Football: Erickson, Marz selected to All-Big Ten offensive teams

first_imgIt was a suitable ending for one of University of Wisconsin’s most productive wide receivers to ever play in Camp Randall stadium, as fifth-year senior Alex Erickson was officially selected to the first-team All-Big Ten offensive team by the media and the second-team by the conference’s coaches Tuesday.Erickson recorded 72 catches — 38 more than the next highest UW player and second-most in the Big Ten — for a team-high 924 yards and three touchdowns this season. His efforts gave life to a sometimes struggling Wisconsin passing attack. Erickson will need just six more catches in his final game to match the school’s single-season reception record of 78.For his career, the wideout has totalled 136 catches, 1,823 yards and six touchdowns while serving as the clear-cut No. 1 wideout for Wisconsin over the course of the past two seasons.In addition to Erickson, fifth-year senior left tackle linemen Tyler Marz was selected to the second-team by the media and third-team by the coaches.For the entire season, Marz served as the cornerstone of an offensive line that has been plagued by youth and injuries, and was honored as an All-Big Ten player for the third consecutive year, as he was an honorable mention in 2013 and 2014. Since the 2013 season, Marz has started 39 consecutive games as a left tackle for UW.Both players began their careers as walk-ons, and they will now have one last opportunity in the team’s bowl game to prove their worth in what has been an otherwise disappointing season for Wisconsin.Football: Senior linebacker Joe Schobert wins Big Ten’s top linebacker awardThe Wisconsin football team’s defense ranked among the best in the nation all season, in large part due to the Read…Honorable mentionsSophomore tight end Troy Fumagalli earned honorable mention for his work in place of starting tight end Austin Traylor, who missed five games with a broken right arm.Fumagalli caught 26 balls for 277 yards and a touchdown, proving his potential to be a reliable starting tight end for the team next season.Redshirt freshman offensive lineman Michael Deiter also earned honorable mention from the media, as he started all 12 games on Wisconsin’s line as both a guard and center.last_img read more

ISU expert says stress lingers for dairy producers

first_imgAMES — An Iowa State University Extension dairy specialist says stress continues to be an issue for milk producers trying to deal with low prices.Larry Tranel is also a psychologist. “We’ve seen a lot of cycles in dairy over time — but we really haven’t seen one that had this big a tail on it where it lasted two, three, four years with the low prices,” Tranel says. “We actually take a look at the stress… even though the dairy prices have come back somewhat — we still find that the stress itself is going to have a pretty long tail on it as families try to recover from it.”Doctor Tranel says the extended issues with low prices have taken a toll. “I’m seeing a level of stress that I probably haven’t seen in my 30-year career,” according to Tranel. “When we take a look at the magnitude of the stress — I would say it’s at a very a high level for the most part. Some have weathered the storm quite well — but there’s a lot of people that just really have a hard time.”He says dairy farmers are caught between a rock and hard place. “They can’t afford to get out for the asset values, he says, “but they really can’t afford to stay in either because of some cash flow issues that have lingered on for quite some time,” Tranel says.He says the long-term nature of the dairy industry issues can take a toll. “When people have things we call acute stress — like you have a barn fire or a tragic accident or something just happens real quickly — you don’t have time to prepare for it,” according to Tranel. “But when you have this chronic stress — just day-in day-out for four or five years in a row dealing with that — that’s the kind of stress that eats at peoples nerve endings and gets them more irritable.”Tranel says one of the techniques he recommends for people dealing with these situations is to write things down. He says it allows them to address the issues and move ahead.. As we do farm couple getaways where we bring in these farm couples to try to deal with communication issues, set goals on the farm, trying to transition themselves out of so much stress — the biggest thing they come back with is the fact that you made us write this down is what got us going to the next step. And if you wouldn’t have made us write this down — we’d be talking about this for the next 20 years,” Tranel says.Tranel made his comments at the recent Iowa Farm Bureau annual meeting.last_img read more