Cutting turbulence injuries in half: the real-time connection

first_imgIn recent years, companies have zeroed in on the problem, trying—if not to tame it—at least better forecast C.A.T. so pilots can avoid bumpy areas. The latest advance and most promising is a deal among The Weather Company (an IBM Business) and Gogo Business Aviation. The arrangement will speed the delivery of real-time, turbulence-avoidance information to airline dispatch operations and pilots alike.The companies are able to do this, according to The Weather Company’s President Mark Gildersleeve by, “collecting massive amounts of data very quickly, and then using that insight to provide guidance to all flights that will be traveling through impacted airspace.”The result could spare passengers and crew alike the uncomfortable bumps. Traditionally, flight operations, pilots and aviation meteorologists have received coded verbal reports—reports containing limited information on actual, real-time flight conditions—via pilot reports, or PIREPS. Now, the Weather Company and Gogo say their Turbulence Auto PIREP System (TAPS) can communicate critical en-route weather information far faster, affording pilots a chance at avoiding sometimes-dangerous conditions. The payoff among those who employ the WSI Total Turbulence set-up is, say the two partner companies, a full 50% reduction in turbulence-related injuries and unnecessary maintenance inspections.AirlineRatings will have more on this important story in the near future. Nothing sets passengers’ teeth on edge and induces a fear of flying quite like turbulence, be it the weather-induced variety or C.A.T—clear air turbulence. Each year the nerve-wracking phenomena cost airlines some US$100 million. Turbulence remains the number one cause of non-fatal injuries aloft.Watch this spectacular video of a thunderstorm over Guatemala and South of Mexico. It was taken from a Boeing 767-300 by Noe Castillo of Videos de Aviacion. The thunderstormn action starts at 1.5 minutes in and is amazing.last_img read more

Text Your Friends From Facebook With HeyWire’s New App

first_imgThe Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Another company in the very crowded but very popular messaging space, HeyWire is launching a Facebook app today that will allow users to send both texts and tweets from within Facebook. Like other text-messaging services, HeyWire gives you a real phone number to use in order to send and receive text messages. Messages that are sent also sync with the company’s iOS and Android apps, so you can read and respond via multiple devices. Tags:#Facebook#web There is no per-message charge, but it does cost 20 Facebook Credits per month to hook you up with a U.S. phone number and that unlimited texting access to any mobile phone in the U.S., Canada, Mexico and China and to most phones in the Caribbean and Central and South America. (The iPhone and Android apps are free, but are ad-supported). While 20 Facebook Credits per month isn’t a huge fee, it may be a big hurdle for some people to overcome in order to use this service. After all, if you’re on Facebook, you might just chat with people using Facebook Messaging rather than sending an SMS. Of course, there are a few folks who still aren’t on Facebook.HeyWire recently partnered with Twitter to launch HeyTweet, a service that lets users send tweets for free via SMS. That service seems a lot more practical than this Facebook app. Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… audrey watters A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verificationlast_img read more

Punjab sees increase in farm fires this month

first_imgFarmers continue to burn stubble despite banVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:1501:15  There has been a spike in agricultural fires — a phenomenon that’s known to worsen air pollution — in Punjab in September, significantly more than in the same month last year.Krunesh Garg, member-secretary, Punjab Pollution Control Board, said there were 107 fires from September 24-26. In 2018 there were only 11 fires during the same period. However, in 2016 and 2017 there were 106 and 150 fires respectively from September 27-30.Mr. Garg said last year’s numbers were unusually low because paddy harvesting was delayed due to the persistence of the monsoon. “Last year, the onset of monsoon was late and it persisted well into October. This year, harvesting of basmati varieties of rice has already begun, hence the apparent rise in September,” he said.Agricultural fires, in which farmers set fire to their fields after harvesting paddy, tend to begin around late September and peak around the last week of October by which time farmers have harvested most of their paddy. There were 80,879 fire incidents detected during the paddy harvesting season in 2016, 43,660 in 2017 and about 40,000 in 2018. “There was a 10% reduction last year from 2017 and we expect around the same reduction this year,” Mr. Garg said. Watch | Farmers continue to burn stubble despite bancenter_img Punjab’s fires tend to worsen Delhi’s pollution as particulate matter floats into the city, affecting the already polluted winter air.The Centre and Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh had — over several meetings last year — declared a “zero tolerance” policy on stubble burning by farmers which, according to various studies, contributes anywhere from 17% to 78% to the particulate matter emission load in Delhi during winter.Last year, the Union Agriculture Ministry earmarked ₹591 crore for disbursal to Punjab, Haryana and U.P. to help farmers access machines that collect or plough the stubble back into the soil.A senior official in the Union Agriculture Ministry said in spite of subsidies, the implements were “expensive” for the farmers and thus it was cheaper for them to set chaff ablaze.(With inputs fromPriscilla Jebaraj)last_img read more