Claims of voter fraud are common. It’s the fraud that’s rare.

first_img– Advertisement – Famously, there was the story that Senator Christopher S. Bond, Republican of Missouri, told in 2000 about a 13-year-old springer spaniel that was registered to vote in St. Louis. Mr. Bond was making a case that more anti-fraud protections, like requiring identification, were needed after his colleague, Senator John Ashcroft, lost his seat when more Missourians voted for a dead man: Gov. Mel Carnahan, who had been killed in a plane crash several weeks before the election but remained on the ballot. Mr. Ashcroft did not challenge the results.The fantasy of a stolen election has elements that Mr. Trump has long incorporated into his narrative about himself. There are clear perpetrators (undocumented immigrants, big-city Democratic political machines) and a victim (him) — and usually enough ambiguity so he can float outlandish but unsubstantiated rumors.He has been laying the groundwork for refusing to concede for some time. Speaking in September to Mark Levin, the talk radio and Fox News host, Mr. Trump suggested that some voters were receiving multiple ballots in the mail. He said: “People are saying, ‘Hey, what’s going on? I just got a whole batch of ballots.’” In reality, elections officials across the country, representing both parties, said there was no evidence that fraud had played any role in determining the election outcome this year. The most common claims of voter fraud — reports of ballots cast by someone voting twice, or by a dead person or someone who is otherwise ineligible — can almost always be traced back to a misunderstanding like a typo, a clerical error or a false assumption that two people with a common name are actually the same person, according to the Brennan Center.Still, the topic has been a staple of coverage on Fox News going back to the 2000s, when hosts like Bill O’Reilly spread exaggerated stories about immigrants who were voting illegally, campaigns that paid people for their votes and community groups like ACORN whose employees had submitted fraudulent voter registrations. (The ACORN employees, who were also the subject of an attack ad that John McCain’s campaign ran against Barack Obama in 2008, did not appear to be attempting to influence voting, but rather to get paid for voter registration work they hadn’t actually done.)Claims of voter fraud have often involved absurd and far-fetched scenarios — dead people, dogs, busloads of people of color — which is another way they live on in the public imagination. In recent years, conservative activists have pushed unverified reports that buses full of illegal voters showed up at polling places from California to Wisconsin. As a news story, it is sensational and often irresistible. The Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law examined its enduring appeal in a 2007 report, observing that ballot fraud has “the feel of a bank heist caper: roundly condemned but technically fascinating, and sufficiently lurid to grab and hold headlines.”The subject’s prevalence in the conservative news media, where it is treated as a more widespread problem than the facts show, may help explain how Mr. Trump, a ravenous consumer of cable news, came to be so fixated.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Voter fraud is one of the oldest charges a politician can level in American elections — though no president in modern times has done so with such frequency, and so little evidence, as President Trump. In the 1941 Orson Welles epic “Citizen Kane,” newspapermen huddle near the printing press on election night as it becomes clear that the results won’t be good news for their boss, the publishing mogul Charles Foster Kane.One of them holds up a front page with the headline they had hoped for: “Kane Elected.” He then lowers his head and nods toward the version they have to go with instead. “Fraud at Polls!” it declares. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Syracuse dropped by reigning champion and No. 2 Clarkson, 4-1

first_img Published on January 30, 2018 at 9:47 pm Contact Anthony: amkhelil@syr.edu UPDATED: Jan. 30, 2018 at 10:45 p.m.In Syracuse’s 15 previous matchups against Clarkson, the Golden Knights owned a 13-1-1 record over the Orange. Syracuse hosted Clarkson earlier this season, falling to the Golden Knights, 5-0, at Tennity Ice Pavilion. SU’s only win against CU came back in 2010 in a 3-1 victory.Syracuse (9-16-1, 8-5-1 College Hockey America) traveled to Potsdam to play the reigning national champion and No. 2 Clarkson (24-3-1, 14-2 Eastern College Athletic) on Tuesday night, losing 4-1.Clarkson outshot Syracuse 34-27 on the game. The Golden Knights got on the board first, as Clarkson’s Michaela Boyle scored a goal at the 11:34 mark of the first period. CU tacked on another goal at the 2:16 mark of the first as Loren Gabel netted a shot past Abbey Miller.SU’s lone goal of the game came at the 14:07 mark of the second period, as Stephanie Grossi scored her seventh goal of the season. With the goal, Grossi moves into a tie for first place with Melissa Piacentini on the Syracuse career points list, with 112. Grossi’s success against the Golden Knights comes as no surprise as Grossi now has a goal and two assists in her career against Clarkson.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLess than two minutes after the Orange scored its first goal, the Golden Knights were quick to answer, as Boyle scored her second goal of the game. Clarkson’s fourth goal of the game came late in the third period, ensuring its victory.The Orange proved stout on its penalty kill, not allowing a goal on the Golden Knights’ two power play opportunities. In its last game against conference foe Mercyhurst, SU gave up three power play goals. Abbey Miller continues to be a solid backstop in the net, saving 30 shots, despite giving up four goals in the loss.The Orange does not play again until next week, when it travels to take on in-state rival Cornell on Feb. 6.CORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Potsdam was misnamed. The Daily Orange regrets this error. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

[VIDEO] Gyan grabs 3rd league goal for NorthEast United in draw with Mumbai City

first_imgGhana forward, Asamoah Gyan, got back to his scoring ways for NorthEast United on Wednesday in their 2-2 draw with Mumbai City FC in the Indian Super League.Gyan did not find the net in NorthEast United’s last league game against Hyderabad on November 6 but he struck in the 42nd minute.(Image credit: Indian Super League)He managed to create space for himself away from two Mumbai defenders and fired the ball home to make the score 2-2 and let the teams share the spoils on the day.Trademark Finish ✅Trademark Celebration ✅Check out Hero of the Match @ASAMOAH_GYAN3‘s performance in #NEUMCFC 🌟#HeroISL #LetsFootball #TrueLove pic.twitter.com/1si1p2ehww— Indian Super League (@IndSuperLeague) November 27, 2019The result leaves NorthEast United on 9 points on the table. They are tied with Bengaluru and the two teams are one point off Jamshedpur and ATK are joint top of the Indian Super League table.Gyan’s two previous goals in the league had come against Odisha FC and Goa and his performance against Mumbai City FC got him the Hero of the Match award; his second of the season.The man for the big occasion! 😍@ASAMOAH_GYAN3 is the Hero of the match for #NEUMCFC 👊#HeroISL #LetsFootball #TrueLove pic.twitter.com/XyLhbextv1— Indian Super League (@IndSuperLeague) November 27, 2019last_img read more