College Football Playoff Update 7 Teams Competing For 4 Positions

The college football playoff picture would have become much blurrier had Auburn held on to defeat No. 1 Alabama on Saturday. Instead, the Crimson Tide prevailed 55-44. There were some losses to teams ranking behind Alabama — No. 4 Mississippi State, No. 8 UCLA and No. 9 Georgia were all beaten — but they tended to clarify how the teams will line up heading into conference championship weekend. Here’s how FiveThirtyEight’s college football forecast model expects the playoff committee’s rankings might look when they come out on Tuesday evening:The top four seem reasonably clear. Alabama, Oregon and Florida State are likely to remain No. 1 through No. 3 in that order. TCU, No. 5 entering the week, will probably be promoted to No. 4 after demolishing Texas 48-10.Ohio State, No. 6 last week, might give the committee more to think about. Buckeye quarterback J.T. Barrett was injured (and knocked out for the season) late in a win against Michigan. The committee has said it will consider “key injuries that … likely will affect [a team’s] postseason performance.” (The FiveThirtyEight model does not make any assumptions about injuries and so it might overrate Ohio State’s chances of making the playoff.)But the team ranking just behind Ohio State, Baylor, turned in one of the less impressive performances of the week, prevailing over Texas Tech by just 2 points, 48-46. Texas Tech, 4-8 on the season, could have tied the game and probably sent it into overtime with a successful two-point conversion.Michigan State and Arizona, No. 10 and No. 11 entering the weekend, are almost certain to move up in the rankings given the losses ahead of them. But only Arizona has realistic playoff hopes; the Wildcats will face Oregon for the Pac-12 championship after having beaten Arizona State. How far they move up on Tuesday should tell us something about how seriously the committee takes them.Here’s how the FiveThirtyEight model projects the committee’s final rankings on Dec. 7, which will determine the four teams that make the playoff:Even with just one one week to play, the scenarios are reasonably complex. So let’s briefly discuss the playoff from the perspective of the seven teams that are most likely to make it:Alabama (94 percent chance of making playoff). Are the Crimson Tide guaranteed to be in? Not quite. But in addition to catching a few breaks against Auburn, Alabama also benefitted from Missouri winning and advancing to face them in next week’s SEC Championship game. At least according to the computer rankings, Missouri is a weaker opponent than Georgia would have been. And Missouri (No. 17 heading into the weekend) is probably coming from too far behind to leap Alabama in committee standings even with a win in Atlanta. In fact, the model gives Alabama a 67 percent chance of making the playoff even with an SEC Championship loss.Oregon (82 percent chance). Oregon controls its destiny but has less ability to survive a loss in their championship game; the model gives them a 30 percent chance of making the playoff if they lose. That’s, in part, because Oregon’s opponent, Arizona, could plausibly enter the playoff if it wins the Pac-12 championship.TCU (80 percent chance). Although TCU will likely remain behind Florida State in Tuesday’s rankings, the model has them as a safer bet to make the playoff. That’s mainly because TCU’s upcoming matchup is easier. TCU will play a previously-scheduled game against a middling Iowa State team next week (the Big 12 does not host a championship game). Florida State will face a more difficult opponent, Georgia Tech, in the ACC Championship.TCU’s case may be more complicated than the model implies, however, because it lost earlier in the season to Big 12 rival Baylor. But last week’s performance may give the committee a good excuse to ignore the head-to-head result and instead look to factors like results against common opponents like Texas Tech. While Baylor only narrowly escaped Texas Tech, TCU had beaten them 82-27 on Oct. 25.Florida State (70 percent chance). The undefeated Seminoles helped their cause with a win against Florida. But they’re only 65 percent favorites to beat Georgia Tech in the ACC Championship. If the Seminoles lose, they’ll have only a 15 percent chance of making the playoff, according to the model.It didn’t help Florida State that the No. 5 through 7 teams (TCU, Ohio State and Baylor) all won last weekend. The committee isn’t especially fond of the Seminoles, and a loss in the ACC Championship could allow TCU, Ohio State or Baylor to leap frog them.Ohio State (39 percent chance). The model gives Ohio State a 66 percent chance of making the playoff should it beat Wisconsin in the Big Ten championship (and almost no shot if it loses that game). That doesn’t account for the injury to Barrett — although if backup Cardale Jones is good enough to beat the Badgers, that arguably ought to resolve the committee’s questions. Still, this wasn’t a great weekend for Ohio State. In addition to Barrett’s injury, they would have benefited from more chaos ahead of them in the standings. The Buckeyes could beat Wisconsin and still be left out.Baylor (23 percent chance). The Big 12 doesn’t play a championship game, but the Bears, will have the chance to impress the committee as they’ll face a challenging opponent in Kansas State next weekend. Still, it may be wishful thinking to expect Baylor to suddenly leap ahead of TCU or other teams in the rankings. The committee, to the extent it evaluates head-to-head performance, seems to have decided that Baylor’s win against TCU isn’t enough to outweigh what it sees as TCU’s better resume.Arizona (7 percent chance). This sounds like a real long shot, but it’s partly because the model gives Arizona just a 26 percent chance of beating Oregon. Should they win that game, the Wildcats will have a 27 percent chance of making the playoff, according to the model. The Wildcats might need one or two of the teams ranked ahead of them to lose (in addition to Oregon) to feel great about their chances. Overall, Alabama and TCU were helped the most by the past weekend’s action. Alabama’s chance of winning the national championship — not just making the playoff — is up from 26 percent last week to 32 percent. TCU’s chances improved from 9 percent to 15 percent. read more

