Questions abound as Boks lose in Perth

first_imgAttacking approachIn Perth, the Boks’ only try began with a high-up-and-under, which was won by Kirchner, thanks really to the bounce of the ball. Springbok fans want to see more than that. Ball winnerAlso, with Bismarck du Plessis sidelined after being injured against Argentina in Cape Town, the Springboks lost a valuable ball winner in the loose, and the decision to go for a very big loose trio in Perth, without including a true ball winner, proved questionable. Australia’s Michael Hooper, the smallest loose forward on the field in Perth, effected four turnovers. It’s not often that a team manages to come back from 10 points down as the Australians did to beat South Africa, so hats off to them, but the fact that they did that is what makes it so disappointing from a South African perspective, along with the manner in which the Boks played the game. Game planBy sticking to a game plan that brought the Bulls three Super Rugby titles, Meyer’s Springboks have found it far harder to break down the opposition at international level. The tactical kicking game that was previously spearheaded by scrumhalf Fourie du Preez now looks old and tired, and it appears that the Bok backline has little to offer in the way of innovation and excitement. Playing within themselvesIt seems, in many ways, that a clash of styles, brought from the various franchises, is limiting the Boks. They’re playing within themselves and the result is that some established international players who shone in the Super Rugby tournament now appear to be mere shadows of themselves. Patrick LambieIf one is to criticise Meyer, Lambie is an ideal example to do so. He stood out at fullback on the biggest stage of all in 2011, the Rugby World Cup. However, he was played at flyhalf early in the year by the Sharks before being moved back to fullback. Meyer, though, has opted for the steady, but unspectacular Bulls’ number 15, Zane Kirchner, ahead of the undoubtedly more talented Lambie. A first defeat for the Springboks under Heynecke Meyer felt inevitable after three iffy performances in succession, but it was nonetheless disappointing as the Boks gave up a halftime lead before going down 26-19 to the Wallabies in a Castle Rugby Championship match in Perth on Saturday. A good all-round gameThe best rugby they have played in recent times came during the 2007 Rugby World Cup; they combined an uncompromising defence with razor-sharp counter-attacking. They did the basics well and the general at number 10 was not a kicking flyhalf, but Butch James, a man with a good all-round game. There must be a lesson to be learnt from that. In Meyer’s six tests in charge of the Springboks, it should be remembered that the South Africa team looked at its best in the first half of the team’s 36-27 victory over England in the second test in Johannesburg in June. In that first half, the basics were performed well. They played well with the ball in hand, aiming to get it wide, and were rewarded. So, the question is: why has the ambition of the Springboks’ play receded so much since then, or appeared to do so? Is it time to recall Heinrich Brussouw? In 2011, before being injured, he was lauded for his influence on the game. Now he is on the outside looking in. This much is true: he looked very good for the Cheetahs in their narrow loss to Western Province on the weekend. Granted, test rugby is a different animal, more tightly contested than any other games, but isn’t that where subtle skills make all the difference? Shouldn’t we believe the Springboks are capable of more than they’re showing? And another question about the Springboks’ loose forwards: was Keegan Daniel let go too soon? Yes, he is smaller than the South African ideal of what a flanker or eighthman should look like, but his skills are unmatched among loose forwards in the country. He is one of the reasons why the Sharks are able to play such a good and effective counter-attacking style of rugby.center_img Lots of questions, I know, but that’s where the Springboks’ performances leave us, the fans, at present – with more questions than answers. While Kirchner has not let the Boks down, his ceiling is much lower than that of Lambie, who came off the bench for the first time in three games on Saturday. To match up to teams like the world champion All Blacks, who are South Africa’s next opponents by the way, the Springboks need their most talented players on the park. It didn’t really work for the Bulls in this year’s Super Rugby competition; they finished sixth on the log and were beaten in their first playoff game. The Stormers topped the log with a defensive-minded approach, but they never once earned a bonus point for scoring four tries in a game and that defensive approach it was found wanting by the Sharks in the playoffs. One of the scapegoats for South Africa’s poor performances has been flyhalf Morne Steyn, especially as his goal kicking has been