Pilots shut off wrong engine after bird hit: DGCA report

first_imgThe final investigation report of the Directorate General of Civil Aviation on a bird hit suffered by a Delhi-Mumbai GoAir flight on June 21, 2017, has revealed that the pilots turned off the wrong engine and flew the plane on the engine that had ingested the bird. The report, made public on Tuesday, stated that after about three minutes the crew realised the mistake and tried to restart the other engine mid-air. They then declared an emergency and returned to Delhi, managing to land on a single engine on the second attempt. There were 156 passengers on board at the time of the incident. “The incident was caused by incorrect identification of engine affected with high vibration followed by non-adherence to recommended procedures, lack of situational awareness, poor Cockpit Resource Management and poor handling of aircraft during emergency subsequent to bird strike,” the report prepared by the office of Director of Air Safety (Western Region) said. Mid-air scareAccording to the findings, during take-off roll at around 115 knots, the aircraft — an A320 — encountered a bird strike on engine number 2. “Both crew noticed abnormal sound and vibrations but the pilot in command decided to continue the take-off probably wanting to investigate the problem after getting airborne. After the take-off, the situation was incorrectly assessed and engine number 1 (unaffected engine) was shut down. The aircraft was climbing with the single engine — engine 2 (affected engine), for over three minutes,” the report said. It pinned the blame of the “incorrect assessment” on the First Officer. As the aircraft stopped climbing at around 3,330 feet altitude, the crew realised their mistake and attempted to start engine number 1 but encountered start valve fault. The investigation also revealed that another pilot flying as Staff On Duty entered the cockpit after pressing the cockpit buzzer several times. The pilot in command submitted that he allowed the SOD inside the cockpit because the buzzer was distracting. “The SOD was heard asking information on the problem to cockpit crew while they were performing their duties in-flight and after landing as well,” the report said. As per the pilot in command, there was no information by Air Traffic Control about bird activity but the Air Traffic Information Services reported bird activity in its broadcast. The report also mentioned that after the incident, while taxiing to the allocated stand for parking, the crew took a wrong turn and parked the aircraft in an incorrect orientation.last_img

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