012 Core Actions 2013 Six enforcement actions, all resolved   on the same day, centered on various oil and gas companies use Panalpina in   Nigeria. Panalpina also resolved an enforcement action on the same day.Two   enforcement actions (Technip and Eni / Snamprogetti) involved Bonny Island   conduct. In other words, there were 14 unique corporate enforcement actions   in 2010. Of further note, the two Bonny Island enforcement actions,   Technip($338 million) and Eni/Snamprogetti ($365 million) comprised   approximately 50% of the $1.4 billion amount. $148 million $260 million 2009 2010 Corporate SEC FCPA Enforcement Actions The $800 million Siemens enforcement   action comprised approximately 90% of the $885 million amount. 8 $1.4 billion 12 Year 11last_img read more

Study finds impact of negative positive social media experiences on depressive symptoms

first_img Source:http://www.upmc.com/media/NewsReleases/2018/Pages/primack-smposneg.aspx Jun 7 2018Negative experiences on social media carry more weight than positive interactions when it comes to the likelihood of young adults reporting depressive symptoms, according to a new University of Pittsburgh analysis.The finding, reported today in the journal Depression and Anxiety, may be useful for designing interventions and clinical recommendations to reduce the risk of depression.”We found that positive experiences on social media were not related or only very slightly linked to lower depressive symptoms. However, negative experiences were strongly and consistently associated with higher depressive symptoms,” said lead author Brian Primack, M.D., Ph.D., dean of the Honors College and director of the Center for Research on Media, Technology and Health at Pitt. “Our findings may encourage people to pay closer attention to their online exchanges. Moving forward, these results could assist scientists in developing ways to intervene and counter the negative effects while strengthening the positive ones.”In August 2016, Primack and his team surveyed 1,179 full-time students ages 18 to 30 at the University of West Virginia about their social media use and experiences. The participants also completed a questionnaire to assess their depressive symptoms.Each 10 percent increase in positive experiences on social media was associated with a 4 percent decrease in odds of depressive symptoms, but those results were not statistically significant, meaning that the finding could be due to random chance. However, each 10 percent increase in negative experiences was associated with a 20 percent increase in the odds of depressive symptoms, a statistically significant finding.”It is valuable to know that positive and negative experiences are very differently related to depression,” said Primack. “But we don’t know from our study whether the negative social media interactions actually caused the depressive symptoms or whether depressed individuals are more likely to seek out negative online interactions. As with many things in social science, the answer is probably some combination of the two, but more research will be needed to disentangle cause and effect.”Related StoriesSocial media use and television viewing linked to rise in adolescent depressive symptomsTeens who can describe negative emotions are better protected against depressionNew structured approach to managing patients with depression in primary careOther characteristics also were linked to the participants having depressive symptoms. For example, compared with men, women had 50 percent higher odds of having depressive symptoms. Identifying as non-white and having only completed “some college,” rather than completing a degree, also were associated with higher odds of depressive symptoms. All of these characteristics have previously been shown to increase a person’s likelihood of depression.While the findings still need to be replicated, Primack said public health practitioners could start using them to educate the public of the risks of negative social media interactions. He also points out that cyberbullying occurs not only among adolescents, but also among adults. Universities, workplaces and community spaces could use the findings to increase awareness around positive and negative social media experiences.Primack noted that health care professionals working with depressed patients could suggest strategies to improve the quality of online experiences, such as restricting time spent on social media to reduce the number of negative interactions and “unfriending” people or groups that tend to enable negative experiences.Although the finding was not statistically significant, Primack said that increasing the opportunities for positive experiences on social media is still likely to be worthwhile.”In other studies, engaging in certain forms of social media use has been shown to enhance communication and social connection,” he said. “Certainly, there are many situations in which connecting with others in this way might actually lower depressive symptoms. That just wasn’t the primary finding in this particular study.”last_img read more

