New dean for HGSE

first_imgJames E. Ryan, one of the nation’s leading scholars of education law and policy, will become the next dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), President Drew Faust announced today.Ryan, an award-winning teacher who has served on the University of Virginia faculty since 1998, succeeds Kathleen McCartney, who will leave Harvard to become president of Smith College on July 1.Ryan will officially assume his new role on Sept. 1, near the start of the 2013-14 academic year. Richard J. Murnane, the Juliana W. and William Foss Thompson Professor of Education and Society at the HGSE, will serve as acting dean from July 1 until Ryan begins his tenure.[Read a question-and-answer session with the new dean here.]“Jim Ryan is an outstanding scholar, teacher, and academic leader with a deep passion for improving education and for enhancing the interplay of scholarship, practice, and policy,” Faust said. “Throughout the search, I have been impressed by his seamless integration of the intellectual and the practical, his warm and open personal style, and his evident talent for drawing together people from different backgrounds, disciplines, and points of view.“He has a keen interest in how diverse modes of academic research can benefit education practice and policy,” Faust added, “and how the concrete challenges facing educational leaders and policymakers, as well as teachers and students, can helpfully inform the scholarship and teaching we do here. He is also an astute and empathetic listener, and I know he looks forward to connecting with people across the HGSE in the coming weeks and months as he prepares to take up his new role.”“I am honored and excited by this opportunity, and grateful to Drew Faust for inviting me to take on this role at such a critical time in education and in the life of the School,” said Ryan. “Kathy McCartney’s extraordinary leadership has generated great momentum, and I’m eager to build on that progress in close collaboration with remarkably talented faculty, staff, and students within the Ed School and across the University. Understanding how students learn, enhancing educational achievement, and expanding educational opportunity are among the defining challenges of our time, and the HGSE has an essential leadership role to play in meeting them. I look forward to serving a school with the intellectual vitality and commitment not simply to contribute to the field but to continue transforming it.”“I am honored and excited by this opportunity, and grateful to Drew Faust for inviting me to take on this role at such a critical time in education and in the life of the School,” said James Ryan, seen here during a welcoming reception inside Gutman Library. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerA highly influential scholar at the crossroads of education, law, and policy, Ryan is currently the William L. Matheson and Robert M. Morgenthau Distinguished Professor of Law and the F. Palmer Weber Research Professor of Civil Liberties and Human Rights at the University of Virginia. He is also co-founder and director of the Program in Law and Public Service at the University of Virginia School of Law, where he served for five years as the academic associate dean. He was a member of the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission, which was charged with examining disparities in meaningful educational opportunities that give rise to the achievement gap, and with recommending ways that federal policies could address such disparities.Educational opportunity has been the predominant focus of Ryan’s most recent scholarship and teaching. His book “Five Miles Away, A World Apart: One City, Two Schools, and the Story of Educational Opportunity in Modern America” (Oxford University Press, 2010) explores questions of school segregation and inequality in the context of an urban school in Richmond, Va., and a nearby suburban school. He has written numerous articles for academic journals and other publications on such topics as school finance, school desegregation, school choice, school governance, a right to pre-school, teacher compensation reform, and the federal No Child Left Behind Act. He is also co-author of the casebook “Educational Policy and the Law” (2011).Ryan has been honored with both the University of Virginia’s All-University Teaching Award (2010) and with the Outstanding Faculty Award presented by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (2011). His courses have included offerings on law and education, comparative education law and policy, and schools, race, and law. He has lectured widely on a range of education policy matters.Ryan served on the board of the Maya Angelou Public Charter School in Washington, D.C. Previously, he served on the Century Foundation’s Task Force on the Common School and as vice chair of the American Bar Association’s Committee on Public Schools. He has also served as a pro bono consultant on numerous education-related legal and policy issues.He has received the U.Va. Law School’s McFarland Prize for Outstanding Scholarship, the Education Law Association’s Award for Distinguished Scholarship, and the U.Va. Black Law Students Association’s Outstanding Service Award.In addition to his scholarship and teaching on education law and policy, Ryan has taught and written about constitutional law, local government law, and Supreme Court litigation. He graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. from Yale in 1988, graduated first in his class from U.Va. Law School in 1992, and clerked for the late Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist of the U.S. Supreme Court. A former visiting professor of law at both Harvard and Yale, he was the inaugural Cameron Fellow at the University of Auckland in New Zealand.Ryan is married to Karoline (Katie) Homer Ryan, a clinical instructor at U.Va. who specializes in child advocacy and special education law. The couple has four children.In announcing the appointment, Faust expressed appreciation to “the many members of the HGSE community who have been so generous and thoughtful with advice on the dean search at a pivotal moment for the School. I especially thank the members of the faculty advisory committee for the search, whose lively discussions and candid counsel have done so much to shed light on the HGSE’s recent trajectory and future opportunities and to bring the search to an excellent conclusion.”last_img read more

