Drew Remenda on the Sharks: “More from more” is needed

first_imgAfter a well-played but otherwise unremarkable Game 4, Sharks head coach Peter DeBoer was asked how he felt about the series.DeBoer chuckled, amused at the question.“Youʼre in the Western Conference final, you know 2-2, against a really good team.I feel pretty good. We have home-ice advantage. Yeah…, I feel good,” DeBoer said.Knowing his team would be disappointed after the Blues tied the series, the coach once again sent the right message. DeBoer essentially was telling his team: feel good, …last_img read more

Learn How to Operate Your Body

first_img(Visited 25 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 You have built-in machinery and software that’s beyond your awareness. Here are ways to enlist your equipment for better health.Navigation:  How do you know where you are? Some German scientists went looking in the brain for the equipment that keeps you from getting lost. A press release from Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum (RUB). Here’s their tip of the day after researching with ten epileptics given a navigational task: focus, and don’t let irrelevant details distract you.“Distributed and local activity patterns appear to be related: the brain regions that contributed to distributed spatial representations also contained fairly precise information on a local scale,” explains Nikolai Axmacher. “The accuracy of spatial representations was rather variable; interestingly, more reliable representations occurred if the brain’s overall activity in a rapid frequency range was comparatively low.” These results suggest that spatial navigation is particularly successful if other, irrelevant activities can be suppressed.“Fight cancer from the inside:  This tip will have to wait for years of clinical trials, but it appears you have a potent anti-cancer agent inside you. A press release from Concordia University starts with this teaser:Where can you find the next important weapon in the fight against cancer? Just do a little navel-gazing. New research from Concordia confirms that a tool for keeping the most common forms of cancer at bay could be in your gut.The molecule with “massive potential” is called lithocholic acid. It’s a bile acid produced in the liver. In tests of cancer cells in a petri dish, lithocholic acid showed the most potential to kill cancer cells of thousands of body chemicals they tested. “When entering a cancer cell, the acid goes to ‘energy factories’ called mitochondria and then sends molecular signals that lead to the cells’ demise.” Here’s another benefit the molecule may have for all of us: it appears to slow down aging, too.Save your hearing: We all know we should avoid loud noises, but perhaps you didn’t know your body is trying to help you. A press release from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine explains:Our hearing has a secret bodyguard: a newly discovered connection from the cochlea to the brain that warns of intense incoming noise that causes tissue damage and hearing loss, according to new research by Northwestern Medicine scientists.Scientists believe they have identified the ear’s own novel pain system that protects it from very loud or damaging noise. It may be the reason you jam your fingers in your ears when a fire engine or ambulance wails close by. The nerves that normally alert you to pain – like touching a hot burner on a stove – are not present in your inner ear. So, it needs its own private alert system.Those who suffer from hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ears) may benefit from this discovery. For now, stay away from excessive noise when you feel that pain signal.Breathe deep for your brain:  Nature posted a short item that will make you gasp—with a smile. When you breathe in deeply, it boosts the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in your brain. “Cerebrospinal fluid cushions the brain, flushes out waste and in rodents seems to be controlled by pulsating blood flow,” the article says. So before starting a mentally-intensive task, try taking three deep breaths and letting the air out slowly.Taste your health: Quick! Name the four tastes. Sweet, salt, sour, bitter, right? Wait: you forgot umami, the fifth one. MSG is a food additive that activates this taste. Did you know that the umami taste may benefit health? Medical Xpress says so. “Despite the widely held belief that monosodium glutamate (MSG) is an unhealthy addition to food, researchers from Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan, show that the taste it triggers, umami, is important for health, especially in elderly people.” A taste test with 44 elderly participants showed that loss of this sense was associated with poor health ( including low appetite and weight loss).  