Pomeroon woman stabbed 6 times by reputed husband

first_img…air-dashed to city hospitalA 29-year-old mother of three from Lower Pomeroon River, Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam) had to be air-dashed to the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC) after she was stabbed by her reputed husband.Reports are Trecia Griffith, of Noon Grant, Lower Pomeroon River, was stabbed six times about her body on Monday. She was rushed to the Suddie Public Hospital where her condition was listed as critical. However, on Tuesday, after her condition worsened, Griffith was air-dashed to the city.Doctors rushing Trecia Griffith to the ambulanceAccording to information reaching Guyana Times, the woman and her 28-year-old spouse were imbibing on Monday with friends when an argument erupted. The woman’s reputed husband had accused her of having an extramarital affair with one of his friends. Reports are the woman denied the allegation, but her reputed husband allegedly pulled out a knife and dealt several stabs to her body. She received stab wounds to her abdomen and neck.According to sister of the injured woman, Synetha Hoyte, her sister’s reputed husband was trying to slit her throat when another man intervened, lashing him with a chair.“My sister had several, several stab wounds; we thought she would die. She is talking, but we are very fearful, she has a two-year-old child,” she related.The woman pointed out that her sister had endured the abusive relationship for years.The suspect was taken into Police custody.last_img read more

Joburg-Pretoria by high-speed rail

first_img5 August 2011 Within five hours of its launch, South Africa’s new high-speed rail service between Pretoria and Johannesburg had attracted more than 7 000 commuters. The figure was considered groundbreaking for a public train established to reduce traffic between the province’s two economic hubs. After a few delays, the important city-to-city route was finally opened on 2 August. The first train, which left Hatfield in Pretoria at 5.26am for the Johannesburg suburb of Rosebank, ferried hundreds of commuters to work. According to Gautrain management, the train had accommodated 2 000 passengers by 7.00am, and just two hours later had added another 5 000 to that number. Gauteng Transport and Roads MEC Ismail Vadi was one of the first passengers. “Within 37 minutes from Hatfield we were in Rosebank,” he said, referring to a trip that could take up to two hours or more in peak traffic. Vadi added that he found the much-anticipated ride to be “smooth, fast, comfortable and safe”. At its maximum allowed speed of 160km per hour, it’s the fastest mode of transport in South Africa beside air travel. Commuter Mphengoa Phoko started using the train on its launch day. She used to drive daily from Pretoria to her workplace in Johannesburg, but said she will ride the Gautrain from now on. “It’s convenient and less stressful,” Phoko said, responding to a question from her seat. “After a long day at work I won’t have to concentrate on driving.” The Gautrain route between Sandton and OR Tambo International Airport in Kempton Park, which was launched just before the 2010 Fifa World Cup, has already ferried approximately three-million commuters in little more than a year. The Pretoria-Johannesburg route is expected to surpass that figure before the end of 2011, as it attracts thousands of people who commute to work daily. “Gautrain is the future for public transport in South Africa,” said transport minister S’bu Ndebele, hinting that in future the government may look at introducing such high-speed trains elsewhere. The much shorter route between Rosebank and the Johannesburg CBD is expected to go live later in 2011 after completion of outstanding work, bringing on board thousands of new passengers. Gautrain offers a reliable alternative for motorists who were previously not comfortable with the country’s public transport. “Leave your car at home; you can use it over weekend,” Ndebele said.Years of hard work The Gauteng provincial government, then led by former premier Mbhazima Shilowa, launched plans for a rapid rail system in 2004. “We travelled the length and breadth of the world, looking for technology,” recalled MEC Qedani Mahlangu. She said they inspected train stations in densely populated areas like London and Paris, and also visited countries like Spain and Switzerland to gain insight into rapid rail systems. The Bombela Consortium, which comprises international groups Bombardier and Bouygues