Alan Major joins Ohio State mens basketball team in noncoaching role Kyle

Former Charlotte head coach Alan Major, right, hired by Ohio State. Courtesy: TNSAfter three seasons of not meeting expectations, it appears Ohio State coach Thad Matta is bringing back another member of his staff that brought him some of his best teams.Alan Major is returning to Matta’s staff for the 2016 season, but this time in a new role. The team said he will serve the role of director of recruiting and player development.Major has spent plenty of time working under Matta. He was an assistant coach to Matta at Xavier University from 2001 to 2004 and went on to OSU to coach under Matta again. From 2004 to 2010, Major helped to recruit and develop big men. He left after the 2010 season to serve as the head coach of UNC-Charlotte for five seasons where he accumulated a career record of 67-70 before leaving the team due to health issues during the 2014-2015 season.Prior to his time with Matta, Major served as an assistant coach at Cal Lutheran from 1992-95, Pacific from 1995-98, Southern Illinois from 1998-99 and Pacific again from 1999-2000.“Alan has many skills and talents above and beyond those he’s utilized as a coach over the years,” Matta said in an email. “I want him to help us develop a complete and well-rounded student-athlete. Alan is the perfect fit for this position.”Major is no stranger to developing players. In his vast college basketball career spanning 23 years serving as either assistant coach or head coach, he has coached such players as former OSU first round NBA selections Greg Oden, Mike Conley and Evan Turner as well as former Xavier star and first rounder David West and Pacific No. 1 overall selection Michael Olowokandi. Nearly everywhere he has gone, Major has found success. While Major worked with Matta both at Xavier and OSU, he contributed to a 234-77 record in his nine years. He reached the NCAA a total of seven times, once at Xavier reaching the Final Four (2004) and once going as far as the national championship game (2007). In 2008, the pair won the National Invitation Tournament title.Along with Major, OSU announced that former manager and graduate assistant Kyle Davis has been promoted to the video coordinator position vacated after Jake Diebler left for an assistant coaching job at Vanderbilt.Davis served as recruiting coordinator for the summer until Major was hired. As a graduate assistant in 2015-16, Davis helped the coaching staff with coordinating recruiting visits and preparing nearly all video footage used for game preparation. This is his first coaching job. read more

