From a destructive opposition to a failed Government

first_imgDear Editor,The fourth National Budget for the APNU/AFC coalition Government was presented to the National Assembly despite the majority of the Guyanese population, through the Opposition Leader has declared no-confidence against the APNU/AFC administration for the mismanagement of affairs in GuyanaSince the 2011-2015 period when the APNU and the AFC were the combined opposition with a dangerous weapon of a parliamentary majority, they have used it deliberately and conveniently to take Guyana down the path of destruction. The combined opposition, during that period, who promised a good life and a better future, deliberately, by their vindictive actions destroyed the very foundation upon which they are presently collapsing now.How can people sleep at night knowing that they are guilty of not fulfilling the role the electorate gave them? During the 2011-2015 period the lack of support for major national development projects such as the Amailia Falls Hydroelectric plant, the CJIA expansion, Marriott hotel, a Specialty Hospital, the blocked security measures that would have prevented money laundering and many other measures that are contributing towards a failed APNU/AFC government.During this period the APNU/AFC/PNC was determined not to support any projects that would further enhance the popularity of the PPP/C, regardless of how much the entire nation stands to benefit.Unfortunately, the APNU/AFC coalition government can’t recover from their present collapse, despite presenting four consecutive budgets. We can conclude: From a destructive opposition to a failed Government.Your sincerely,Zamal Hussainlast_img read more

Questions abound as Boks lose in Perth

first_imgAttacking approachIn Perth, the Boks’ only try began with a high-up-and-under, which was won by Kirchner, thanks really to the bounce of the ball. Springbok fans want to see more than that. Ball winnerAlso, with Bismarck du Plessis sidelined after being injured against Argentina in Cape Town, the Springboks lost a valuable ball winner in the loose, and the decision to go for a very big loose trio in Perth, without including a true ball winner, proved questionable. Australia’s Michael Hooper, the smallest loose forward on the field in Perth, effected four turnovers. It’s not often that a team manages to come back from 10 points down as the Australians did to beat South Africa, so hats off to them, but the fact that they did that is what makes it so disappointing from a South African perspective, along with the manner in which the Boks played the game. Game planBy sticking to a game plan that brought the Bulls three Super Rugby titles, Meyer’s Springboks have found it far harder to break down the opposition at international level. The tactical kicking game that was previously spearheaded by scrumhalf Fourie du Preez now looks old and tired, and it appears that the Bok backline has little to offer in the way of innovation and excitement. Playing within themselvesIt seems, in many ways, that a clash of styles, brought from the various franchises, is limiting the Boks. They’re playing within themselves and the result is that some established international players who shone in the Super Rugby tournament now appear to be mere shadows of themselves. Patrick LambieIf one is to criticise Meyer, Lambie is an ideal example to do so. He stood out at fullback on the biggest stage of all in 2011, the Rugby World Cup. However, he was played at flyhalf early in the year by the Sharks before being moved back to fullback. Meyer, though, has opted for the steady, but unspectacular Bulls’ number 15, Zane Kirchner, ahead of the undoubtedly more talented Lambie. A first defeat for the Springboks under Heynecke Meyer felt inevitable after three iffy performances in succession, but it was nonetheless disappointing as the Boks gave up a halftime lead before going down 26-19 to the Wallabies in a Castle Rugby Championship match in Perth on Saturday. A good all-round gameThe best rugby they have played in recent times came during the 2007 Rugby World Cup; they combined an uncompromising defence with razor-sharp counter-attacking. They did the basics well and the general at number 10 was not a kicking flyhalf, but Butch James, a man with a good all-round game. There must be a lesson to be learnt from that. In Meyer’s six tests in charge of the Springboks, it should be remembered that the South Africa team looked at its best in the first half of the team’s 36-27 victory over England in the second test in Johannesburg in June. In that first half, the basics were performed well. They played well with the ball in hand, aiming to get it wide, and were rewarded. So, the question is: why has the ambition of the Springboks’ play receded so much since then, or appeared to do so? Is it time to recall Heinrich Brussouw? In 2011, before being injured, he was lauded for his influence on the game. Now he is on the outside looking in. This much is true: he looked very good for the Cheetahs in their narrow loss to Western Province on the weekend. Granted, test rugby is a different animal, more tightly contested than any other games, but isn’t that where subtle skills make all the difference? Shouldn’t we believe the Springboks are capable of more than they’re showing? And another question about the Springboks’ loose forwards: was Keegan Daniel let go too soon? Yes, he is smaller than the South African ideal of what a flanker or eighthman should look like, but his skills are unmatched among loose forwards in the country. He is one of the reasons why the Sharks are able to play such a good and effective counter-attacking style of rugby.center_img Lots of questions, I know, but that’s where the Springboks’ performances leave us, the fans, at present – with more questions than answers. While Kirchner has not let the Boks down, his ceiling is much lower than that of Lambie, who came off the bench for the first time in three games on Saturday. To match up to teams like the world champion All Blacks, who are South Africa’s next opponents by the way, the Springboks need their most talented players on the park. It didn’t really work for the Bulls in this year’s Super Rugby competition; they finished sixth on the log and were beaten in their first playoff game. The Stormers topped the log with a defensive-minded approach, but they never once earned a bonus point for scoring four tries in a game and that defensive approach it was found wanting by the Sharks in the playoffs. One of the scapegoats for South Africa’s poor performances has been flyhalf Morne Steyn, especially as his goal kicking has been below his usually immaculate standard. He offers less than Patrick Lambie on the attack, with Lambie good at taking the ball flat, while rising star Johan Goosen is as talented a player as anyone in the game, but he has only recently returned from a long injury layoff. The most inventive and attacking of the South African franchises, the Sharks made it to the final. Their style of play, more integrated than that of the other South African franchises, matched up best to the challenge of Australian and New Zealand opposition when the chips were down. 10 September 2012 A man like Kirchner won’t let the team down, but he is not a potential difference maker and match winner like Lambie is. And that is what is needed against the best opposition. When Goosen is fit, let him loose at flyhalf. Where they stood out most was in their ability to offload in the tackle and keep attacking movements alive. It’s something that has been relatively scarce in the Springboks’ approach. They want to see the ball run, especially as South African conditions are so conducive to it. They want to see the physicality of the players used not only to try and run over the opposition, but also around them, or to slice through them. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Invoke NSA for cow slaughter: U.P. DGP

