CVPS: More than 50 outages in 2008 blamed on felled trees

first_imgCVPS: Use caution when cutting woodMore than 50 outages in 2008 blamed on felled treesRUTLAND, VT – With fuel prices up, many Vermonters are turning to wood heat, and that’s causing a significant number of power outages due to careless tree cutting near power lines.Central Vermont Public Service, Vermont’s largest power company, today urged Vermonters to use caution when cutting trees anywhere near power lines.”From professional loggers to people cutting wood for the first time, we’re seeing a tremendous number of accidents involving tree-cutting and power lines,” CVPS spokesman Steve Costello said. “We urge all Vermonters to use the utmost in caution to prevent power outages, injuries and even death.”More than 50 power outages have occurred this year due to trees accidentally felled onto CVPS power lines. The outages have affected thousands of customers and cost thousands of dollars to repair. More importantly, Costello said a simple accident can have devastating consequences.”While an outage can be repaired, these accidents can lead to severe injuries that can have lifelong impacts, and fatal accidents affect entire families,” Costello said. “We want to reduce the number of these outages, of course, but we’re even more concerned about preventing injuries or deaths that could be avoided.”In one of the most recent incidents, a homeowner in CVPS’s St. Albans District accidentally dropped a tree onto a power line. “The homeowner and several children ignored the fact that they were in grave danger, and persisted in cutting the tree and being in close proximity to the tree, while it was in direct contact with the utility line,” Costello said.”Only by sheer luck was a tragedy avoided,” Costello said. “The homeowner and the children were in grave danger and didn’t even realize it.”CVPS, which plans a special bill insert on the issue in January, issued a series of tips to keep people safe:* Always look carefully for nearby utility lines before cutting any tree. Sometimes, utility lines can be hidden by trees and other vegetation, such as vines. Call CVPS for assistance before cutting down any tree that is in close proximity to a utility line, or if the tree could fall into a utility line.* Always assume all overhead power lines or damaged lines are energized and potentially dangerous, including the service cables that run from utility poles to buildings.* Never climb, touch or attempt to fell a tree that is in contact with a power line.* If a tree falls into a power line, stop working immediately! Do not attempt to remove the saw or any equipment. Do not attempt to clear the tree or any portion of the tree from the downed line. Do not touch the tree or anything in contact with the tree or overhead cables. Shuffle or hop away from the location; always keep both feet in contact with the ground at the same time. Stay clear and call us immediately at 800-649-2877. Never assume that someone else has made to call. Inform us of the exact location of the event.* Keep others at least 50 feet away from the tree and cables until our crew arrives. This includes pets and livestock.last_img read more

France’s ADEME, Japan’s JERA team up to develop 2GW of floating offshore wind capacity

first_imgFrance’s ADEME, Japan’s JERA team up to develop 2GW of floating offshore wind capacity FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享OffshoreWind.biz:Japanese utility JERA, French state-owned investment company ADEME Investissement, and Ideol have teamed up to develop commercial-scale floating offshore wind projects.The parties agreed on the key terms for the establishment of an investment vehicle dedicated to the financing of the development phase of at least 2 GW of projects using Ideol’s Damping Pool technology.According to the three companies, this is planned to be done during the next five years.“We do believe that floating offshore wind is on its way to confirm its potential and become a substantial contributor to achieving future climate goals,” said Arnaud Leroy, CEO of ADEME and president of ADEME Investissement. “This partnership aims at financing first commercial scale projects and at supporting Ideol’s technology as both will contribute to accelerate the competitiveness of floating offshore wind.”The Damping Pool is a ring-shaped floating foundation that Ideol developed and patented and Bouygues Travaux Publics built. It is being used for the Floatgen floating wind project which comprises a 2 MW Vestas V80 turbine installed offshore France. [Nadja Skopljak]More: New French and Japanese co-op targets floating wind projectslast_img read more