CVPS: More than 50 outages in 2008 blamed on felled trees

first_imgCVPS: Use caution when cutting woodMore than 50 outages in 2008 blamed on felled treesRUTLAND, VT – With fuel prices up, many Vermonters are turning to wood heat, and that’s causing a significant number of power outages due to careless tree cutting near power lines.Central Vermont Public Service, Vermont’s largest power company, today urged Vermonters to use caution when cutting trees anywhere near power lines.”From professional loggers to people cutting wood for the first time, we’re seeing a tremendous number of accidents involving tree-cutting and power lines,” CVPS spokesman Steve Costello said. “We urge all Vermonters to use the utmost in caution to prevent power outages, injuries and even death.”More than 50 power outages have occurred this year due to trees accidentally felled onto CVPS power lines. The outages have affected thousands of customers and cost thousands of dollars to repair. More importantly, Costello said a simple accident can have devastating consequences.”While an outage can be repaired, these accidents can lead to severe injuries that can have lifelong impacts, and fatal accidents affect entire families,” Costello said. “We want to reduce the number of these outages, of course, but we’re even more concerned about preventing injuries or deaths that could be avoided.”In one of the most recent incidents, a homeowner in CVPS’s St. Albans District accidentally dropped a tree onto a power line. “The homeowner and several children ignored the fact that they were in grave danger, and persisted in cutting the tree and being in close proximity to the tree, while it was in direct contact with the utility line,” Costello said.”Only by sheer luck was a tragedy avoided,” Costello said. “The homeowner and the children were in grave danger and didn’t even realize it.”CVPS, which plans a special bill insert on the issue in January, issued a series of tips to keep people safe:* Always look carefully for nearby utility lines before cutting any tree. Sometimes, utility lines can be hidden by trees and other vegetation, such as vines. Call CVPS for assistance before cutting down any tree that is in close proximity to a utility line, or if the tree could fall into a utility line.* Always assume all overhead power lines or damaged lines are energized and potentially dangerous, including the service cables that run from utility poles to buildings.* Never climb, touch or attempt to fell a tree that is in contact with a power line.* If a tree falls into a power line, stop working immediately! Do not attempt to remove the saw or any equipment. Do not attempt to clear the tree or any portion of the tree from the downed line. Do not touch the tree or anything in contact with the tree or overhead cables. Shuffle or hop away from the location; always keep both feet in contact with the ground at the same time. Stay clear and call us immediately at 800-649-2877. Never assume that someone else has made to call. Inform us of the exact location of the event.* Keep others at least 50 feet away from the tree and cables until our crew arrives. This includes pets and livestock.last_img read more

Viewing art with Philostratus Eikones

first_imgAs part of Term 1 of the 2014 Greek History and Culture Seminars hosted by the Greek Orthodox Community of Melbourne and Victoria, the lecture Learning to View Art with Philostratus’ Eikones will be given by Dr Graeme Miles. Dr Graeme Miles is a Lecturer of Classics at the School of Humanities at the University of Tasmania. His research interests include Greek and Latin literature and language; the ancient novel and its ‘fringe’; the works of Flavius Philostratus; history of interpretation and its representation in texts.When: Thursday 10 April at 7.00 pm Where: Ithacan Philanthropic Society building, Level 2, 329 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne For more information, visit www.greekcommunity.com.au or contact (03) 9662 2722 Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more