Blessing in disguise produces Will Lauricellas passion success

Before his fateful back injury, if you had asked New Jersey native and high school quarterback Will Lauricella where he’d be in two years, he wouldn’t have told you he’d be a javelin thrower on the track and field team at Ohio State. When faced with a stress fracture in his lower vertebrae, Lauricella made a life-changing decision. “I decided for my safety not to do football anymore and all my friends were doing track and field so I decided to go out for the team with them,” Lauricella said. “I fell in love with it.” Lauricella made the choice and hasn’t looked back. The freshman placed first at four consecutive meets before finally meeting his match at the Drake Relays in Des Moines, Iowa, on April 29. Lauricella decided to look at the positive side of the losing performance. “The Drake Relays was the biggest learning experience of my life for my javelin career,” he said. “I learned that, to be successful in the javelin in a college career, you just really have to be consistent and throw your marks.” Consistency has defined Lauricella’s performance this season. In all five outings, he’s thrown more than 60 meters. Sophomore teammate Aaron Roberts is impressed with what’s he’s seen from Lauricella. “Obviously, he’s off to a great start to his career,” Roberts said. “He won his first three or four meets and that’s really awesome. … For a freshman to come in and really help us out like that is a huge benefit for our team, and he’s set himself up for a great four years here.” When Lauricella arrived, there was much discussion that he may be redshirted. However, Lauricella’s throws impressed his coach so much that they decided to start him as a true freshman. “We were going to redshirt him, but he was looking so good in practice we decided, ‘Let’s just throw him in,’” coach Robert Gary said. Even Lauricella wasn’t entirely sure he was ready to face top collegiate competition. “We were talking about redshirting at first,” Lauricella said. “I only have a couple years under my belt of this, but the fact that I have such a good chance to even win Big Tens or score high is just great so far. I never thought I’d be at this point.” Gary was confident Lauricella was ready to perform. “We just thought, ‘Let’s not waste it; let’s let him go,’” Gary said. Going into the Big Ten Outdoor Championships, Lauricella is ranked fourth among Big Ten javelin throwers. But his sights are set on taking first place this weekend. “I’m hoping for one to three, but I really think if I throw my best and the competition throws the way they’ve been throwing, I should be shooting for one or two,” Lauricella said. But no matter where he places, Lauricella said he’s happy with his first season at OSU. “I would say being injury-free and winning my first couple meets in college was the most rewarding part,” he said. “I never would have thought that I could come in and be so successful.” In his first season, Lauricella planted firm roots within the track and field program. He’s developed a unique bond with his coaches, and Gary likes to give his thrower a hard time. “I call him ‘Jersey Shore’ guy,” Gary said. “You know, always tan, hair always looks good.” When Lauricella’s father posted his son’s nickname as “Will the thrill,” Gary had to poke fun. “Everyone keeps giving me a lot of stuff for this nickname,” Lauricella said. “To be honest, it’s really not my nickname. My dad put it up there and coach Gary found it, and they’ve been calling me it since. … They like to make fun of me for it, but I’m starting to embrace it.” In his time at OSU, Lauricella’s performance has surprised even himself. Always a hard worker, Lauricella said he knows he has had help along the way. “I really have to thank my high school coach and the professional help I got during high school also,” he said, “but none of this would have been possible without coach (Kevin) Mannon and everything that he’s taught me since I got to Ohio State.” Lauricella is still learning, and feels his best is still to come. Although he’s a long way from New Jersey, Lauricella says he feels at home at OSU. “It’s absolutely a whole different world,” he said. “I’m used to only seeing populated areas. It’s very nice. It’s very laid-back. It’s much more lax. Everyone’s a lot nicer out here … no complaints about it. I’m very happy where I’m at.” read more

