Notable Vertebrate Fossils

first_imgVertebrate fossils are only a tiny fraction of the record, but they are usually the most interesting to us.Underwater Fossil Graveyard Reveals Toll of Human-Caused Extinction (Live Science): “If humans had never set foot in the Bahamas, the islands today might be teeming with Cuban crocodiles, Albury’s tortoises and rock iguanas,” this article says. Remains of these creatures have been found in a flooded sinkhole, providing evidence they survived the ice age. They should have been there except for the arrival of humans later, the article argues.  PhysOrg‘s coverage suggests this is still a theory being tested.Meet Jane, the Most Complete Adolescent T. Rex Ever Found (Live Science): The authors of a study of “Jane” the teen-age T. rex have called into question the status of Nanotyrannus. Some are now arguing that Nanotyrannus is just a juvenile T. rex. Old dino digger Robert Bakker is not backing down on his claim it’s a separate species; he discovered it and named it, after all. Meanwhile, PhysOrg offers a new theory that dinosaur nasal passages kept the animals cool, and a Live Science video shares the exciting suggestion that the tail of Apatosaurus, cracking like the whip of Indiana Jones, may have broken the speed of sound.Treasure trove of late Triassic fossils discovered in Utah (PhysOrg): This “fantastic site” has creatures like pterosaurs, crocodile-like reptiles and dinosaurs. Brigham Young University is excavating the site, dubbed “Saints and Sinners” because one is a Mormon and two others are not.  Some 11,500 bones have been found so far, some of them remarkably well preserved:“It is absurdly rare to find delicate, small skeletons from anywhere in time, anywhere in the world,” said Adam Pritchard, a Yale paleontologist not part of the discovery team. “To have them from the Triassic period, which is the very beginning of the age of reptiles, is really unprecedented, especially in western north America.”76-million-year-old extinct species of pig-snouted turtle unearthed in Utah (Science Daily): The Miss Piggy of fossil turtles turned up in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. Two feet long from head to tail, this “weird turtle” that walked with dinosaurs. “The new specimen includes not only the skull and the shell, but also a nearly complete forelimb, partial hindlimbs, and vertebrae from the neck and tail,” the article says. While this turtle is unlike any other ever found, “those fossil beds also hold the remains of many crocodilians, turtles, lizards and amphibians that don’t look much different from their modern relatives” in spite of being over 75 million Darwin years old.Dilophosaurus – less of a frilly, venom-spitting lizard than we thought (PhysOrg): Time to revise Jurassic Park I. The scary, frilly poison-spitter Dilophosaurus wasn’t what the filmmakers portrayed, paleontologist Robert Gay explains in a lengthy article from a PLoS blog. Three individuals are known from the Kayenta formation in Utah. Conclusions drawn from earlier studies are now in doubt. “So where does this leave the state of early theropod evolution? Pretty unsettled.”Everything’s Bigger in Texas: Ancient Supersize Shark Fossils Unearthed (Live Science): An enormous “supershark” has been found in Texas, some 25% longer than a great white. “Supershark lived before the age of the dinosaurs, which emerged about 230 million years ago. Until now, the oldest giant shark was found in rocks dating to 130 million years ago,” meaning that evolutionists have to dial back the origin of giant sharks to “much further in the fossil record than previously thought,” the article admits.Evolution: An avian explosion (Nature): This is another paper claiming that the fossil record of bird evolution can be reconciled with molecular evidence. The solution, however, requires near stasis for millions of years till after the extinction of the dinosaurs, then an explosion of diversification afterward. “Indeed, the early diversification of birds may have been so rapid that it resembles a network, or bush, rather than a beautifully bifurcating tree of life.” The latest solution requires “hopeful caution” while calling for more fossils. “In the absence of a perfect fossil record, the best we can do is experiment with different calibration dates and levels of uncertainty around those dates.” See also Current Biology‘s lengthy entry, “The Origin and Diversification of Birds,” which puts a more confident macroevolutionary face on the confusing picture. Confident, that is, if one is willing to accept bursts of evolution at arbitrary junctures, and poof-spoof excursions like, “although early birds and even some non-bird dinosaurs had volant capabilities, powered flight as we know it in modern birds most certainly developed after the origin of birds themselves.” (See Flight: The Genius of Birds for challenges to the origin of powered flight by Darwinian processes.)The horse series 3.0 (Current Biology): This primer by Ludovic Orlando describes Equids, both fossil and living horses, donkeys, and zebras. He takes the old museum line that “The evolutionary transition from multiple-toed to one-toed animals can be followed in great detail in the fossil record and represents one of the most popular textbook examples of macroevolution.” He shows the old four-toed to one-toed illustration. His tale, though, requires multiple migrations:The Old World was colonized several times by distinct equid groups, including Hipparions 12 million years ago, which, except for their three toes (Figure 2), resembled modern horses. It was not until two million years ago that the most recent common ancestor of present-day asses and zebras crossed Beringia. Within the following 500,000 years, their ancestors rapidly expanded across Eurasia and entered Africa at least twice independently. The descendants of the first migration later radiated into a diversity of zebras while those of the second migration gave rise to modern donkeys and African wild asses (Equus africanus; Figure 1).Horses entered the Old World in a separate migration, probably no earlier than 700,000 years ago, and expanded into Eurasia throughout a territory already populated by ancestors of Asiatic Wild asses. Their demographic history was punctuated by major cycles of expansions and collapses, probably related to the major glacial and interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene. Reduction in grassland cover during the Last Glacial Maximum led to a massive horse population crash in Eurasia, and to a total extinction in the Americas about 10,000 years ago. Therefore, all present-day American horses, including the free-roaming Mustangs, living symbols of the American West pioneering spirit, descend from European horses brought in after the Spanish conquest.Yet he talks very little about actual fossils. This scenario seems highly contrived to fit the dating scheme that evolutionists need to maintain against the fossil evidence. In addition to multiple migrations, the story requires seemingly reckless tales of interbreeding and hybridization. And surely there must be a lot more to macroevolution than losing toes or changing body size; what about all the organs and internal systems? Each one is clearly an Equid. Even young-Earth creationists accept that today’s horses look different from the original created kind.Sound familiar? Everything appears earlier than thought, exceptionally preserved, often just like modern representatives, buried instantly in flood conditions. Evolution is a highly-contrived “scenario” twisted and contorted to fit preconceived notions. See the process in “How not to work a puzzle” in the 5/01/2008 commentary.(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Former OFBF Executive Vice President Bill Swank dies at 88