Travaux Publics, as well as South African civil contractor Murray & Roberts and the Strategic Partners Group, became a private sector partner to Gauteng’s provincial government in 2005. Gautrain CEO Jack van der Merwe told journalists the government’s resolution to complete the project was commendable. “You can’t tackle a project like this without political support, you’ve got to have it,” he said. Up to 8 000 people worked on Gautrain during its construction phase. Mahlangu said the consortium also recruited South Africans who had left the country.Focus on infrastructure Now that Gautrain construction is almost complete, the government can focus on other public rail projects. It is to spend R30.2-billion (US$4.5-billion) over the next three years to improve services of the Metrorail trains, which transport millions of South Africans staying in townships around Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Western Cape provinces daily. Ndebele said the government’s plan to upgrade metro trains too is so that “you don’t have a Gautrain that’s comfortable and fast, but have a Metrorail that’s pedestrian”. Another critical project is the Moloto Rail Corridor in Mpumalanga province, which would see Metrorail trains transporting thousands of Mpumalanga residents who work in Pretoria. Ndebele’s department is still conducting feasibility studies on the much-needed project, which was first mooted by former president Thabo Mbeki some years ago. The government spends millions of rands each year on subsidies for private company buses for Moloto commuters. “Already we’re paying. We have to ask if that is the most effective way of using taxpayers’ money,” Ndebele said. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Kumba invests in SA child development

first_img27 August 2013 Kumba Iron Ore, a business unit of mining company Anglo American, has invested R32-million in the construction of nine early childhood development centres in South Africa’s Northern Cape province. The early childhood development (ECD) centres were built in partnership with the Northern Cape Education Department in Kagung, Magojaneng, Seoding, Batlharos, Mothibistad, Dithakong, Glen Red, Cassel and Bankhara Bodulong. Speaking at the hand-over of the centres in Seoding last week, Northern Cape MEC for Education Grizelda Cjiekella said the new centres were proof of the effectiveness of tri-sectoral partnerships between the government, private sector and civil society. “The onus is upon us to continue to use these ECD centres to plant the seeds of tomorrow and to take charge of our lives and our province as proud, confident and united stakeholders in the education of our nation,” Cjiekella said. The project includes an ECD learnership programme under which six local women will be trained as educators. “If we want to attract and retain the most skilled employees, and live up to Anglo American’s ambition of being the employer of choice, we need to make our people’s environment as welcoming as possible,” said Kumba Iron Ore chief executive officer, Norman Mbazima. “Importantly, if they have children, it is our duty to ensure that they have the best access to education possible,” Mbazima said. “We strive to transform the communities we partner with. We understand that real transformation begins with education, which is why we support such important educational programmes such as ECD.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

The Cameras and Lenses Behind the Scenes of HBO’s Original Series

first_imgCurious about the cameras used to shoot current hit HBO series? Here are the various camera packages and the series using them.For decades, HBO has set countless standards for the rest of the television world, one being the final look of their Original Series. The cable giant has long relied on film standards to elevate their television productions. Their major blockbuster series, Game of Thrones, is no exception.Take a look at what goes into shooting an HBO show.Game of ThronesGame of Thrones set via HBO / ARRI.The Game of Thrones series has primarily relied on the ARRI ALEXA but will, occasionally, use other cameras for VFX-heavy sequences or specialty setups. Fun fact: the ALEXA used in the first season was actually a prototype, as the camera had not yet been officially released.Game of Thrones Camera Package:ARRI ALEXAARRI ALEXA MiniRED EPIC DRAGON (of course it was a dragon!)LensesCooke S4Angenieux Optimo All images via HBO.Looking for more industry coverage? Check out these articles.SXSW