Fans travel for international season opener

first_imgDUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said gameday in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame gameday until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”,DUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said game day in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame game day until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”last_img read more

University names valedictorian, salutatorian for 2019 commencement ceremonies

first_imgSeniors Sofia Carozza and Annelise Gill-Wiehl will be valedictorian and salutatorian of the 2019 Notre Dame graduating class, respectively, the University announced in a press release Wednesday.The two were chosen following an application process that invites the top three students of each school in the University with the highest grade point average to submit faculty recommendations and a draft of their commencement speech. The press release said a selection committee chose the finalists who were then approved by University President Fr. John Jenkins.A native of South Bend and a graduate of Saint Joseph High School, Carozza is a neuroscience and behavior major with a supplemental major in theology as well as a minor in philosophy, politics and economics. Carrying a 4.0 grade point average, Carozza is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar and a de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture Sorin Fellow, the press release said.Over the course of her time at Notre Dame, Carozza has been involved with the Institute for Advanced Study, ND Students for Worker Justice, Show Some Skin and Baraka Bouts, the press release said. The statement said Carozza is fluent in Italian, conversational in Spanish and is a classically trained harpist. She was named a recipient of the Marshall Scholarship in December, which will allow her pursue a master of philosophy in basic and translational neuroscience and eventually a doctorate at the University of Cambridge in England.In the community, Carozza is also a mental health coach for at-risk youth and is involved with heading an exercise program at the St. Joseph County Juvenile Justice Center. During her summers, she has tutored disabled children in Paraguay at the National Institute for International Studies at Notre Dame, conducted neuroscience research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and studied toxic stress at the ChildWise Institute in Montana.Hailing from St. Louis, Gill-Wiehl is an environmental engineering major with a minor in international development studies. A member of the Chi Epsilon civil engineering honor society and Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society, Gill-Wiehl has performed research at the University through the Kellogg Institute and the Atmospheric Chemistry and Aerosol Modeling Group on topics such as environmental sustainability and infrastructure, the release said.On campus, Gill-Wiehl is involved with Kellogg Institute International Scholars, NDSEED and student government, in addition to serving as co-president of GlobeMed. She is also a member of both the Chi Epsilon civil engineering honor society and the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. She is also conversational in Swahili.Gill-Wiehl has been recognized for work at Notre Dame in the past with the Rev. Thomas A. Steiner Award in the College of Engineering for excellence and commitment to engineering and to the common good as well as the John W. Gardner Student Leadership Award for exemplifying the ideals of the University through outstanding volunteer service beyond campus, the release said. Gill-Wiehl plans to attend the University of California, Berkeley to pursue a doctorate in energy resources.Tags: 2019 Commencement, 2019 salutatorian, 2019 valedictorian, salutatorian, valedictorianlast_img read more

University to ease restrictions on gatherings, heat outdoor spaces, provide indoor dining

first_imgThe University will begin to loosen restrictions as a result of a decrease in the number of positive COVID-19 cases in the community, vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding said in an email Thursday.Students may begin to gather outdoors in groups of 20 or fewer, and indoor gatherings will depend on the distanced capacity of the space to allow for proper physical distancing.As a result of a decrease in case counts in residence halls, up to two additional residents of the same residence hall may gather in another student’s room. All will be required to wear masks, physically distance and leave the doors open.“If this extension is successful and case counts stay low, we anticipate modifying the guest policy again by opening up 24-hour space in a few weeks,” Hoffmann Harding said. “Please help us achieve this goal by continuing to follow all requested health and safety protocols.”The University has extended hours in a number of spaces across campus, and the eighth floor of Duncan Student Center will now be open for study use between 8 p.m. and midnight daily.A number of outdoor locations will begin to be heated, including Library Lawn, South Lawn, North Quad, South Quad, East Quad and West Quad.North and South Dining Halls will offer indoor dining with physically distanced seats and plexiglass shields.“These steps will increase seating capacity while reducing potential virus transmission,” Hoffmann Harding said. “All meals will continue to be served in takeout containers with additional seating available in the adjacent heated tents and other locations around campus.”More details regarding the Winter Session will be relayed in the next few weeks. Notre Dame will offer a limited number of housing options during the session, but separate charges and contracts will apply.Hoffmann Harding closed the email by reminding students to continue to follow the health and safety protocols.“Thank you for all you are doing to keep us healthy by following the University’s health and safety protocols,” Hoffmann Harding said. “I am proud of our community and grateful to be on campus together.”Tags: COVID-19, duncan student center, Erin Hoffmann Hardinglast_img read more