below his usually immaculate standard. He offers less than Patrick Lambie on the attack, with Lambie good at taking the ball flat, while rising star Johan Goosen is as talented a player as anyone in the game, but he has only recently returned from a long injury layoff. The most inventive and attacking of the South African franchises, the Sharks made it to the final. Their style of play, more integrated than that of the other South African franchises, matched up best to the challenge of Australian and New Zealand opposition when the chips were down. 10 September 2012 A man like Kirchner won’t let the team down, but he is not a potential difference maker and match winner like Lambie is. And that is what is needed against the best opposition. When Goosen is fit, let him loose at flyhalf. Where they stood out most was in their ability to offload in the tackle and keep attacking movements alive. It’s something that has been relatively scarce in the Springboks’ approach. They want to see the ball run, especially as South African conditions are so conducive to it. They want to see the physicality of the players used not only to try and run over the opposition, but also around them, or to slice through them. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Solar Decathlon 2011: Team Massachusetts’ 4D Home

first_imgLive at the International Builder’s ShowProject manager Spencer Culhane tells GBA that Team Massachusetts – a collaboration of students and faculty at Massachusetts College of Art and Design and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell – has designed 4D Home to perform to the Passivhaus standard. The stick-frame walls will be insulated to R-56.6 with 4 in. of closed-cell spray foam and 7 in. of blown-in fiberglass. The roof will be framed with 14-in. Nordic prefabricated I-joists and insulated to R-64.4 with 4 in. of spray foam and 10 in. of blown-in fiberglass. Zip System sheathing will be used on the exterior surfaces. The PV array as a source of shade and electric power Rather than mounting photovoltaic panels on the building’s standing-seam metal roof, the team has designed a trellis that raises the 6.7 kW (386 sq. ft.) Sunpower array above the south-facing roof surface, enhancing ventilation under the panels and shading the roof and (with the trellis assembly’s overhang) the front of the building during the warm months. MORE INFORMATION Team Massachusetts Web page DOE Web page for Team Massachusetts Team Massachusetts Facebook page GBA Resource Guide for 2011 Solar Decathlon Culhane points out that the team is using a SunDrum flat-plate solar thermal collector that attaches to the back of the array to both cool the panels and generate hot water. The house is also equipped with a dehumidifier and a heat pump for space heating and cooling. Aside from a Roto Frank skylight that will be mounted near the middle of the north side of the roof, Makrown 88 triple-glazed windows will be used throughout. A test build in Boston The team, about 60 people in all, is set to build its 4D Home this summer in Boston’s Marine Industrial Park, test it for further improvements, and then begin deconstructing the building for transport to the National Mall. Culhane says the thermal envelope will ship in four sections, with the decking, which will be flat-packed, shipped separately. Based on the team’s last cost estimate, the home is currently priced at $260,000. Culhane adds, however, that “we are making design refinements to bring that number down to $250K for the competition.” After the competition, the team plans to sell the home and, as noted in a recent Boston Globe article, is already talking to prospective buyers. One of the key design variables in Team Massachusetts’ Solar Decathlon entry, 4D Home, is the configuration of its interior, which, with the repositioning of two sliding partitions, can be quickly altered to accommodate a variety of situations, from a dinner party attended by several guests to a permanent addition to the family. “The 4D Home is about a home that works in the fourth dimension, which is over time. Our target market is a family of three, preferably with a young child, and the idea is that this house can transform with the family over time and adapt to a family’s changing needs,” Evon Calabrese, an architectural designer from Massachusetts College of Art and Design, told Fine Homebuilding’s Justin Fink at the International Builders’ Show in January. With its gabled roof, 4D Home, at just under 1,000 sq. ft., takes a cue from New England’s traditional rural architecture, but its construction and performance goals are based on thoroughly contemporary precepts of energy efficiency and affordability.last_img read more

The Cameras and Lenses Behind the Scenes of HBO’s Original Series