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest C. William Swank, who served as Ohio Farm Bureau executive vice president from 1968-1996, died Sept. 21, 2019. Swank helped Ohio Farm Bureau grow into the advocacy organization it is today, all the while keeping the economic and social well being of farm families top of mind.Among the most important legislative accomplishments that occurred during his tenure were the establishment of Current Agriculture Use Value (CAUV) program, the phase out of the personal property tax for agricultural production and in 1992 leading a coalition of business and industry groups against Issue 5, the chemical labeling law ballot initiative.During his 40-year career, Swank received the Ohio State University Board of Trustees Distinguished Service Award, Ohio Farm Bureau’s Distinguished Service Award and is a member of the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame, to name just a few.A U.S. Air Force veteran, Swank earned his Bachelor of Science, master’s and doctorate from Ohio State University and was recognized by the university in many ways, including the establishment of an endowed chair in Rural\Urban Policy. An economist and participant in agricultural issues nationally and internationally, Swank regularly kept in touch with Farm Bureau staff and industry leaders on current issues.“Bill Swank was one of the true giants in Ohio agriculture,” said Adam Sharp, Ohio Farm Bureau executive vice president. “His visionary leadership built Farm Bureau into a powerful tool for farm families and helped guide the entire food and farm industry.  His passion for farmers was unmatched. He was smart, funny and kind. All of us in agriculture today are benefiting from his legacy.”He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Helen, and two daughters and their families, including nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his son, Michael.Remember that we are always looking at a parade of people. They’re moving through and past–it’s never done. You can know and teach that group that’s right in front of you, but pretty soon, they’re not here and it’s a new group. We’ve got the knowledge that there always is this parade of people, a parade of issues–it never stops and so our work is never done. ~ C. William Swank in his 1995 retirement address at the 77th Ohio Farm Bureau annual meeting.Service detailsFamily will receive friends from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019 at The Church of the Messiah, U.M., 51 N. State St., Westerville where services will follow at 11 a.m. Saturday.Photo caption: In 2017, former Executive Vice President Bill Swank (pictured with his wife, Helen, and OFBF Executive Vice President Adam Sharp) was honored at the Ohio Farm Bureau state office. The executive conference room, which holds not only meetings but plaques and awards from Swank’s time as executive vice president, was renamed the C. William Swank Executive Conference Room.last_img read more