Did you know that your gut also has umami taste sensors? This suggests that “the umami taste sensation functions in nutrient sensation and modulating digestion in the gut, which could be important for maintaining a healthy daily life.”Reset your travel clock: The body’s circadian clock has a reset button, claims a press release from Vanderbilt University. Experiments on mice, either stimulating or suppressing the neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, showed promise for adjusting their daily cycles. It’s not ready for human testing, but offers hope to “lead to new treatments for conditions like seasonal affective disorder, reduce the adverse health effects of working the night shift and possibly even treat jet lag.”Unclog your arteries: The right diet can assist a ‘cleaner’ protein that is trying to protect you from blood clotting and atherosclerosis, a major cause of heart attack.  Medical Xpress tells how A1M (alpha-1 microglobulin) patrols your vessels, working to “clear out oxidised heme and other harmful molecules,” converting them into harmless substances.“You could say that the tissue is rinsed by A1M in a 5-10 minute cycle, with the protein absorbing the free radicals and heme-groups. A1M acts like a bin that captures and neutralises toxic substances throughout the body – in and around all cells – that would otherwise cause inflammation and damage to surrounding tissue”, said Professor Åkerström.A1M appears to also “clean and reduce oxidised blood fats from LDL,” a primary risk factor for atherosclerosis. Some day, there may be A1M supplements; for now, help your cleaning crew by sticking to healthy dietary guidelines so that the cleaners are not overwhelmed.Fast! put out the flames: Maybe there’s something to all those Biblical admonitions about fasting. Beyond meditation and supplication, fasting appears to reduce inflammation, too. A Yale press release says the anti-inflammatory mechanism of dieting and fasting has been “revealed”.Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.In their study, published in the Feb. 16 online issue of Nature Medicine, the researchers described how the compound β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) directly inhibits NLRP3, which is part of a complex set of proteins called the inflammasome. The inflammasome drives the inflammatory response in several disorders including autoimmune diseases, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, and autoinflammatory disorders.Experiments on diet-regulated mice showed that BHB was able to tame the flames of the inflammasome; it probably would work for humans too. In addition to fasting, low-carb dieting and high-intensity exercise appear to have the anti-inflammatory response. The press release didn’t offer any guidelines for fasting, but it might be worth a try for better health, not that meditation and prayer are any less beneficial. New Scientist says it’s not necessary to starve to get the benefits of fasting.Stay in circulation: Walking keeps the circulatory system in good operation, but what about whose who are bedridden? They are in danger of ailments such as deep vein thrombosis, a life-threatening condition that allows clots to form. To help immobilized patients, researchers at the National University of Singapore have developed bio-inspired socks that wave like the tentacles of corals. This is better than anti-coagulant drugs, because it stimulates the body’s own protective mechanisms. “Equipped with soft actuators that mimic the tentacle movements of corals, the robotic sock emulates natural lower leg muscle contractions in the wearer’s leg, thereby promoting blood circulation throughout the wearer’s body,” the press release says. “In addition, the novel device can potentially optimise therapy sessions and enable the patient’s lower leg movements to be monitored to improve therapy outcomes.” That will be nice to know if it happens to you, but until then—if you are on your feet—give your legs a lot to do.We hope you enjoy these news clips. They are but a few samples that showcase the wonders inside your body. The Creator thought of everything. How many of these and a thousand other systems could have developed through aimless processes of chance? No; we have been blessed with dwellings for our souls that surpass the most magnificent palaces one could dream of owning. Our body palaces come equipped with billions of willing servants who know just what to do—within limits. Be a good king or queen. Treat your servants with respect and care, and they will care for you. Even in this world under the curse of sin, we have much to appreciate, enjoy, and be grateful for. And for those who love the Lord Jesus Christ, a better body awaits after this one wears out.last_img read more