first_imgCurious about the cameras used to shoot current hit HBO series? Here are the various camera packages and the series using them.For decades, HBO has set countless standards for the rest of the television world, one being the final look of their Original Series. The cable giant has long relied on film standards to elevate their television productions. Their major blockbuster series, Game of Thrones, is no exception.Take a look at what goes into shooting an HBO show.Game of ThronesGame of Thrones set via HBO / ARRI.The Game of Thrones series has primarily relied on the ARRI ALEXA but will, occasionally, use other cameras for VFX-heavy sequences or specialty setups. Fun fact: the ALEXA used in the first season was actually a prototype, as the camera had not yet been officially released.Game of Thrones Camera Package:ARRI ALEXAARRI ALEXA MiniRED EPIC DRAGON (of course it was a dragon!)LensesCooke S4Angenieux Optimo All images via HBO.Looking for more industry coverage? Check out these articles.SXSW Panel: How to Get People to Care About Your Film7 Master Cinematography Techniques from Iconic DirectorsThe Secrets Behind Apollo 11’s Success Are a Story All Their OwnInsights into the Cinematography of the Award-Winning Doc-Series “Tales By Light”Industry Interview: The Composers Behind American Gods In his interview with Mandy, Veep cinematographer David Miller shared this wonderful tidbit:[It] was interesting because there was no rhyme or reason as to the way Veep was laid out. It was kind of chaotic, there was no staging.On the first day, they rehearsed the material for a long time. They were like, “Great, okay, we’re going to go now. Light it.” I’m like, “Wait a second, we’re not quite done.” So, I said we had to change some of the blocking, to make it work. They were so used to doing whatever they wanted. I said, “Well no, you’ve got to say that line here, don’t make that false move, say the line and then move away, but don’t go to this side, go to the other side of the room,” and all that.Julia was a little bit reticent, at the beginning. She said, “You’re trying to control us.” I said, “Well no, I’m just trying to lay it out photographically, so it can all play in one, big thing.” After about a week, when they started to realize: everything cuts together now — everybody’s looking the right direction — the lighting looks so much better. They were like, “Ok, we get it.”In the end, the funny thing is, after changing most of it, and going through it, I won the Emmy.Miller went on to say more:Even though it’s documentary [style], it doesn’t have to look bad. There’s a way to make it work, and it really comes down to all of the staging. Figuring out the staging so that everything falls into place. It’s pretty simple to do, but you just have to be willing to do it.Take a peek at the set, in this behind-the-scenes video. BarryImage via HBO.Barry Camera Package:ARRI ALEXA MiniOptimo zooms, 15-49, 28-76, and 45-120Leica SummiluxDirector Alec Berg with DP Paula Huidobro. Image via John P. Johnson / HBO.In an interview with IndieWire, DP Paula Huidobro stated the following:We chose ALEXA because of the natural and beautiful skin tone rendition of the camera, and also, because of its exposure latitude. I wanted the light to be as soft as possible and my gaffer, Paul Mclevine, and I decided to go with a more old-school approach, using Fresnels, booklights, and Chinese lanterns, instead of the LED technology, which is now the norm. We liked the warmth of the source and glowy quality it would have on the actors’ faces. We had big sources through the windows, with 20Ks set on motors that were easily adjusted. I like soft sources, but keeping the light shaped in an interesting way. I didn’t ever want to drift into flat, comedic lighting.WestworldImage via John P. Johnson/HBO.“Doesn’t look like anything to me.”Westworld Camera Package:ARRICAM ST and LTARRIFLEX 235 (drone)LensesARRI Master PrimesAngenieux Optimo zooms VeepImage via HBO.As Veep cinematographer David Miller says, “Even though it’s documentary [style], it doesn’t have to look bad.”Veep Camera Package:Arri Alexa PlusLensesCooke S4Angenieux Optimo True DetectiveTrue Detective season three set via HBO.It should be no surprise that, with the wildly different seasons, True Detective has relied on different cameras for each season. Seasons 1 and 3 were captured on Panavision cameras, while Season 2 went with an ARRI.True Detective Camera Package:Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL2 (Season 1)Panavision PrimoPVintage LensesFilm used: 35 mm (Kodak Vision3 50D 5203, Vision3 500T 5219) InsecureImage via Justina Mintz / HBO.Insecure Camera Package:ARRI ALEXA MiniCooke S5i lensesIn their interview with IndieWire, DP Patrick Cady said the following:The show is very location-based, and the shallow depth of field, on a wider lens, can bring about that moment where you know where the characters are, but they are still lifted off of the background. Their story is in a place, but it connects to all of us, in our worlds, because we are concentrating on the wonderful cast. I think it helps the audience feel connected to the show. The