Diakite ready to begin QPR career

first_imgSamba Diakite will join his new QPR team-mates in Portugal on Wednesday.The Rangers squad flew out from Gatwick this morning for a break in the sun designed to recharge their batteries ahead of the all-important run-in to the season.Diakite, 23, has been representing Mali at the Africa Cup of Nations since the club agreed his signing from French side Nancy on an initial loan deal.With the tournament now over, he is ready to head back to Europe to begin his Premier League career.Manager Mark Hughes is hoping the defensive midfielder can help a team whose defeat against fellow strugglers Blackburn on Saturday increased their relegation worries.Related story: Diakite to join QPR squad on overseas trip (9 February)Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Pierre Terblanche puts SA design skills on the map

first_imgPierre Terblanche‘s childhood passion for design and motorbikes has blossomed into a career as a world-leading motorcycle designer.Despite all he has achieved though, Terblanche still yearns to design the bike of his dreams, hoping to work on something with all his creativity and no limitationsHaving designed for the European and US markets, he still fondly remembers his early Port Elizabeth to Cape Town bike runs.Custom motorcycle manufacturer BikeExif.com called him one of the most influential motorcycle designers in the world today. Norton Motorcycles chief executive, Stuart Garner, praised the man’s experience when he was hired to develop the Norton range.And Confederate Motorcycles founder and chief executive, H. Matthew Chambers, referred to him as a rebel “who by nature is dissatisfied with the status quo” and “intimidatingly intelligent, fiercely courageous, and outspoken to a fault”.Pierre Terblanche is clearly a trailblazer in the motorcycle design world and an early passion for bikes and design has fuelled his career.Born in Uitenhage, Eastern Cape, in 1956, Terblanche was exposed to design and building at his father’s woodworking shop at an early age.After matriculating from Hoërskool Brandwag in Uitenhage, he went on to study graphic design at the Eastern Cape Technikon in the mid-1970s and began his career at advertising company Young & Rubicam, in Cape Town.Here he was tasked with marketing Ford Motors, but needing to follow his passion for design, he enrolled in the Masters in Transport Design programme at the Royal College of Art in London. After graduation he joined Volkswagen’s advanced design studio before leaving for a design post at Ducati Rimini in 1989. It was here that Terblanche produced some of his finest work, including the Ducati 749 and 999, the SportClassic, the Hypermotard, and the Cagiva 600 Enduro, otherwise known as the Canyon.Pierre Terblanche had always loved bikes more than cars because the more hands-on approach meant there was more to do for designers. Pictured above is the Ducati MH900e (Image: Pierre Terblanche)About his switch from VW to Ducati, he told Faster and Faster.net that he had always loved bikes more than cars because the more hands-on approach meant there was more to do for designers. In Italy, particularly, designers are usually involved in the layout, packaging and the clay or hard modelling of the bikes.Terblanche worked for two years with Massimo Tamburini on restyling the Paso and the Ducati 888. Tamburini is widely hailed as a world-class designer and was behind the Ducati 916, argued by enthusiasts as the world’s “most beautiful” bike.It was when he moved to Ducati’s design centre in Morazzone, Italy, that Terblanche designed the iconic Ducati Supermono. According to Terblanche’s website the bike “is the inspiration for the powerhouse Superbike winner, the 916”.After Cagiva sold the Ducati brand in 1997, Terblanche was appointed as the company’s director of design. Here he created the Supersport 900 and made the first online motorcycle sale, of the neo-classic MH900 Evoluzione.By 2006, after 15 years with the Italian company, Terblanche left to work as an independent design consultant. He subsequently developed three motorcycles for Moto Guzzi which won the Motorcycle Design Association award for Best Design at the 2009 EICMA show in Milan.When he joined Norton in 2011, Terblanche was tasked with developing a range of bikes that would appeal to the US market and in 2013, American company Confederate Motorcycles hired him as their head of product development.Despite all he has achieved though, Terblanche still yearns to design the bike of his dreams, hoping to work on something with all his creativity and no limitations.Even though Terblanche has been living outside of South Africa for over 25 years, he still finds pleasure in things that are very much South African. In an interview with BikeExif.com, he said enjoys watching the Springboks thrash the British Lions and taking a solo ride from Port Elizabeth to Cape Town – via the backcountry route past Oudtshoorn – on a sunny South African weekday.{loadposition ambas-menu}last_img read more

