Modi remembers Chhattisgarh’s Kunwar Bai on Women’s Day

first_imgPrime Minister Narendra Modi said several women had left an “indelible mark in the history of mankind” through their “exemplary deeds” and paid tribute to the late Kunwar Bai, the mascot of his flagship Clean India mission.In his Twitter posts, the prime minister also urged people to write about women who had inspired them and use the hash tag ‘#SheInspiresMe’.Through their exemplary deeds, several women have left an indelible mark in the history of humankind. They continue to inspire generations. I urge you to write about some women who inspire you. #SheInspiresMe, Modi tweeted on International Women’s Day. Lauding Kunwar Bai, who passed away at the age of 106 earlier this year, the prime minister said she sold her goats, reportedly her only asset, to build two toilets at her home in Chhattisgarh’s Kotabharri village. Her contribution towards Swachh Bharat (Clean India) cannot be forgotten , he said I will always cherish the time when I had the opportunity to seek Kunwar Bai’s blessings during one of my visits to Chhattisgarh. Kunwar Bai lives on in the hearts and minds of all those who are passionate towards fulfilling Bapu’s dream of a clean India. #SheInspiresMe, he added. The prime minister also shared photographs and a video clip of him felicitating Kunwar Bai during a programme in the state two years ago.last_img read more

Canadians sure love their bacon 8 per cent love it more than

first_imgVANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) — You might be forgiven if you’ve confused today’s National Bacon Day with International Bacon Day, that took place in August, but the pork industry is hoping you won’t mind the redundancy.Quebec pork producer duBreton even released a survey conducted among bacon-loving Canadians which highlights the irrational obsession some people have for the cured delicacy.They say 98 per cent of those surveyed identify bacon among their favourite foods and eight per cent confess to liking bacon more than their spouse. In Ontario, that number jumps to a greasy 47 per cent.Take those claims with a grain of salt, warns Dalhousie University food researcher Sylvain Charlebois.“Most of the time these campaigns are used to promote a product that may need some attention and bacon is certainly one of them,” he says.Charlebois thinks many people have abandoned bacon because of the health risks associated with high sodium and fat as well as a dire warning from the World Health Organization which says eating processed meats is as dangerous as smoking.Cutting back may be good for our arteries, but there could be some fallout for the economy. Canadian producers grow between 15 to 17 million hogs each year, many of them destined for export says Charlebois.“Whatever happens to bacon means a lot to a very significant economic sector of ours,” he says.The bigger picture though is the impact pork products, especially bacon, has on the environment.It takes a lot of water, food and energy to grow a pig and the smoking process involved with creating your favourite breakfast companion means there’s an extra layer to the impact bacon has on the planet.“For someone who’s looking at making choices around food that could reduce the carbon footprint of the food you eat, bacon probably wouldn’t be a good choice,” says Charlebois.last_img read more