Former Buckeyes linebacker Tyler Moeller moves past pro football dream

Tyler Moeller still remembers No. 1 Ohio State and No. 2 Michigan’s 2006 battle in Ohio Stadium. He said he never imagined his college memories would be the last of his football career. “I just can’t forget my freshman year – the excitement of winning the game and everyone storming the field and taking the grass of the field because we were going to turf the next year,” Moeller said. “Thousands of people holding up big chunks of grass over their head like they just conquered the world.” The possibility of an NFL career for the former OSU safety and linebacker was taken from him after he was allegedly attacked at a bar while with his family in St. Petersburg, Fla., on July 26, 2009. He suffered a fractured skull and a serious brain injury. “It was hard for Tyler. He is so high-strung, so if he wasn’t out there playing, he didn’t feel like he was a part of the team. So really it was as much as us trying to get Tyler back just to be around his friends,” OSU defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell told The Lantern. “By nature, if he’s not playing, he doesn’t feel comfortable. I think that was most difficult.” Moeller returned for the 2010 season, but his troubles did not end there. Moeller suffered a pectoral injury five games into the 2010 season after already missing nearly two seasons. Fickell said Moeller was physically behind but mentally ready to start playing again. “I think that was the biggest thing, to see if he really, truly was back, because sometimes when you’re not being yourself, coming off of injuries of different sorts, you’re vulnerable to more injuries because you’re not playing like you normally do, puts you in almost more harm,” Fickell said. Moeller came back during the 2011 season for the Buckeyes and accumulated a total of 44 tackles and one interception. After the season, Moeller began training for the NFL Draft, but he ultimately accepted a medical sales position with VWR International, a chemical and laboratory supplier headquartered in Radnor, Pa., four weeks into the process. “It was one of the toughest decisions I have had to make because one, so many injuries, first with the head injury then the chest, my body physically was just a wreck. It’s still a wreck now,” Moeller said. “I feel fine now, but I don’t want that to affect me in 10 or 20 years and have it come back to haunt me.” Dr. Paul Gubanich is a team physician for OSU Sports Medicine and an assistant clinical professor of internal medicine at OSU. Gubanich previously worked with professional football players as a member of the Cleveland Browns’ medical staff from 2004-2010. Gubanich cited head injuries that players receive during their careers as a continuing issue throughout their retirement. “Right now, people are having issues down the road, consequences decades later,” Gubanich said. “There is evidence with athletes who have three or more concussions are likely to become depressed or suffer other cognitive problems. And there are retired NFL players that are looking at mental health diseases after playing.” Moeller said many wanted him to continue playing, but he knew it wasn’t what was best for his body. “It was junior year of high school, I knew I wanted to play for a big-time college, ” Moeller said. “In college, I wanted to do whatever I could do to get to the next level.” Moeller said that he is enjoying his life after OSU football. “Everything’s so convenient out here,” Moeller said. “I have a Whole Foods about 200 feet away from me, so everything is just so close.” Fickell said one of the hardest things for players is realizing when it’s time to move on, but seeing Moeller develop other interests while finishing his OSU career was the transformation he needed. “That’s the one thing you miss when you see guys transition from football to whatever you want to call the real world – moving on and changing what they have a passion for,” Fickell said. “Sometimes, guys are still holding on to the game of football – you saw Tyler transform and hopefully he’ll be successful because he is such a passionate person.” read more

Hitzfeld believes that Kovac or Favre will coach Bayern

first_imgJupp Heynckes is likely to quit Bayern Munich at the end of the ongoing season and the club has to look for a possible replacement – and Ottmar Hitzfeld believes that Niko Kovac or Lucie Favre would be the right choices.Niko Kovac used to play for Bayern Munich and he is current coach of Eintracht Frankfurt – to be added, he also coached Croatia national team in the World Cup 2014 in Brazil. Lucien Favre managed to lead Nice successfully to the European cups the previous season from the Ligue 1.The former Bayern Munich coach spoke about possible replacements of Heynckes, according to Sports Keeda:“The expectations with Croatia were huge. Kovac showed great games with the team at the [2014] World Cup,” Hitzfeld told Sport Bild.rb leipzig, bayern munichReport: Bayern are held by Leipzig George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Bayern Munich was held to another draw, this time by RB Leipzig.Bayern Munich finds themselves in the unfamiliar position of sitting third in the…“Frankfurt are now playing beyond their means, next year [possibly even in] Europe. He was also a Bayern player, he knows how the club works. And he is a strong personality who has a clear mindset and open and honest communication.“Every player is equally important to him. He can motivate and excite the team.“Lucien Favre has already done a good job at German clubs and can play good, offensive football. He is also one who can carry a team, a meticulous coach. Basically, he could work for both [Dortmund and Bayern].”last_img read more

Chelsea contemplating shock swap deal with Morata for AC Milan star

first_imgChelsea’s patience with Alvaro Morata appears to be waning with the club reportedly considering using him in a swap deal involving AC Milan goalkeeper Gianluigi Donnarumma, claims Corriere Dello SportThe Spaniard was signed by Chelsea last summer from Real Madrid for £57m as the replacement for their main forward Diego Costa, who officially rejoined Atletico Madrid in January.After a promising start to life at Stamford Bridge for Morata with seven goals in his first eight games for Chelsea, the 25-year-old’s form quickly faded and he only managed to find the back of the net a further eight times in his next 39 appearances.Morata has now been linked with a return to Juventus this summer, but it is Milan who have emerged as the front-runners for his services.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.The Rossoneri have offered to exchange their teenage goalkeeper Donnarumma for Morata, which is believed to have captured Chelsea’s interest due to the growing uncertainty surrounding Thibaut Courtois’ future.The Belgium international has been heavily linked with a move to Real Madrid this summer and previously spoke of his desire to leave for Spanish capital at some point in the future to be near to his two young children.Courtois has just a year remaining on his contract at Chelsea and the London club may be tempted to sign Donnarumma as a potential replacement.The 19-year-old has been touted as one most promising young goalkeepers in Europe and could become a solid long-term replacement for Courtois.last_img read more