Harver is on the Way to Reinvent High-Volume Hiring with $15M Series B Funding

first_imgBrad AndersonEditor In Chief at ReadWrite 4 Painless Ways to Pay off Small Business Loans… A leading pre-employment assessment platform Harver has raised $15M in Series B funding led by Insight Partners, bringing the company’s total funding to $35M. The company with offices in New York, Amsterdam, and London aims to digitally transform volume recruiting into an enjoyable process for recruiters, hiring managers and candidates alike. For more information on Harver, visit here.Through a combination of scientifically validated assessments and customized situational judgment tests, companies can make data-driven hiring decisions and mitigate against unconscious bias.Recruiters and hiring managers see how the candidates’ skills and characteristics match the role and the company, rather than having to make assumptions based on their background or previous experience. With Harver, organizations can focus on assessing characteristics that are truly predictive for success on the job.Harver is helping clients like KPMG, Zappo, and Booking, to manage large volumes of applicants and at the same time, provide an engaging candidate experience.Besides applying on mobile, Harver also allows candidates to self-schedule interviews and receive updates on their application process. As a result, recruiters and hiring managers save hours on pre-screening, leaving them with more time for other, arguably more important tasks.“In a reality where technology takes care of all the tedious work while removing biases, recruiters can do what they love to do: build a true connection between the applicants and the organization. Harver will provide this reality,” says Barend Raaff, CEO at Harver.By automating parts of their recruitment process, organizations can significantly decrease the time spent on filling their vacancies. One of the largest European supermarket chains, Albert Heijn, reduced their time to hire by 40 percent after implementing Harver.The company is planning to use the recent investment to further expand its product. The investment will help more companies digitally transform their recruitment process, empowering recruiters and hiring managers to make fast and data-driven hiring decisions.“We have been at the forefront of recruitment innovation since the inception of our company. This investment will enable us to take another leap forward in eliminating bias from the recruitment process and create a level playing field for all job seekers,” concludes Raaff. Related Posts Business Loan vs Equity Financing: How to Fund … Pyze Announces $4.6 Million Funding Round for A… Tags:#Harver#hiring#Hiring Process#Reinvent high-volume hiring Brad is the editor overseeing contributed content at ReadWrite.com. He previously worked as an editor at PayPal and Crunchbase. You can reach him at brad at readwrite.com. Venture Capital Is Just One Funding Option, Rem…last_img read more

Neuer: Germany do not need changes

first_imgGermany No Germany line-up changes needed despite Mexico defeat, says Neuer Josh Challies 20:01 6/19/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Neuer cropped Getty Images Germany World Cup Germany v Sweden Sweden The world champions were beaten by Mexico in their tournament opener, but the goalkeeper does not expect Joachim Low to ring the changes Manuel Neuer does not believe Germany need to change their starting line-up in response to their 1-0 defeat to Mexico on Sunday.Hirving Lozano’s first-half goal condemned Germany to their first opening defeat at a World Cup since 1982, raising the pressure on the defending champions ahead of clashes against Sweden and South Korea.The last two world champions, Italy and Spain, have both exited the World Cup at the group stages in the defence of their crowns and defeat for Joachim Low’s side against Sweden on Saturday could bring a premature end to their campaign in Russia. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Sorry, Cristiano! Pjanic is Juventus’ most important player right now Arsenal would be selling their soul with Mourinho move However, Neuer is confident the squad will respond positively to the defeat against Mexico and, despite Germany’s depth, feels that changes to the line-up are not necessary.”I don’t think we need to take out one or two of the players to bring in new ones,” the captain told reporters on Tuesday.”We’re not thinking about changes in the squad or in the team but the quality is there throughout. For some of the players it’s the first tournament but there are also very experienced players.Last time we lost our opening #WorldCup​ game in 1982, we reached the final Who’s to say we can’t do it again?! #DieMannschaft #ZSMMN pic.twitter.com/5GfLF3kTpg— Germany (@DFB_Team_EN) June 18, 2018″Everyone is raring to go again, in Monday on training it was clear the players were fired up. They were battling and of course battling for places, everybody wants to be involved in the games.”Everyone is desperate to play. We are not scared of giving our own opinion to each other within the squad as to who we think should play.”Germany, like the other nations at the World Cup, are also adjusting to the introduction of VAR and Neuer admits it has had an impact on the squad.”We have a new situation with VAR and those things need to be discussed too. You have to wait to see how the referee decides things and there will be a bit of a break after that,” the 77-cap goalkeeper added.”The decisions are difficult to make and you can’t protest. Only the referee can decide if there’s an offside or not, we have no say in it.”Germany fly to Sochi on Tuesday ahead of the clash against Sweden and Jonas Hector is available again after missing the Mexico defeat with the flu.last_img read more