Nose swab detects fatal brain disease

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The early signs of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)—a rare, incurable brain disorder caused by infectious, misshapen proteins called prions—are difficult to interpret. At first, people may simply feel depressed and can undergo personality changes or bouts of psychosis. By the time memory failure, blindness, and coma set in, typically within a year of infection, death is usually imminent. Now, researchers report that a simple nasal swab may help physicians detect the disease far more accurately and earlier than current methods.Finding simple, noninvasive diagnostic tests is “one of the holy grails” for CJD and other prion diseases, says biochemist Byron Caughey of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, who helped lead the new work. Although there’s no cure for CJD, early diagnosis is important because it can help rule out other, treatable disorders, and it allows medical personnel to take precautions that prevent the disease from spreading to others through exposure to brain tissue or spinal fluid, he says. A type of the disease called variant CJD in humans results from eating meat infected with mad cow disease.Researchers made a major stride toward better diagnostic methods in 2010, when Caughey and other researchers first described a new technique called the RT-QuIC test. The test requires removing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients by means of a spinal tap, putting samples into a bath of normally shaped prion proteins, and agitating the solution to encourage any abnormal prion “seeds” in the tissue to latch onto the regular proteins. If even trace amounts of pathogenic protein are present, they rapidly use the normal proteins to create millions of insoluble, fibrous amyloid strands. Researchers believe that these amyloid aggregates, also seen in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, ultimately cause CJD by interfering with or killing off neurons en masse. After death, the brains of people affected by CJD are so badly damaged that they often resemble Swiss cheese or sponges. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The RT-QuIC test, now being used in diagnostic centers around the world, works well but still misses about 10% to 20% of cases, Caughey says. It also requires an invasive, potentially painful spinal tap. In the new study, the researchers ran a fiber optic scope straight up patients’ noses to the very top of the nasal cavity where olfactory neurons are located. In theory, these neurons should contain much higher levels of abnormal prion protein tangles than does CSF because they are directly connected to the brain, Caughey notes. Then, the scientists rolled a small brush along the roof of the nasal vault and analyzed the samples of discharge or tissue they collected with the RT-QuIC assay.As predicted, the concentration of abnormal prions detected in the nasal samples was several orders of magnitude higher than those found in CSF, the group reports online today in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). Compared with the CSF-based method, which correctly identified only about 77% of positive cases in this study, the swab test caught 97% of 30 CJD-positive patients, missing just one. In addition, the nasal brushings produced no false negative results in 45 disease-free controls, Caughey says.“Much higher numbers of patients and controls need to be tested to work out the actual diagnostic sensitivity” of the test, but it appears to be a promising way of detecting CJD without performing an invasive procedure, Caughey says. One of his colleagues underwent the nasal brush test, he says, and although it was not exactly a pleasant experience, “there’s not much pain involved, apparently.”“This is a big advance,” says Pierluigi Gambetti, a neuropathologist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. In principle, the nasal brush test should make it possible to diagnose the disorder much earlier than the CSF–based technique because abnormal prions build up in olfactory neurons more quickly than they migrate out of the brain into spinal fluid, he says.Gambetti, who was not involved in the new study, is co-author on a second NEJM paper appearing online today that shows that an assay similar to the CSF–based RT-QuIC test can pick up very small amounts of abnormal prion protein in the urine of people who have contracted a rare variant of CJD that is transmitted by consuming contaminated meat. A handful of such cases have recently been diagnosed in the United States, he notes, and the urine test could be another quick, affordable way to screen for the disease.Although these new diagnostic methods may help prevent CJD from spreading, they can do little for patients themselves, Caughey says. “Hopefully someday we’ll have a therapy” so that clinicians can intervene before too much damage is done.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

