10 months agoChelsea No2 Zola: Ampadu has very important future here

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea No2 Zola: Ampadu has very important future hereby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea No2 Gianfranco Zola admits they’re delighted with the progress of Ethan Ampadu.Ahead of facing FA Cup opponents Nottingham Forest today, Zola discussed the teen.Ampadu committed his future to Stamford Bridge in September with a new five-year deal and assistant manager Zola stated he is highly rated at the club.The Blues legend said: “Ampadu is… when we spoke about Ampadu, me and a lot of staff, everybody shares the same opinion: he’s going to become an important player for this club.”He has intelligence, he has attitude. He has all the, in my opinion, qualities to become a top player. As a staff we value him a lot and when there is an opportunity he will get time.” last_img read more

Wisconsin’s Nigel Hayes Refuses To Talk About Kentucky, Cites What Happened To West Virginia’s Daxter Miles

first_imgNigel Hayes won't discuss Kentucky during press conference.Nigel Hayes is a smart young man. Following Wisconsin’s Elite Eight victory against Arizona, the Badgers’ sophomore forward was asked about Kentucky, his team’s potential opponent in the Final Four. Hayes, who scored eight points in the West Region final, refused to say anything about the undefeated Wildcats. He cited what happened to West Virginia and victory-guaranteeing Daxter Miles as the reason for his decision to keep quiet. Does Nigel Hayes want Kentucky? “I’m not going to go down that road. A young man tried that a couple days ago, and it didn’t work too well.”— Adam Kilgore (@AdamKilgoreWP) March 29, 2015Hayes knows not to poke the bear. The bear is currently in a dogfight against Notre Dame, though. The Wildcats and the Fighting Irish are tied at halftime, 31-31. The game is being televised on TBS.last_img read more

First Nations poised to challenge Nova Scotias marijuana monopoly

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia First Nations appear poised to take on the province’s marijuana monopoly — including one Mi’kmaq community that has enlisted Olympian Ross Rebagliati to roll out a “seed to sale” cannabis operation.Sipekne’katik First Nation in Indian Brook, N.S., has plans to grow cannabis and sell it directly to consumers, while Millbrook First Nation is considering retail locations, bypassing the provincial Crown corporation slated to control sales once the drug is legal on Oct. 17.The government says selling cannabis from a privately owned storefront will remain illegal in Nova Scotia, but Rebagliati argues that First Nations lands are federal jurisdiction and they are within their rights to set up dispensaries.The disagreement could set the stage for a potential constitutional showdown over cannabis sales.“This is precedent-setting,” Rebagliati, a gold-medal snowboarder, cannabis expert and entrepreneur said in an interview this week after his second visit to the Mi’kmaq community formerly called the Shubenacadie First Nation. “It’s rather unfortunate (the province) is taking that route.”Canada’s provinces and territories have opted for one of three retail models for over-the-counter cannabis sales: Private, public or a hybrid of the two.In Nova Scotia, sales will be government-controlled.“We have said all along that our approach to legalization is through a public health lens and that we will start well-regulated and tightly controlled,” a Department of Justice spokeswoman said in a statement.“At this time, we are not considering a retail model outside of the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation.”The province’s stringent stance doesn’t appear to deter First Nations communities, with the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs indicating it is exploring the economic opportunities of cannabis.Rebagliati said the Mi’kmaq community in Indian Brook has a strong plan, and he’s put together a “gold-medal team” to help them reach their goal.“The model is to go seed to sale and that boosts the margins quite substantially and gives them a competitive edge,” he said from B.C. “They came to me with their ideas and they are super progressive.“First Nations are looking for job opportunities and economic opportunities for their people, and this is a new industry that has a lot of those opportunities and potential for substantial financial gain.”Chief Bob Gloade of Millbrook First Nation said the community has invested in a cannabis company and is considering opening a storefront.“We’re focusing on the retail side of it going forward and we’re working on details in that respect,” he said, adding that for now the community isn’t considering launching its own production.“We’re still looking at a couple of years out before we’ll start seeing the benefits from an economic standpoint … but it will have a significant impact,” Gloade said.Sipekne’katik Chief Michael Sack did not respond to multiple requests for comment, but Rebagliati confirmed that he met with the community leader in March and again this week.Rebagliati founded Ross’ Gold, a medical marijuana business, in 2013. Earlier this year he launched LegacyRR, which focuses on growing cannabis and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.Although he said the details of an agreement between LegacyRR and the Sipene’katik First Nation are still being worked out, he said the Indigenous community’s dispensaries could be branded Mi’kmaq Legacy.McGill University constitutional law professor Mark Walters said the situation raises important and controversial legal and constitutional issues.“Legal conflicts on this point are bound to flare up in many places across Canada,” he said in an email, noting it appears many First Nations are making plans to grow and sell cannabis.Walters said it’s difficult to say whether provinces have the right to prevent First Nations from selling cannabis on reserve.He said the “orthodox” legal answer would be that provincial laws on cannabis sales will apply on reserves, unless a First Nation could show that regulating the sale of cannabis was a custom, practice or tradition integral to its distinctive culture, which might be extremely difficult to do.However, Walters said there’s a strong argument that federal law protects a much broader right to Aboriginal self-government than the courts have so far acknowledged.“There is considerable room here for an interpretation of the law that would acknowledge Indigenous rights of self-government over this issue,” he said.Wayne MacKay, professor emeritus of law at Dalhousie University, called it a “very complex” issue.He said one the strongest arguments for the Mi’kmaq community would be a treaty rights claim to a moderate livelihood under the Supreme Court’s Marshall decision.MacKay added that “the core of their argument would likely be the right of First Nations to manage their own resources as part of their constitutional rights to self government.”last_img read more