Suspect arrested in connection to sexual assault at Mesa College

first_img March 17, 2018 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Suspect arrested in connection to sexual assault at Mesa College SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Authorities Saturday announced that police have arrested a suspect in connection with Friday’s sexual assault on the campus of San Diego Mesa College.The name of the suspect was not immediately released.At about 1:30 p.m. Friday, a student was walking from the Social & Behavioral Sciences Building to the Learning Resource Center when a man began walking alongside her. When they reached the grassy area outside the LRC, the man attempted to pin the victim down and place his hands down her pants and under her shirt, according to San Diego Community College District police.The student pushed the suspect away and left the area. The man was last seen walking toward the campus’ Student Services Center, police said.Anyone with information about the assault was asked to call police at (619) 531-2000 or Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-TIPS.Campus police remind anyone on campus that emergency call boxes are located in many classrooms, elevators and parking lots and safety escort services are available 24/7 by calling college police at (619) 388-6405. Posted: March 17, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

City Of Soldotna Narrows Down Annexation Zones

first_imgThe Soldotna City Council at their meeting on Wednesday, March 28, agreed to postpone any further discussion on annexation until their council meeting on May 9. Olson: “Last week they finally pulled the trigger on it and said they are going to annex 7 of the 9 areas. The city has a constitutional right to pursue annexation, but the borough residents also have some rights here. We elected you folks, you represent us, the folks that sit on the city council in Soldotna we don’t get to vote for them. Our only request was that they would choose the local option that would allow the people in the affected areas to vote. Instead, they decided to go with the legislative review process, that means there won’t be any voting by the folks in the affected areas.”  City Manager Stephanie Queen spoke at the work session, prior to the meeting, stating that this resolution, if approved, would begin the official annexation process. The postponement allows the council to further address the seven areas of annexation, including removing, or editing the boundaries of some of the areas. The City Council stated the resolution introduced proposes to use the legislative review process when they submit their petition for annexation to the Local Boundary Commission. That means that the overall decision on annexation will not be going to the voters. Brian Olson, the President of Borough Residents Against Annexation testified at the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly on Tuesday, April 3, to try and garner support from the assembly. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The City of Soldotna has considered narrowing down the proposed areas of annexation from seven to nine at their council meeting on March 28. The city plans to focus more studying into the commercial areas, like along K-Beach road, and avoiding more residential areas.last_img read more