Panel: How to Get People to Care About Your Film7 Master Cinematography Techniques from Iconic DirectorsThe Secrets Behind Apollo 11’s Success Are a Story All Their OwnInsights into the Cinematography of the Award-Winning Doc-Series “Tales By Light”Industry Interview: The Composers Behind American Gods In his interview with Mandy, Veep cinematographer David Miller shared this wonderful tidbit:[It] was interesting because there was no rhyme or reason as to the way Veep was laid out. It was kind of chaotic, there was no staging.On the first day, they rehearsed the material for a long time. They were like, “Great, okay, we’re going to go now. Light it.” I’m like, “Wait a second, we’re not quite done.” So, I said we had to change some of the blocking, to make it work. They were so used to doing whatever they wanted. I said, “Well no, you’ve got to say that line here, don’t make that false move, say the line and then move away, but don’t go to this side, go to the other side of the room,” and all that.Julia was a little bit reticent, at the beginning. She said, “You’re trying to control us.” I said, “Well no, I’m just trying to lay it out photographically, so it can all play in one, big thing.” After about a week, when they started to realize: everything cuts together now — everybody’s looking the right direction — the lighting looks so much better. They were like, “Ok, we get it.”In the end, the funny thing is, after changing most of it, and going through it, I won the Emmy.Miller went on to say more:Even though it’s documentary [style], it doesn’t have to look bad. There’s a way to make it work, and it really comes down to all of the staging. Figuring out the staging so that everything falls into place. It’s pretty simple to do, but you just have to be willing to do it.Take a peek at the set, in this behind-the-scenes video. BarryImage via HBO.Barry Camera Package:ARRI ALEXA MiniOptimo zooms, 15-49, 28-76, and 45-120Leica SummiluxDirector Alec Berg with DP Paula Huidobro. Image via John P. Johnson / HBO.In an interview with IndieWire, DP Paula Huidobro stated the following:We chose ALEXA because of the natural and beautiful skin tone rendition of the camera, and also, because of its exposure latitude. I wanted the light to be as soft as possible and my gaffer, Paul Mclevine, and I decided to go with a more old-school approach, using Fresnels, booklights, and Chinese lanterns, instead of the LED technology, which is now the norm. We liked the warmth of the source and glowy quality it would have on the actors’ faces. We had big sources through the windows, with 20Ks set on motors that were easily adjusted. I like soft sources, but keeping the light shaped in an interesting way. I didn’t ever want to drift into flat, comedic lighting.WestworldImage via John P. Johnson/HBO.“Doesn’t look like anything to me.”Westworld Camera Package:ARRICAM ST and LTARRIFLEX 235 (drone)LensesARRI Master PrimesAngenieux Optimo zooms VeepImage via HBO.As Veep cinematographer David Miller says, “Even though it’s documentary [style], it doesn’t have to look bad.”Veep Camera Package:Arri Alexa PlusLensesCooke S4Angenieux Optimo True DetectiveTrue Detective season three set via HBO.It should be no surprise that, with the wildly different seasons, True Detective has relied on different cameras for each season. Seasons 1 and 3 were captured on Panavision cameras, while Season 2 went with an ARRI.True Detective Camera Package:Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL2 (Season 1)Panavision PrimoPVintage LensesFilm used: 35 mm (Kodak Vision3 50D 5203, Vision3 500T 5219) InsecureImage via Justina Mintz / HBO.Insecure Camera Package:ARRI ALEXA MiniCooke S5i lensesIn their interview with IndieWire, DP Patrick Cady said the following:The show is very location-based, and the shallow depth of field, on a wider lens, can bring about that moment where you know where the characters are, but they are still lifted off of the background. Their story is in a place, but it connects to all of us, in our worlds, because we are concentrating on the wonderful cast. I think it helps the audience feel connected to the show. The ALEXA has a wonderful sensor. I don’t think I’ve ever been disappointed in it, and it did a great job of handling the color palette of the Kiss ’n Grind party — a key part of the “Hella LA” Episode — as well as, the hard LA sunlight.More reading on the production of Insecure:Keeping ‘Insecure’ lit: HBO cinematographer Ava Berkofsky on properly lighting black faces — MicInsecure