Ohio’s young hunters harvest nearly 6,000 deer during youth gun season

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio’s young hunters braved less than ideal weather conditions over the weekend and checked 5,930 white-tailed deer during the two-day youth gun season, Nov. 19-20, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR). During last year’s youth gun season, 7,223 white-tailed deer were checked.Youth hunters could pursue deer with a legal shotgun, muzzleloader, handgun or specific straight-walled cartridge rifle and were required to be accompanied by a non-hunting adult during the two-day season. The youth deer-gun season is one of four special youth-only hunting seasons designed to offer a dedicated hunting experience for young hunters. Youth hunting seasons are also available for small game, wild turkey and waterfowl.Ohio offers many more opportunities for hunters of all ages to pursue deer. The deer-gun season is Monday, Nov. 28, through Sunday, Dec. 4, and Dec. 17-18. Deer-muzzleloader season is Saturday, Jan. 7, through Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. Deer-archery season is open now through Sunday, Feb. 5, 2017. Find complete details in the 2016-2017 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations at wildohio.gov.Youth hunters can commemorate their hunt with a First Harvest certificate, available at wildohio.gov. Participants can upload a photo and type in their information to personalize the certificate. Hunters can also share photos by clicking on the Photo Gallery tab online.For summaries of past deer seasons, visit wildohio.gov/deerharvest.last_img read more

Amputation- traumatic

first_imgDefinitionTraumatic amputation is the loss of a body part — usually a finger, toe, arm, or leg — that occurs as the result of an accident or injury.Alternative NamesLoss of a body partConsiderationsIf an accident or trauma results in complete amputation (the body part is totally severed), the part sometimes can be reattached, especially when proper care is taken of the severed part and stump.In a partial amputation, some soft-tissue connection remains. Depending on the severity of the injury, the partially severed extremity may or may not be able to be reattached.There are various complications associated with amputation of a body part. The most important of these are bleeding, shock, and infection. See also: WoundsThe long-term outcome for amputees has improved due to better understanding of the management of traumatic amputation, early emergency and critical care management, new surgical techniques, early rehabilitation, and new prosthetic designs. New limb replantation techniques have been moderately successful, but incomplete nerve regeneration remains a major limiting factor.Often, the patient will have a better outcome from having a well-fitting, functional prosthesis than a nonfunctional replanted limb.CausesTraumatic amputations usually result directly from factory, farm, or power tool accidents or from motor vehicle accidents. Natural disasters, war, and terrorist attacks can also cause traumatic amputations.SymptomsA body part that has been completely or partially cut offBleeding (may be minimal or severe, depending on the location and nature of the injury)Pain (the degree of pain is not always related to the severity of the injury or the amount of bleeding)Crushed body tissue (badly mangled, but still partially attached by muscle, bone, tendon, or skin)First AidadvertisementCheck the persons airway (open if necessary); check breathing and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing, CPR, or bleeding control.Try to calm and reassure the person as much as possible. Amputation is painful and extremely frightening.Control bleeding by applying direct pressure to the wound. Raise the injured area. If the bleeding continues, recheck the source of the bleeding and reapply direct pressure, with help from someone who is not tired. If the person has life-threatening bleeding, a tight bandage or tourniquet will be easier to use than direct pressure on the wound. However, using a tight bandage for a long time may do more harm than good.Save any severed body parts and make sure theystay with the patient. Removeany dirty material that can contaminate the wound, if possible.Gently rinse the body part if the cut end is dirty.Wrap the severed part in a clean, damp cloth, place it in a sealed plastic bag and place the bag in ice cold water.Do NOT directly put the body part in water without using a plastic bag.DoNOT put the severed part directly on ice. Do NOT use dry ice as this will cause frostbite and injury to the part.If cold water is not available, keep the part away from heat as much as possible. Save it for the medical team, or take it to the hospital. Cooling the severed part will keep it useable for about 18 hours. Without cooling, it will only remain useable for about 4 to 6 hours.Keep the patient warm.Take steps to prevent shock. Lay the person flat, raise the feet about 12 inches, and cover the person with a coat or blanket. Do NOT place the person in this position if a head, neck, back, or leg injury is suspected or if it makes the victim uncomfortable.Once the bleeding is under control, check the person for other signs of injury that require emergency treatment. Treat fractures, additional cuts, and other injuries appropriately.Stay with the person until medical help arrives.Do NotDo NOT forget that saving the persons life is more important than saving a body part.Do NOT overlook other, less obvious, injuries.Do NOT attempt to push any part back into place.Do NOT decide that a body part is too small to save.Do NOT place a tourniquet, unless the bleeding is life threatening, as the entire limb may be harmed.Do NOT raise false hopes of reattachment.Call immediately for emergency medical assistance ifIf someone severs a limb, finger, toe, or other body part, you should call immediately for emergency medical help.PreventionUse safety equipment when using factory, farm, or power tools. Wear seat belts when driving a motor vehicle. Always use good judgment and observe appropriate safety precautions.ReferencesHalluska-Handy M. Management of amputations. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:chap 47.advertisementLyn ET, Mailhot T. Hand. In: Marx JA, ed. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2009:chap 47.Gross KR, Collier BR, Riordan WP Jr, Morris JA Jr. Wilderness trauma and surgical emergencies. In: Auerbach PS, ed. Wilderness Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2011:chap 21.Review Date:8/11/2012Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.last_img read more