Tempers Flare In Alaska Over Governors Oil Check Plan

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — During Republican Mike Dunleavy’s successful run for governor last year, he offered few specifics for his vision of limited government but was clear that Alaska residents should get a full payout from the state’s oil-wealth fund. “Nothing should be off the table,” he said. The dividend provides a financial boost more critical for residents with lower incomes and those in high-cost rural areas. Checks have ranged from about $331 a person in the program’s early years to $2,072 in 2015, the year before it was capped. He’s faced criticism for participating in what some see as friendly venues, including events hosted by the limited government group Americans for Prosperity-Alaska, which asked people to register in advance and reserved the right to kick out anyone who was disruptive. Some of the gatherings drew protesters; police alleged one woman yelled at the governor in Nome and resisted their commands, but the prosecutor there declined to pursue charges. Jan MacClarence said she and her husband, who are in their 70s, are moving from a state-owned elder-care facility in Anchorage after 3½ years and into an apartment to avoid the budget stress. State officials have proposed rate increases of between 40% and nearly 140% for Pioneer Home residents to reflect costs of care, though they have said no one would be evicted or barred entry based on their ability to pay. Dunleavy argues the state must live within its means. He says spending is the problem, not the dividend, and sees revenue that would come from new or increased taxes as a pathway to more spending. Dunleavy is seeking constitutional changes that include a spending cap, giving voters a say on tax or dividend changes approved by lawmakers and giving the Legislature a say on tax-related voter initiatives. Key senators have begun kicking around the idea of a change in the dividend calculation. Lawmakers in recent years blew through billions of dollars in savings as they struggled to address the deficit. With savings dwindling and disagreement over taxes and continued cuts, they began tapping permanent fund earnings, typically used to pay dividends and fortify the nest-egg fund, to help pay for government last year. This created tension, with the decades-old dividend, widely considered an entitlement, seen as competing against other programs for funding. “The governor’s looking at any kind of pool of money he can try and grab, and it’s all going into this dividend promise that he made,” Kelty said. “I don’t think that’s right.” Dunleavy has proposed sweeping cuts, including potentially selling a state museum; idling Alaska’s ferry fleet while the future of that service, critical to many coastal communities, is debated; slashing health and social service programs; shifting costs to local governments; and cutting the University of Alaska system budget by an amount nearly equivalent to the cost of running two of its three flagship campuses. Roger Stone, a Dunleavy supporter from Ketchikan, doesn’t agree with everything Dunleavy proposed but sees his budget as a wake-up call that something’s got to give. Alaska has no personal income or state sales tax. He hasn’t said if he would accept a smaller dividend, or how heavily he’ll wield his veto power. He said he’s willing to use “every tool available to make sure we have our fiscal house in order.” But now that he’s governor, residents are learning what it will take to pay a full dividend, and many don’t like their options. A new law that seeks to limit what can be taken from fund earnings calls for a withdrawal of $2.9 billion for the coming budget year for both dividends and government expenses. Paying a full dividend for 2019 alone would take $1.9 billion. That doesn’t include any back-payment. Some see this as a manufactured crisis that doesn’t consider potential new or increased taxes and too highly prizes the annual checks over education and other government services.center_img Frank Kelty, the mayor of Unalaska, a community of about 4,300 along the far-flung Aleutian Islands that is home to one of the nation’s busiest fishing ports, likens Dunleavy’s quest to pay a full dividend to President Donald Trump’s push for a U.S.-Mexico border wall. “I think that they need to take a hard look at what’s really necessary in state government,” Stone said of lawmakers. Once that happens, he said he’s willing to have a lower dividend, seeing that as preferable to a sales or income tax. Dunleavy’s call for paying the full amount this year, around $3,000 each, plus what they missed out on the past three years, was a centerpiece of his campaign. The state wants to hire a consultant to recommend “reshaping” the system and reducing its costs. Dunleavy has expressed openness to keeping some runs going while that process plays out, but no boats are currently set to sail past Oct. 1. MacClarence said being on their own and using food delivery and personal care services as needed is better than worrying every year about what lawmakers might do. Former state Sen. Rick Halford unsuccessfully sued Walker for roughly halving the amount available for dividends in 2016 and agrees with Dunleavy’s effort to pay a full dividend. But he said it isn’t a full debate when options such as taxes on oil and other resources aren’t being considered. As lawmakers have held hearings around the state on Dunleavy’s budget proposals, the governor has begun traveling to make his case. The formula for calculating the amount residents receive from Alaska Permanent Fund earnings is set in state law, based on an average of the fund’s income over five years. Starting in 2016, former Gov. Bill Walker and the lawmakers capped the yearly dividend, at $1,022, $1,100 and $1,600. A full dividend this year would be roughly $2,900 to $3,100. Community meetings and some budget hearings held by lawmakers have drawn big crowds. Hundreds spoke against cuts to the ferry system, a thoroughfare for coastal communities not connected to the mainland road system. Lawmakers and Dunleavy’s predecessor kept the annual checks at $1,600 or less the past few years as they struggled to address a budget deficit that has persisted amid low to middling oil prices and is now estimated at $1.6 billion. Many residents of small southeast Alaska communities travel by ferry with their cars to the bigger city of Juneau to buy supplies at places like Costco, or fly there and take the ferry home. Walt Weller, the mayor of Pelican, a town of about 70 people 70 miles (113 kilometers) west of Juneau, called the ferry a lifeline. “When you’re out here at the end of everything — I mean no roads, float planes only — 100% weather-dependent, we’re pretty doggone dependent on that ferry,” Weller said. He acknowledges people choose to live there but said the ferries — even with limited runs — have helped make that possible. “To have people claim that they’re going to give everybody giant (dividend) checks and then rip our road out from underneath us is fairly upsetting,” he said.last_img read more