ALEXA has a wonderful sensor. I don’t think I’ve ever been disappointed in it, and it did a great job of handling the color palette of the Kiss ’n Grind party — a key part of the “Hella LA” Episode — as well as, the hard LA sunlight.More reading on the production of Insecure:Keeping ‘Insecure’ lit: HBO cinematographer Ava Berkofsky on properly lighting black faces — MicInsecure DP Ava Berkofsky on Avoiding “Seinfeld Shots,” Faking Coachella and Lighting Mega-Churches — Filmmaker Magazinecenter_img 35 mm film (Kodak 5203 50D, 5207 250D, and 5219 500T)Image via John P. Johnson/HBO.Westworld cinematographer John Grillo revealed the following in his interview with IndieWire:The opportunity to shoot on film doesn’t come often, so when I was hired for Season 2 of Westworld, I was both excited and a bit nervous, as I had not used it in a long while. That nervousness disappeared when I started watching dailies. Not only was the latitude of the film mind-blowing, but the one thing I noticed right away, that I hadn’t seen for the longest time shooting digital, was the exquisite way that film renders skin tones. The color and texture were just right. We shot a lot of day exteriors in harsh sunlight. Film brought another dimension to the landscape, and our characters’ close-ups. You could feel the softness of Dolores’s skin; you could almost touch every line on the Man in Black’s face. With digital, it can be a struggle under those conditions and subject to myriad of interpretations in color correction, but film is unique.Westworld is also believed to be the first production to shoot on 35 mm film with a drone. In an interview with Filmmaker Magazine, DP Darran Tiernan had the following to say:There’s a great company from Australia called XM2 that Paul Cameron and A-cam operator Chris Haarhoff used when they worked together on the last Pirates of the Caribbean film. They said it was amazing, because sometimes on those pirate ships, they couldn’t get a crane where they wanted and the XM2 guys would set up the drone and, basically, do a crane shot with the drone.For our shots, we flew an [Arriflex] 235, which used 200 foot rolls. So, you’ve only got about a minute and 50 seconds worth of runtime per roll, which is a bit nerve-wracking. John Grillo shot Episode 10, and I believe by that time, XM2 had developed a system that allowed them to use the [Arriflex] 435, in the drone. There’s still aerial helicopter stuff, this season, that Jonah and Paul shot in Utah, which is beautiful. But we did drone work, as well, which is cheaper than the cost of having an aerial unit.More reading on Westworld’s production:“There Is a Reverence On Set When the Camera is Spitting Film Through its Gate”: DP Darran Tiernan on Westworld, Season Two —Filmmaker Magazine‘Westworld’ DP Paul Cameron: A Camera Is Just Another Film Stock  — VarietyHBO’s ‘Westworld’: Cinematographer Paul Cameron on Getting ‘Fearless Coverage’ on 35mm Film — No Film SchoolVideo – Westworld: “First ever use of a [35mm] film camera on a drone” — Reddit More reading on True Detective filming:The Lenses Make the Look on True Detective — PanavisonHow we got the shot: Cary Fukunaga on True Detective’s tracking shot — The GuardianHow True Detective’s Cinematographer Got These 9 Shots — VultureGet a glimpse of the Season 3 set from HBO. Panavision Millennium DXL (Season 3)Panavision Primo, Primo Zoom and Ultra Speed Z-Series MKII Lenses In regards to the look of the series, one of the shows first DPs Alik Sakharov revealed the following:The tone of this series had to be a little bit more expansive than most TV shows. We didn’t want it to feel claustrophobic. We were, basically, trying to explore as many filmic possibilities as we could, and structure shots to create the depth and breadth of a feature film. I, also, explored the idea of under-lighting certain scenes, which allowed us to concentrate the eye on where the action is happening, as opposed to lighting everything in one, big wash of light. I have to say that the ALEXA was instrumental in getting this stuff. I never thought I would be singing praises to HD technology, and yet, there I was — utterly enamored by it.As for the scenes using RED cameras, certain Iceland locations in Season 4 were unsafe for Steadicam operators. Cinematographer Robert McLachlan and crew turned to the carbon fiber 6K RED EPIC DRAGON, since the camera was light enough to be used with Freefly MoVI M10 rigs.More great reads on Game of Thrones production:Game of Thrones’ cinematographer breaks down the ‘dragon-induced Armageddon’ in The Spoils of War — The VergeALEXA wins the “Game of Thrones” — ARRIDRAGONs on the set of Game of Thrones — RED Director Alex Graves Talks Shooting the “Purple Wedding” — ColliderFor additional camera work, check out this behind-the-scenes look at Season 6. ARRI ALEXA XT Plus (Season 2)Panavision B-, C-, E-, G-Series and ATZ Lenseslast_img read more

Amputation- traumatic