Archaeologists uncover a Neolithic massacre in early Europe

first_imgA mass grave in Germany underscores what some archaeologists have long suspected: The first farmers were far from peaceful tillers of the soil. In a newly discovered form of Neolithic violence, attackers 7000 years ago systematically broke the shinbones of their 26 victims, many of them children, before dumping their bodies in a pit.The first farmers, who spread west from Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) to arrive in central Europe 7500 years ago, lived more settled lives than the nomadic fishing and foraging peoples they displaced. They built houses, cultivated plants, and decorated pottery. But researchers have long debated whether these Neolithic farming communities also engaged in warfare and other types of systemized violence. In the 1980s, the discovery of two Neolithic mass graves in Germany and Austria led many archaeologists to discount peaceful accounts of these early European farmers. The graves contained more than 100 bodies that bore the marks of a violent attack. Other researchers, however, continued to hold that violence among Neolithic people was rare, and they dismissed these massacre sites as peculiarities. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The new mass grave, described today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, will be difficult for the pacifiers of prehistory to ignore. “It is a very nice, very carefully executed study,” says bioarchaeologist Linda Fibiger from the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom.University of Mainz in Germany bioarchaeologist Christian Meyer and his colleagues learned of the burial site in 2006 when a construction company at Schöneck-Kilianstädten, near Frankfurt, reported that it had hit human remains. The bones were lifted in small blocks of soil, wrapped in newspaper, and delivered to Meyer. Although much of the bone was badly disintegrated, the team quickly realized it was dealing with comingled human remains that had been cast into a ditch and covered up. “There was no thought for burying family members together … no grave goods or arrangement of the bodies,” standard burial rites for Neolithic people, Meyer says.Cleaning and sorting the bones revealed the incomplete skeletons of 13 adults, one teenager, and 12 children—10 of them under 6 years old, and the youngest only 6 months old. The skeletons were dated to between 7200 and 6800 years ago, about as old as those found at the two other mass graves.The skulls showed signs of lethal blows, and more than 50% of the shin bones recovered from the grave were broken. “The fractures we found here were clearly fresh,” Meyer says. He and his team suspect that these people were either tortured or mutilated shortly after death.Lawrence Keeley, an archaeologist from the University of Illinois, Chicago, is not convinced it was torture: “Torture focuses on the parts of the body with the most nerve cells—feet, [genitals], hands, and head.” He suspects instead that the assailants smashed the shins of the villagers after they’d killed them to disable their ghosts, preventing them from pursuing their killers.Aside from the trauma to the lower leg bones, the newest site closely resembles the two known mass graves from this period. In all three cases, whole villages—which usually numbered only 30 to 40 people—were apparently wiped out. Most of the inhabitants were killed, except young women, who were probably kidnapped. “Once may be an accident, twice may be coincidence but thrice is a pattern,” Keeley says. He adds that these newest findings are “another nail in the coffin” of those who have claimed that war was rare among Neolithic farming communities.Meyer suspects the perpetrators of this violence were members of a neighboring village or villages. The newest grave site sits close to a border between two Neolithic groups known to have maintained distinct trading networks, making them possible enemies. With one group scrubbed from the landscape, their precious cultivable lands would have been up for grabs.Fibiger suggests that studying these past massacres and their aftermath could yield insight into the impact of modern-day violence, like that of the Srebrenica genocide during the Bosnian War. Trade networks and alliances might reflect the legacy of ancient massacres for generations to come, she says. “There were probably survivors of these events, or people who knew these [slaughtered] people.”last_img read more

Shifting water weight can trigger small earthquakes in California

first_img Shifting water weight can trigger small earthquakes in California Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A pattern emerged: of increased quakes in tandem with shifts in water-related stress, suggesting that the seasonal flexing of Earth’s crust, under the loading and unloading of water weight collected in snow packs, lakes, and reservoirs, can trigger certain kinds of earthquakes, the researchers report today in Science. For some faults, that happens more frequently in late summer, when water levels are lowest and Earth has rebounded from a previously heavy precipitation load. For other types of faults, the rise in small temblors came in spring, when Earth is in the middle of rebounding—as snow melts and runs downstream, Johnson says. For the various types of faults, the difference between the peak quake months and the slowest months is small, varying by roughly 10%.The findings help show that the duration of the force changes at the surface matter as much as their magnitude, Johnson says. California tidal fluctuations—another potential mover of Earth—bear down on the coast with a force comparable to the seasonal water weight. But those show little effect on quakes in the state. That appears to be because tides change on a 12-hour cycle, rather than a 12-month one, Johnson says.That offers insights into the way that earthquakes, big and small, are born, says Jean-Philippe Avouac, an earthquake scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. “It tells us that the nucleation process is long enough that there is no response to Earth tides. But it is short enough that it can respond to the annual fluctuation of stress,” Avouac says.Although the findings are intriguing, there’s a risk of overstating the links between water weight and quakes, says John Vidale, a geophysicist at the University of Washington in Seattle who has studied tides and quakes. The findings shed light on how relatively small stresses can influence quakes. But, he says, that won’t necessarily translate into the elusive quest to predict earthquakes. “It’s not like we’re going to suddenly be predicting big earthquakes weeks ahead of time because of this.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Water shapes California powerfully, deluging the state with El Niño–generated rainfalls and drying it out with punishing droughts. Now, a new study suggests that water may play yet another role: triggering earthquakes.Scientists for decades have tried to understand how different natural forces, pressing on Earth’s surface, might help explain changes in earthquake rates, with mixed results. The pulsing of the tides has been one long-standing suspect, but their effect is weak or nonexistent. In the Himalayas, rains from the annual monsoon season have also been found to affect quake frequency. And in California, criss-crossed with faults and at the center of grinding tectonic plates, quake activity seems to increase regularly in the autumn along part of the San Andreas fault—during the driest time of year.To find out whether precipitation was playing a role, geophysicist Christopher Johnson, a recent Ph.D. graduate from the University of California, Berkeley, set out with colleagues to gather data from a network of 661 GPS sensors scattered around the state. The units are sensitive enough to detect when the ground rises or sinks by a few millimeters because of water weight, groundwater pumping, and tides, among other things. The scientists then teased out how much of those fluctuations came from water being added to or subtracted from Earth’s surface, and calculated how that affected forces deep underground where earthquakes begin, or nucleate. Those force changes were matched with a catalog of nearly 3700 California quakes between 2006 and 2014.center_img REUTERS/Robert Galbraith By Warren CornwallJun. 15, 2017 , 2:45 PM Shifting water weight from California’s rainy seasons has been linked to the frequency of small earthquakes. Emaillast_img read more