Administration easing offshore oil and gas drilling rules

first_imgNEW ORLEANS – The Trump administration is easing rules imposed on offshore oil and gas drilling six years after the nation’s worst offshore oil spill.The decision won immediate praise from an offshore drilling group, but environmentalists said it would increase the risk of future disasters.The changes, which will take effect Dec. 27, come as the administration seeks to expand offshore drilling into areas where it is currently banned and has scrapped an Obama-era policy to protect oceans and the Great Lakes, replacing it with one emphasizing economic growth.A 48-page notice from the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement published Friday in the Federal Register says the agency “has become aware that certain provisions in that rulemaking created potentially unduly burdensome requirements for oil and natural gas production operators … without meaningfully increasing safety of the workers or protection of the environment.”An offshore drilling industry group said it’s a positive step.“The revisions develop a rule that reduces unnecessary burdens placed on industry, while still maintaining world-class safety and environmental protections. We have a rule that is not a safety rollback, but instead incorporates modern technological advances,” Randall Luthi, president of the National Ocean Industries Association, said in a news release.The Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group, said the changes raise the risk of more deadly accidents like the one that killed 11 men on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in 2010 and spewed an estimated 134 million gallons (507 million litres) of oil into waters off Louisiana.The group objected most strongly to dropping a requirement for third-party inspections of offshore drilling safety equipment — something oceans program director Miyoko Sakashita (sah-KAHSH-tah) called one of the biggest recommendations resulting from the Deepwater Horizon spill.The new rules replace that with design testing and documentation by the operator, with independent review and certification if a device is moved to a different location.“In a time when there is this tremendous push to expand offshore oil and gas drilling, if anything we need to be tightening up regulations and making it safer rather than rolling back regulations for industry safety,” she said in a phone interview.“We’ve seen in the past that just allowing the industry to regulate itself is not an effective way to prevent oil spills and protect the safety of workers,” she continued. “So it’s important to have the third-party oversight.”The agency, often referred to by the initials BSEE, said it is keeping “multiple layers of review to ensure safety and environmental protection in the design, installation and testing” of safety systems.“BSEE expects those procedural changes will continue to ensure safety and environmental protection, especially because of the other, more substantive, regulatory requirements applicable to safety equipment design, function, maintenance, and testing that are being retained or enhanced,” it said in a response to comments made to its original proposal last year.The agency said those include requiring most types of safety and pollution prevention equipment to be independently “design-tested” against detailed testing criteria, and requiring such equipment to be made and marked under a quality assurance program meeting standards approved by the agency.last_img read more

Goa CM Sawant proves BJPled govts majority in Assembly

first_imgPanaji: Goa Chief Minister Pramod Sawant Wednesday proved the majority of his BJP-led government in the Assembly, comfortably winning a floor test in the House. Twenty MLAs voted for the motion of confidence in the two-day old government, while 15 opposed it. The special session of the House was convened by Governor Mridula Sinha to conduct the floor test, after Sawant was sworn in as the CM during wee hours of Tuesday. Besides 11 members from BJP, three each from Goa Forward Party, MGP and Independents supported Sawant during the head count conducted in the House. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details The Assembly session was presided over by Deputy Speaker Michael Lobo. All the 14 MLAs of Congress and one from NCP stood up against the motion. After winning the trust vote, Sawant appealed all the members to join hands with him to ensure that developmental work reaches every nook and corner of the state. The change in leadership in the coastal state was necessitated due to the death of then CM Manohar Parrikar on Sunday.last_img read more