Zedd Announces Tour With Jax Jones

first_img Zedd Announces Tour With Jax Jones Email Facebook “Insanely excited to show you this brand new tour !!!!” the GRAMMY-winning DJ tweetedJennifer VelezGRAMMYs May 1, 2019 – 3:49 pm GRAMMY-winning DJ/producer Zedd has announced a tour that will take him and DJ Jax Jones across parts of the U.S. and Europe.The Zedd Orbit tour will kick off in Seattle on Sept. 13 then head to Houston, Atlanta and Minneapolis as well as other cities before going to London in November.  https://twitter.com/Zedd/status/1123588070681350149 News Zedd Announces Tour With Jax Jones zedd-announces-tour-jax-jones Twitter “Insanely excited to show you this brand new tour !!!!” Zedd tweeted. The DJ was recently announced as one of the acts at the Life Is Beautiful festival happening in September in Las Vegas. His latest single, “365,” features GRAMMY-nominated pop star Katy Perry. Fans can register for presale tickets at the Tunespeak website. New L.A. Recording Studio Residency To Help Develop Emerging Artistslast_img read more

Khashoggi murder outcry threatens USSaudi ties

first_imgSaudi Arabia`s consulate is pictured from a skyscraper in Istanbul`s Levent district, Turkey on 10 October 2018. Reuters File PhotoThe outcry in the United States demonising Saudi Arabia over the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul threatens US-Saudi strategic ties, the former Saudi intelligence minister warned on Wednesday.”We value our strategic relationship with the United States and hope to sustain it. We hope the United States reciprocates in kind,” royal family member Prince Turki bin Faisal al Saud said in an address to the National Council on US-Arab Relations, a non-profit advocacy organisation.Turki, to whom Khashoggi once served as an adviser, has also served as an ambassador to London and Washington. His speech denouncing what he called “the demonisation of Saudi Arabia” clearly carried Riyadh’s imprimatur, as he heads an Islamic research center named after his father, the late King Faisal.Turki’s address came after Istanbul’s chief prosecutor on Tuesday said that Khashoggi was suffocated in a premeditated killing and his body was then dismembered.Khashoggi, who lived in self-imposed exile in the United States, wrote columns for the Washington Post critical of the kingdom’s de facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.Some US lawmakers have accused the crown prince of ordering Khashoggi’s death – a charge that Riyadh denies – and threatened sanctions. US commentators have strongly condemned the kingdom.Recalling that more than 70 years of US-Saudi ties survived previous crises, Turki said, “Nowadays, this relationship is once again threatened.””The tragic and unjustified” slaying of Khashoggi “is the theme of today’s onslaught and demonisation of Saudi Arabia in the same fashion as the previous crises. The intensity and gleefulness of it is equally unfair,” he said. “Subjecting our relationship to this issue is not healthy at all.”Turki reiterated that the kingdom is committed to bringing to justice those responsible for Khashoggi’s murder “and whoever else failed to uphold the law.”The Trump administration is demanding full accountability from Riyadh in Khashoggi’s death. In what it called a first step, it revoked the visas of some Saudi officials implicated in the slaying.The US-Saudi relationship “is too big to fail,” Turki said.Those ties, he noted, transcend oil production, trade, arms sales and investment to cooperation on Middle East peace efforts, stabilising oil markets, fighting extremism and containing Iran, the kingdom’s main regional foe.last_img

Blue colour of the soul

first_imgThe Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre has organised an exhibition of spiritual paintings titled Planetary Consciousness by Hungarian artist Jeno Balogh that starts on 23 September.  The exhibition will be inaugurated by Prof. Om Prakash Sharma, artist, Former Principal of Delhi College of Art, New Delhi.Balogh expressed, ‘My paintings depict a world without people, warning that this is going to happen if we continue this way of exploitation to the Earth. I mostly paint with blue colour that is the colour of Planet Earth and also the colour of soul. However, I also use red that is the colour of Mars, a lifeless planet. For me painting is a token of energy, coming from my soul.’ Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Jeno Balogh has  been painting for over 40 years now. He was the President of the local Art Association for 23 years and organised several charity exhibitions. He had a number of solo and group exhibitions in Hungary and abroad like Montevideo, Santiago de Chile, Rio de Janeiro, New Delhi. In Athens, he was awarded with a bronze medal at the Cultural Olympics. He is also a member of the International Artists’ Association and the Association of Greek Artists. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘Save our Planet and Planetary Consciousness’ are the mottos that my art work is focused on. We have one planet only where we should live in an environment-conscious way and in peace to protect our Planet Earth. In order to be able to implement this consciousness in our daily life, one should have a mindful soul which, I think, people don’t possess anymore,’ explained Balogh. When: 23 September – 17 October Where: Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre, 1-A Japath Timing: 10 am – 4 pm (weekdays only)last_img read more