American cockroaches thrive in cities thanks to their incredibly long genomes

first_imgRedmond Durrell/Alamy Stock Photo American cockroaches thrive in cities, thanks to their incredibly long genomes The researchers also found that cockroaches have genes that allow them to regrow broken limbs—the same genes present in other insects, including the fruit fly. The team proposes that future research will better clarify the evolutionary relationship between cockroaches and termites, and may provide helpful information for controlling both pests. Few insects have a reputation for grossing people out as thoroughly as the American cockroach. The so-called water bugs, which thrive indoors on fermenting and rotting foods, are rich sources of disease-causing bacteria. Now, researchers have sequenced their genome for the first time—and have uncovered some of the secrets to their uncanny ability to survive in our urban jungles.Compared with other insects, the genome of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is the second largest sequenced to date after the locust. Like the locust, much of the cockroach genome, some 60%, is made of repetitive elements—sequences of DNA that occur over and over. And compared with three other species in its family—the German cockroach and two termite species—it is actually more closely related to the termites.But the secret to its urban success may lie in another part of the genome. The American cockroach has genes that code for more than 150 scent receptors and 500 taste receptors, the most found in any insect so far. These, coupled with hundreds of other chemical receptors, are likely the reason cockroaches are such effective scavengers, the researchers report today in Nature Communications. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Kimberly HickokMar. 20, 2018 , 12:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

22 Times Racists Got Dealt With On Video

first_imgThese are amazingly trying times we’re all living in now, and depending on someone’s nationality or ethnic background, or both, everybody needs to stay on their toes while navigating the world. But things have gotten especially bad in the United States, where overt acts of racism seem to be at a fever pitch since the election of Donald Trump.That fact has been bolstered and then some by research, studies, poll and other data showing the proliferation of white nationalism and hate crimes based on race in particular. Black Americans were the Number 1 target of hate crimes in the country, a statistic that has been steadily rising in recent years.But there’s only so much racist abuse people can take before they start fighting back. That was proven by a thread of video footage recently posted to Twitter that shows “racists getting what they deserve.” 4. 8. 12. 6. 9. 5. 13. 19. 18. pic.twitter.com/N9o3YW1Two— Timsomor (#ADOS #FBA Baltimore) (@Timsomor) April 24, 2019 17. “Move Mojito” who remember this one! pic.twitter.com/ytdskhwVZH— Timsomor (#ADOS #FBA Baltimore) (@Timsomor) April 24, 2019 10. 11. 2. 21. Racist in #Chicago drops the n-bomb on brotha minding his business and catches the Blue Line to FadeTown. #TrumpsAmerica #Resist #3rdRailFade #Nah #PunchANazi2018 pic.twitter.com/vFuc9n3a42— Keanu Seethes (@theori) July 13, 2018 14. 3. 1. 7. 16. pic.twitter.com/XBUxmbUbs4— Timsomor (#ADOS #FBA Baltimore) (@Timsomor) April 24, 2019 20. You want it to be one way… but it’s the other way pic.twitter.com/Oa3XF5Wclc— ManSitChoAzzDown (@AngryManTV) March 18, 2018 15. pic.twitter.com/aIw42crOZw— Timsomor (#ADOS #FBA Baltimore) (@Timsomor) April 24, 2019 racists getting what they deserve: a mega thread pic.twitter.com/hdfmPUgPtx— JOAN OF ART 2 (@imcornell) April 22, 2019To be clear, NewsOne does not condone violence in the least, no matter the circumstances. But we are also realistic and aware that we live in a country that was founded on the bloodiest of violence waged by white colonizers against the brown natives.The concept of compiling instances where the oppressed fights back against the oppressor is not new. In fact, NewsOne previously published our own running list of so-called BBQ Beckys — white vigilantes who felt it was their duty to use 911 as a weapon to police Black and brown people in America simply living their lives legally and peacefully.But this brilliant list posted by Twitter user @imcornell goes well beyond that idea and includes video showing white people being blatantly racist while recklessly throwing around the N-word as if there were no consequences for such language.These video clips prove that there is indeed a price to pay (physically, at least) for wielding racist and ethnic slurs at the wrong people. And those who come collecting aren’t always Black or brown.Scroll down to see 14 amazing instances of racist hatred backfiring to violent proportions. Hopefully, these videos can serve as messages of precaution to anybody who thinks calling people racist slurs to their faces (or even behind their backs) will result in anything other than a swift beat down.last_img read more