DP Ava Berkofsky on Avoiding “Seinfeld Shots,” Faking Coachella and Lighting Mega-Churches — Filmmaker Magazinecenter_img 35 mm film (Kodak 5203 50D, 5207 250D, and 5219 500T)Image via John P. Johnson/HBO.Westworld cinematographer John Grillo revealed the following in his interview with IndieWire:The opportunity to shoot on film doesn’t come often, so when I was hired for Season 2 of Westworld, I was both excited and a bit nervous, as I had not used it in a long while. That nervousness disappeared when I started watching dailies. Not only was the latitude of the film mind-blowing, but the one thing I noticed right away, that I hadn’t seen for the longest time shooting digital, was the exquisite way that film renders skin tones. The color and texture were just right. We shot a lot of day exteriors in harsh sunlight. Film brought another dimension to the landscape, and our characters’ close-ups. You could feel the softness of Dolores’s skin; you could almost touch every line on the Man in Black’s face. With digital, it can be a struggle under those conditions and subject to myriad of interpretations in color correction, but film is unique.Westworld is also believed to be the first production to shoot on 35 mm film with a drone. In an interview with Filmmaker Magazine, DP Darran Tiernan had the following to say:There’s a great company from Australia called XM2 that Paul Cameron and A-cam operator Chris Haarhoff used when they worked together on the last Pirates of the Caribbean film. They said it was amazing, because sometimes on those pirate ships, they couldn’t get a crane where they wanted and the XM2 guys would set up the drone and, basically, do a crane shot with the drone.For our shots, we flew an [Arriflex] 235, which used 200 foot rolls. So, you’ve only got about a minute and 50 seconds worth of runtime per roll, which is a bit nerve-wracking. John Grillo shot Episode 10, and I believe by that time, XM2 had developed a system that allowed them to use the [Arriflex] 435, in the drone. There’s still aerial helicopter stuff, this season, that Jonah and Paul shot in Utah, which is beautiful. But we did drone work, as well, which is cheaper than the cost of having an aerial unit.More reading on Westworld’s production:“There Is a Reverence On Set When the Camera is Spitting Film Through its Gate”: DP Darran Tiernan on Westworld, Season Two —Filmmaker Magazine‘Westworld’ DP Paul Cameron: A Camera Is Just Another Film Stock  — VarietyHBO’s ‘Westworld’: Cinematographer Paul Cameron on Getting ‘Fearless Coverage’ on 35mm Film — No Film SchoolVideo – Westworld: “First ever use of a [35mm] film camera on a drone” — Reddit More reading on True Detective filming:The Lenses Make the Look on True Detective — PanavisonHow we got the shot: Cary Fukunaga on True Detective’s tracking shot — The GuardianHow True Detective’s Cinematographer Got These 9 Shots — VultureGet a glimpse of the Season 3 set from HBO. Panavision Millennium DXL (Season 3)Panavision Primo, Primo Zoom and Ultra Speed Z-Series MKII Lenses In regards to the look of the series, one of the shows first DPs Alik Sakharov revealed the following:The tone of this series had to be a little bit more expansive than most TV shows. We didn’t want it to feel claustrophobic. We were, basically, trying to explore as many filmic possibilities as we could, and structure shots to create the depth and breadth of a feature film. I, also, explored the idea of under-lighting certain scenes, which allowed us to concentrate the eye on where the action is happening, as opposed to lighting everything in one, big wash of light. I have to say that the ALEXA was instrumental in getting this stuff. I never thought I would be singing praises to HD technology, and yet, there I was — utterly enamored by it.As for the scenes using RED cameras, certain Iceland locations in Season 4 were unsafe for Steadicam operators. Cinematographer Robert McLachlan and crew turned to the carbon fiber 6K RED EPIC DRAGON, since the camera was light enough to be used with Freefly MoVI M10 rigs.More great reads on Game of Thrones production:Game of Thrones’ cinematographer breaks down the ‘dragon-induced Armageddon’ in The Spoils of War — The VergeALEXA wins the “Game of Thrones” — ARRIDRAGONs on the set of Game of Thrones — RED Director Alex Graves Talks Shooting the “Purple Wedding” — ColliderFor additional camera work, check out this behind-the-scenes look at Season 6. ARRI ALEXA XT Plus (Season 2)Panavision B-, C-, E-, G-Series and ATZ Lenseslast_img read more