first_imgDefinitionTraumatic amputation is the loss of a body part — usually a finger, toe, arm, or leg — that occurs as the result of an accident or injury.Alternative NamesLoss of a body partConsiderationsIf an accident or trauma results in complete amputation (the body part is totally severed), the part sometimes can be reattached, especially when proper care is taken of the severed part and stump.In a partial amputation, some soft-tissue connection remains. Depending on the severity of the injury, the partially severed extremity may or may not be able to be reattached.There are various complications associated with amputation of a body part. The most important of these are bleeding, shock, and infection. See also: WoundsThe long-term outcome for amputees has improved due to better understanding of the management of traumatic amputation, early emergency and critical care management, new surgical techniques, early rehabilitation, and new prosthetic designs. New limb replantation techniques have been moderately successful, but incomplete nerve regeneration remains a major limiting factor.Often, the patient will have a better outcome from having a well-fitting, functional prosthesis than a nonfunctional replanted limb.CausesTraumatic amputations usually result directly from factory, farm, or power tool accidents or from motor vehicle accidents. Natural disasters, war, and terrorist attacks can also cause traumatic amputations.SymptomsA body part that has been completely or partially cut offBleeding (may be minimal or severe, depending on the location and nature of the injury)Pain (the degree of pain is not always related to the severity of the injury or the amount of bleeding)Crushed body tissue (badly mangled, but still partially attached by muscle, bone, tendon, or skin)First AidadvertisementCheck the persons airway (open if necessary); check breathing and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing, CPR, or bleeding control.Try to calm and reassure the person as much as possible. Amputation is painful and extremely frightening.Control bleeding by applying direct pressure to the wound. Raise the injured area. If the bleeding continues, recheck the source of the bleeding and reapply direct pressure, with help from someone who is not tired. If the person has life-threatening bleeding, a tight bandage or tourniquet will be easier to use than direct pressure on the wound. However, using a tight bandage for a long time may do more harm than good.Save any severed body parts and make sure theystay with the patient. Removeany dirty material that can contaminate the wound, if possible.Gently rinse the body part if the cut end is dirty.Wrap the severed part in a clean, damp cloth, place it in a sealed plastic bag and place the bag in ice cold water.Do NOT directly put the body part in water without using a plastic bag.DoNOT put the severed part directly on ice. Do NOT use dry ice as this will cause frostbite and injury to the part.If cold water is not available, keep the part away from heat as much as possible. Save it for the medical team, or take it to the hospital. Cooling the severed part will keep it useable for about 18 hours. Without cooling, it will only remain useable for about 4 to 6 hours.Keep the patient warm.Take steps to prevent shock. Lay the person flat, raise the feet about 12 inches, and cover the person with a coat or blanket. Do NOT place the person in this position if a head, neck, back, or leg injury is suspected or if it makes the victim uncomfortable.Once the bleeding is under control, check the person for other signs of injury that require emergency treatment. Treat fractures, additional cuts, and other injuries appropriately.Stay with the person until medical help arrives.Do NotDo NOT forget that saving the persons life is more important than saving a body part.Do NOT overlook other, less obvious, injuries.Do NOT attempt to push any part back into place.Do NOT decide that a body part is too small to save.Do NOT place a tourniquet, unless the bleeding is life threatening, as the entire limb may be harmed.Do NOT raise false hopes of reattachment.Call immediately for emergency medical assistance ifIf someone severs a limb, finger, toe, or other body part, you should call immediately for emergency medical help.PreventionUse safety equipment when using factory, farm, or power tools. Wear seat belts when driving a motor vehicle. Always use good judgment and observe appropriate safety precautions.ReferencesHalluska-Handy M. Management of amputations. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:chap 47.advertisementLyn ET, Mailhot T. Hand. In: Marx JA, ed. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2009:chap 47.Gross KR, Collier BR, Riordan WP Jr, Morris JA Jr. Wilderness trauma and surgical emergencies. In: Auerbach PS, ed. Wilderness Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2011:chap 21.Review Date:8/11/2012Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.last_img read more