In Maine, A Battle Royal Over Energy Policy

first_imgNet metering is a “regressive tax”Echoing arguments made by any number of electric utilities, the governor’s energy office called current net-metering rules “regressive” and said they amount to unfair subsidies for those who can afford to install photovoltaic (PV) systems.“It’s a regressive tax that’s disproportionately placed on low-income Mainers, and we have a lot of low-income Mainers,” said Lisa Smith, senior planner in the energy office. “In Maine, someone who has a solar panel who applies for net metering not only gets credited the full retail value of the electricity, they’re not paying their fair share of grid maintenance because they’re not only being credited for the supply, they’re also being credited the [transmission and distribution] portion of the bill.“They’re getting everything for free and someone who doesn’t have a solar panel is paying for that,” she continued. “They’re paying for their own and they’re paying for the folks who have solar panels.”Because there are only a couple of thousand net-metered customers in the state now, she said, the costs are not significant, adding, “It has the potential to become quite significant.”Recently, a study conducted for the Maine Public Utilities Commission concluded the actual value of electricity generated by PV customers is double what net-metering now pays. And the latest news was greeted with “disbelief” by the co-founder of a Maine renewables company.“We are rubbing our eyes in disbelief at the governor’s new energy bills,” Phil Coupe, co-founder of ReVision Energy, told The Portland Press Herald in an article published on May 13.“They will take Maine’s energy policy back to the Stone Age,” Coupe said of the new proposals. In what’s shaping up to be one more clash over state energy policy, Maine Governor Paul LePage has proposed the elimination of both net metering and Maine’s renewable portfolio standard. Both policies are regarded as essential by renewable energy advocates but too expensive by the executive branch.Legislators already are doing battle with the Republican governor over how to fix a typo in a 2013 law that now threatens to gut the Efficiency Maine program. The new proposals, yet to be scheduled for a public hearing, will add fuel to the fire.Under current rules, Maine residents with small solar or wind systems are paid the full retail rate for excess electricity they sell to the grid. That would end, as would requirements that Maine electric utilities purchase an increasing amount of their electricity from renewable sources.In both cases, the governor’s energy office says changes are intended to simplify existing law and make electricity more affordable for both residential and industrial customers.Renewable energy advocates are outraged. Lower regulatory barriers for nuclear plantsAlso on the energy front: The governor recently submitted legislation that would eliminate the requirement for voter approval for any nuclear plant with a generating capacity of less than 500 megawatts.Maine hasn’t had a nuclear power plant since Maine Yankee in Wiscasset closed in 1996. There are still some 550 tons of spent nuclear fuel from the 900 MW plant stored on site.The new proposal hasn’t had a hearing to date, and Smith said she was unaware of any specific plans for bringing a new reactor into the state.“I’m personally not aware of it,” she said. “A couple of these proposals were put in to just start a discussion and try to eliminate some outdated language. We actually had language in our statute that said nuclear was bad, or something along those lines. So there were a couple of proposals to look into this issue again. I’m not aware of anything on the horizon.”LePage is actively working to increase the availability of natural gas in the state as a way of bringing down energy costs and making the state more attractive to new industry. Lower costs, not the source of the electricity, is key, Smith said.“The governor is completely agnostic as to the source of the energy,” she said. “He just wants the best deal and he does not want the electricity price hikes we’ve seen. We have large industrial customers who won’t come to the state because of the volatile electricity prices.” But it’s a blow to advocatesMaine is the only state in New England without incentives of its own for solar power, and installers and other renewable advocates were dismayed by the latest proposals from the governor.Vaughan Woodruff of Insource Renewables told The Press Herald that the legislative proposals will discourage customers because they will create uncertainty about the future of net metering, a key component in weighing the economics of a purchase.Coupe also pointed to the contribution renewable energy already is making to the state — a $2.6 annual contribution to the state’s economy every year and the creation of 12,000 jobs, according to a study funded by the Maine Technology Institute, the newspaper said.He called LePage’s proposals “mind boggling.”In an email, Coup raised another point: Maine’s economy increasingly relies on tourism, yet the state is the “worst air polluter in the region.”“Maine already has the lowest electricity rates in all of New England, but we also have the highest per capita carbon pollution in the region due to our over-reliance on oil, propane, natural gas, and gasoline,” Coupe wrote. “As our once-vaunted pulp and paper continues to decline due to global market factors and the advent of the digital (not because of energy costs), tourism has gradually become Maine’s strongest economic driver. Our tourism industry is predicated on Maine’s pristine environmental reputation — in reality we are the worst air polluters in the region.”He said ocean acidification and carbon pollution is already taking its toll on Maine’s lobstering and clamming industries as well as the $7 billion tourism industry.“Gov. LePage’s energy proposals will devastate Maine’s renewable energy and clean-tech industries and over the long term will harm our vital marine fisheries and tourism industries,” Coupe added. “It is the height of insanity.”Given that the Legislature will be in session another month, it’s unclear how far these latest initiatives will get this year. But, Smith pointed out, they can always be put back on next year’s session without being formally reintroduced. Portfolio standard is an “artificial subsidy”Maine has a two-tier renewable portfolio standard that separates renewable energy sources into two classes, Smith explained. Class 1 includes energy projects that existed prior to 2005 or 2006, such as combined-heat-and-power plants and waste-to-energy facilities. Class 2 includes solar, wind, small hydro, and biomass.Maine utilities are now required to purchase an increasing amount of the electricity they sell from Class 2 sources, rising to 10% by 2017.“What has actually happened in Maine is that over 50% of our electricity is already generated from renewable sources,” Smith said. “We have one of the cleanest, the second cleanest, [mix] in the nation as far as electricity generation already.”The real driver of renewable investment in the state, she said, is the demand from southern New England, where the prices for renewable energy certificates (or RECs) are higher.“A wind project in Maine,” she said, “they’re selling their RECs in Massachusetts or Connecticut. They’re not even using our market. We have this artificial, so to speak, subsidy that is not achieving the goal of driving renewable energy investment in Maine.”Smith said the renewable portfolio standard costs Maine ratepayers millions of dollars a year.last_img read more

Mortal remains of CRPF men to be flown to their homes today

first_imgThe mortal remains of the CRPF personnel killed in an audacious terror attack in Jammu and Kashmir’s Pulwama, will be sent to their homes across the country this afternoon, officials said on Friday. While a majority of the 37 bodies have been identified, some of them have been mangled beyond recognition. A home ministry official said arrangements have been made to hand over the bodies to the families. Home Minister Rajnath Singh, who is visiting Jammu and Kashmir to take stock of the situation in the wake of the terror attack, Governor Satya Pal Malik, DG of CRPF R R Bhatnagar will pay their last respect to the departed souls in Srinagar before the bodies are flown out of the state. At least 37 CRPF personnel were killed and five injured on Thursday in one of the deadliest terror attacks in Jammu and Kashmir when a Jaish suicide bomber rammed a vehicle carrying over 100 kg of explosives into their bus in Pulwama on Thursday. More than 2,500 Central Reserve Police Force personnel, many of them returning from leave to rejoin duty in the Valley, were travelling in the convoy of 78 vehicles when they were ambushed on the Srinagar-Jammu highway at Latoomode in Awantipora in south Kashmir around 3.15 pm. The Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) terror group has claimed responsibility for the attack that took place about 20 km from Srinagar, officials said.last_img read more