first_imgUttar Pradesh Director General of Police Sulkhan Singh has asked officials to book those accused of cow slaughter or trafficking in cattle for slaughter under the National Security Act (NSA) and the Gangsters Act.“Cow slaughter and transportation of cattle for slaughter must be strictly prevented,” Mr. Singh told SPs and SSPs.This is not the first time that the State government has promised stringent punishment for cow slaughter.In 2014, the Akhilesh Yadav government gave its approval to slap the Gangsters Act and the Goondas Act on those accused of cow slaughter. The State government had made an amendment to the Acts to include the offence.Soon after taking charge in April, Mr. Singh vowed “strict action” against those involved in “vigilantism” for cow protection and asserted that no citizen had the “right to intervene.”However, his latest note to district police chiefs, comprising over 30 points, including instructions on handling cow slaughter, does not mention vigilante groups or the self-designated ‘gau rakshaks.’‘An intimidation’U.P. vice-president of the All India Jamiatul Quresh, Shakeel Qureshi, says that by issuing such orders, the State police were further intimidating those involved in cattle trade.“Such rules harass those involved in the business,” said Mr. Qureshi.He demanded that if those accused of cow slaughter or trafficking in cattle were to be booked under the NSA and the Gangsters Act, similar action should be taken against vigilante groups.last_img read more

Parents Urged to Protect Girls through HPV Vaccine

first_img The Health Ministry is imploring parents and guardians to protect their daughters against cervical cancer by allowing them to be inoculated with the Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Story Highlights The most common cancers in Jamaica are prostate, lung and colorectal in men; and breast, cervical and colorectal cancers in women. Prostate and breast cancers are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that HPV vaccines be included in national immunization programmes as a core strategy for primary prevention against cervical cancer.WHO states that HPV vaccination for girls ages nine to 14 is the most cost effective public health measure against cervical cancer.Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jamaica and the ninth leading cause of death worldwide.The most common cancers in Jamaica are prostate, lung and colorectal in men; and breast, cervical and colorectal cancers in women. Prostate and breast cancers are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths.center_img The Health Ministry is imploring parents and guardians to protect their daughters against cervical cancer by allowing them to be inoculated with the Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.Come Monday (October 2), the Ministry will begin offering the vaccine to girls in grade seven, free of cost.The initiative falls under a $100 million school-based programme in collaboration with the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information.The move is a proactive measure by the Government to protect girls against cervical cancer, which takes the lives of hundreds of women in the country per year and hundreds of thousands more worldwide.Speaking at a HPV media sensitization forum at the University of the West Indies’ (UWI) Mona Campus on September 29, Health Minister,  Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton said 22,500 girls will be targeted under the initiative, noting that two doses will be given six months apart for full protection.He said the vaccine is not mandatory and assured the public that the programme is not a trial and error process.“It is a tried and proven approach that is intended to make our population healthier as it relates to the risk of cervical cancer. I am confident that we are doing the right thing. I am confident that Jamaica needs this, our young girls, our young women; I am confident that it is the right step towards dealing with the risk that is at hand,” he said.He informed that over 200 million doses of the vaccine has been applied to patients worldwide, adding that more than 70 countries, including more than 20 in Latin America and the Caribbean have already introduced the HPV vaccine.Minister Tufton said the initiative is a proactive move by the Government, pointing out that 392 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in Jamaica each year while 185 women die from the disease annually, primarily between the ages of 40 and 64. He said the vaccine is not mandatory and assured the public that the programme is not a trial and error process.last_img read more