Renovation transforms tired Gold Coast home into modern haven

first_imgBefore the Southport property at 88 Musgrave Ave was flipped.FROM a dilapidated 60-year-old house to a mid-century modern marvel, this Southport home has had an incredible transformation. It’s hard to imagine the humble beginnings the property had but glimpses are still found inside, like the original timber floorboards and layout of the second level. A holistic design approach was taken in the five-bedrooms house’s makeover to limit the impact on the environment. It looks like a completely new house now. The owners undertook an extensive rebuild to get it up to scratch.Now standing is a contemporary and stylish abode with pared-back luxury. Owners Alison Wan and Nigel Evans recently completed the rebuild after purchasing the property at 88 Musgrave Ave in 2016. “We did quite an extensive rebuild as such but kept the existing footprint upstairs,” Ms Wan said. “We love mid-century design and architecture and wanted to create a beautiful house with a great entertaining area for family and friends. Something unique and not just a spec house, we wanted a home not a house.” MORE NEWS: House holds record despite selling at a loss More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa10 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day ago MORE NEWS: Looking for a spot to park your boat? Compared to its previous state, which was stuck in the past.Black and timber contrast throughout the home, while polished concrete floors on the ground level are a trendy design element. The backyard, with a pool and pool house with a bar, is another highlight. “Pretty much everything has changed apart from the upstairs footprint,” Ms Wan said. “We tried to use as many sustainable products as possible and tried to salvage what we could of the existing house, like the existing floorboards.“I like the upstairs day-bed area where you can oversee everything with the big beautiful windows that enjoy the outside world.” Every inch of it exudes contemporary design. Or lots of pink? …Ms Wan said the extensive renovation was a labour of love for the pair who are ready to tackle the tools again. “We will be moving on to another project, maybe not as big and grand, something a little easier,” she said. The property is set to head under the hammer on August 24 via Mark Saveall, of McGrath Surfers Paradise. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:54Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter: To sell or to renovate?00:55 Would you prefer bold tones?last_img read more

Seminar class pushes bill in state Senate

first_imgStudents in the freshman seminar “It Ought to be Law” successfully introduced a bill to the California state Senate that would make it mandatory for all public high schools in the state to have automatic external defibrillators available.Senate Bill 63 has been introduced into the California State Senate by Senator Curren Price (D-Los Angeles), who represents the area surrounding USC.The bill also stipulates all school-sponsored athletic events have AEDs available for use, schools have an emergency plan in place and school officials take a certified training course to operate an AED.Professor Nina Rathbun and former State Sen. Kevin Murray teach the class, which has two sessions, with a combined 21 students enrolled.“The entire class is about learning the political system, and in particular, the California state political system, through the practical experience of introducing [a] bill, and lobbying for it, and following it through,” Rathbun said.Students were asked to brainstorm ideas for a bill the first few class sessions. They then chose the issue of AEDs as their focus after hearing about a student-athlete in Texas who experienced sudden cardiac arrest, but whose life was saved because of an AED, according to Rathbun.“I have a friend who suffered from cardiac arrest on a football field in my neighborhood, and almost died from that,” said Emily Welch, a freshman in the class who is majoring in economics and English. “A law was passed very similar to the law that we are trying to pass … We all decided that this was something we wanted to see through in California.”The bill was drafted entirely by students, and students conducted their own research on the subject of cardiac arrest.Murray is USC’s politician-in-residence, and used his experience in the Senate to help students understand the legislative process.“Senator Murray has been a driving force in pushing the students to act professionally and helping them know what the next step is,” Rathbun said.Price introduced the bill to the Senate in early January.The bill was referred to the Education and Health Committees on March 3, and is currently in the Education Committee.The class is planning to fly to Sacramento on March 23 to give testimony to the Senate, according to Rathbun.“It’s quite likely that the bill will get out of committee which is the next step, and I think that it has a fairly good chance of passage,” Rathbun said. “The major issue will not be substantive, but financial.”The bill mandates that costs related to the AEDs will be funded by the state “if the Commission on State Mandates determines that [the] act contains costs mandated by the state.”Students said the chance to work on real legislation has been invaluable.“It was an incredible opportunity,” said Navtaj Singh, a freshman student in the class majoring in political science. “Creating a bill, learning the type of language used to come up with it, [learning] the costs we have to be aware of and learning about the other aspects leading up to the presenting the bill to the Committee and the Senate.”last_img read more