Quick Tip: Audio Syncing in Premiere Pro CC

first_imgAudio syncing in Premiere Pro CC is an often-overlooked feature, but it can save you a lot of time when editing.Top image from LucasFilmAs professional filmmakers or videographers, we know that our time is money. The more we can streamline our workflow process, the better. One opportunity to do this is during the audio syncing phase. For many years I’ve used PluralEyes, which still works perfectly. Unfortunately, its $200 price tag can be a little much for some content producers. However, there is a solution found directly within Premiere Pro CC and its internal audio-syncing feature.The process of syncing audio in Premiere Pro CC is actually really simple to pull off. It’s also super flexible. In fact, the number of audio clips you can merge into video clips is quite impressive. Here’s the official count from Adobe:You may merge one or multiple audio clips to a single video or AV clip. The total number of audio tracks permissable in a merged clip is 16, including any combination of mono, stereo or surround 5.1 clips.Syncing Multicam FootageWe’re going to show you two ways of syncing your audio. First up is Dave Dugdale. Mr. Dugdale shows us how to take a multicam setup and sync that with higher-end audio. Dugdale drags and drops all of the needed footage and audio into the timeline and then highlights all of the tracks. Once this is done, he right clicks and selects synchronize.Video from Dave DugdaleSyncing Footage Merge ClipsI use RED cameras in my production workflow, which don’t natively capture audio with a built-in mic like DSLRs do. What I like to do is attach a small mic to the RED in order to pick up scratch-track audio, and then I get my final audio with a field recorder. In this video from Curtis Judd, we learn how to sync our footage/scratch-track audio with our field audio using the Merge Clips option in Premiere Pro.Again, the process is pretty simple. You just highlight your footage and audio tracks in the bin, then right click and select merge clips. If you’ve gone through and given yourself a night slate, clap or snap somewhere and the video and audio should sync up very quickly.Video from Curtis JuddHave you ever used this feature in your workflow? Are there any other features in Premiere Pro that you would like us to spotlight? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!last_img read more

Why You Hate Your Sales Force Automation (and what to do about it)

first_imgThis post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet.Recently I dropped into a salesperson’s sales force automation to look at a couple of opportunities. What I found was disappointing.The first deal had five stakeholders attached to it. I was inspired. But other than names and contact information, there was nothing useful there. There was a record of the dates and times of meetings and phone conversation, but not a word regarding the content of those calls. The salesperson lost the opportunity the last time they competed for it, and what I found in the sales force automation was less than helpful in understanding what happened or why.The second opportunity was worse. There was only one stakeholder on the deal, and that one was from outside of the company. There wasn’t single note, but there was an attachment. That attachment was the pricing they emailed the prospective client. Uninspiring.You hate your sales force automation because you believe it only serves management and their forecasts, and you’re mostly right. You hate it because you think it is unnecessary data entry work, and you couldn’t be more wrong.How To Use Your Sales Force AutomationIn that first deal, I wanted to know what each of the stakeholders wanted or needed, what were their individual preferences, who was engaged, who had influence, who had authority, at what stage of the buying cycle they were in, what were their challenges, what would motivate them to buy, what would keep them from supporting us, the questions they asked in meetings, and any email correspondence (which could have easily been forwarded to the software).I would want to know who won the deal last time, why they won, and any communication that occurred with the company between the date the salesperson lost the deal and the day I popped in to look at it.Your sales force automation is a record of your relationships. As you sell, you gather tons of information, information that may later prove useful, information that may later help you appear as if you have command of the details, information that gives you context for future discussions.Don’t be lazy. Don’t be short-sighted. Use your sales force automation to help you sell better. You’ll soon discover that management buys it for the forecasts, you use it to help you manage your relationships and win deals.QuestionsDo you use your system like it belongs to you or your management?Who made the decision to use it that way? Is it serving you?What records would keep? Where should you keep them?No matter how good you believe your memory is, it’s not better than a computer.last_img read more

Pilots shut off wrong engine after bird hit: DGCA report

first_imgThe final investigation report of the Directorate General of Civil Aviation on a bird hit suffered by a Delhi-Mumbai GoAir flight on June 21, 2017, has revealed that the pilots turned off the wrong engine and flew the plane on the engine that had ingested the bird. The report, made public on Tuesday, stated that after about three minutes the crew realised the mistake and tried to restart the other engine mid-air. They then declared an emergency and returned to Delhi, managing to land on a single engine on the second attempt. There were 156 passengers on board at the time of the incident. “The incident was caused by incorrect identification of engine affected with high vibration followed by non-adherence to recommended procedures, lack of situational awareness, poor Cockpit Resource Management and poor handling of aircraft during emergency subsequent to bird strike,” the report prepared by the office of Director of Air Safety (Western Region) said. Mid-air scareAccording to the findings, during take-off roll at around 115 knots, the aircraft — an A320 — encountered a bird strike on engine number 2. “Both crew noticed abnormal sound and vibrations but the pilot in command decided to continue the take-off probably wanting to investigate the problem after getting airborne. After the take-off, the situation was incorrectly assessed and engine number 1 (unaffected engine) was shut down. The aircraft was climbing with the single engine — engine 2 (affected engine), for over three minutes,” the report said. It pinned the blame of the “incorrect assessment” on the First Officer. As the aircraft stopped climbing at around 3,330 feet altitude, the crew realised their mistake and attempted to start engine number 1 but encountered start valve fault. The investigation also revealed that another pilot flying as Staff On Duty entered the cockpit after pressing the cockpit buzzer several times. The pilot in command submitted that he allowed the SOD inside the cockpit because the buzzer was distracting. “The SOD was heard asking information on the problem to cockpit crew while they were performing their duties in-flight and after landing as well,” the report said. As per the pilot in command, there was no information by Air Traffic Control about bird activity but the Air Traffic Information Services reported bird activity in its broadcast. The report also mentioned that after the incident, while taxiing to the allocated stand for parking, the crew took a wrong turn and parked the aircraft in an incorrect orientation.last_img read more