Punjab sees increase in farm fires this month

first_imgFarmers continue to burn stubble despite banVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:1501:15  There has been a spike in agricultural fires — a phenomenon that’s known to worsen air pollution — in Punjab in September, significantly more than in the same month last year.Krunesh Garg, member-secretary, Punjab Pollution Control Board, said there were 107 fires from September 24-26. In 2018 there were only 11 fires during the same period. However, in 2016 and 2017 there were 106 and 150 fires respectively from September 27-30.Mr. Garg said last year’s numbers were unusually low because paddy harvesting was delayed due to the persistence of the monsoon. “Last year, the onset of monsoon was late and it persisted well into October. This year, harvesting of basmati varieties of rice has already begun, hence the apparent rise in September,” he said.Agricultural fires, in which farmers set fire to their fields after harvesting paddy, tend to begin around late September and peak around the last week of October by which time farmers have harvested most of their paddy. There were 80,879 fire incidents detected during the paddy harvesting season in 2016, 43,660 in 2017 and about 40,000 in 2018. “There was a 10% reduction last year from 2017 and we expect around the same reduction this year,” Mr. Garg said. Watch | Farmers continue to burn stubble despite bancenter_img Punjab’s fires tend to worsen Delhi’s pollution as particulate matter floats into the city, affecting the already polluted winter air.The Centre and Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh had — over several meetings last year — declared a “zero tolerance” policy on stubble burning by farmers which, according to various studies, contributes anywhere from 17% to 78% to the particulate matter emission load in Delhi during winter.Last year, the Union Agriculture Ministry earmarked ₹591 crore for disbursal to Punjab, Haryana and U.P. to help farmers access machines that collect or plough the stubble back into the soil.A senior official in the Union Agriculture Ministry said in spite of subsidies, the implements were “expensive” for the farmers and thus it was cheaper for them to set chaff ablaze.(With inputs fromPriscilla Jebaraj)last_img read more

Mexico still can learn from WCQ v. Costa Rica

first_imgMexico Qualified Mexico still can learn plenty from remaining World Cup qualifiers Jon Arnold Click here to see more stories from this author @ArnoldcommaJon 00:30 9/6/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Jesus Corona Tecatito Mexico Pedro Pardo Mexico WC Qualification CONCACAF Costa Rica v Mexico Costa Rica World Cup Despite clinching passage to Russia, El Tri will still be able to use the three matches left to sand down the rough edges showed this summer Upon returning from his post-Gold Cup break, Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio looked refreshed.In offering an explanation for his good mood, Osorio reminded reporters that he’d been able to help with his children’s training sessions. He’d enjoyed the experience and said he’d be able to take some of the concepts he was learning with them to his work at the highest level. That his oldest son is 16 should illustrate just how seriously the coach believes ideas can be transferred between levels of the game and also from one region to another.So when Mexico faces Costa Rica on Tuesday, don’t look for a team devoid of passion. The coach will make some of his famous changes (he doesn’t like them being called rotations any more), but they won’t be for the sake of living up to his reputation or for wild experimentation. As Osorio returns to the bench after serving a six-game suspension, he’ll be eager to see how players respond to challenges against the kind of teams they’ll be facing in Russia. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina The Ticos are one of those teams. While closing out qualification against Trinidad and Tobago and Honduras, currently the bottom two teams in the Hex, may not try El Tri, Costa Rica certainly will. Osorio hopes that no matter if he selects a team full of veterans or goes with youth and fresh faces, or some blend, that his players will continue learning no matter the result.”Football as I play it never will stop being unpredictable, having this randomness that can surprise you at any moment,” Osorio said in a news conference Monday. “Our idea is very brave, always going out on the front foot to look for every game. Obviously this implies that there’s plenty to improve. We’re going to have very good games, other times not as much and we’re going to learn and keep improving.”Juan Carlos Osorio MexicoJuan Carlos Osorio Chicharito MexicoMexico needs to improve. That was obvious this summer when the team was outclassed by an alternative Germany side that went on to win the Confederations Cup and then when El Tri saw their own alternative side falter in the semifinals of the Gold Cup. It can only get better by playing together and seeing the individuals that form the team excel on their own. Osorio and his staff can control only one of those things, and the opportunities between now and the enormous test of the 2018 World Cup are surprisingly few. That doesn’t mean tossing the rest of qualification aside. While Mexico’s coaches have been clear that the focus already has shifted toward the summer showpiece and getting Mexico to a fifth game in that tournament for the first time on foreign soil, there are games to be played locally. You have to wonder if privately, despite his convincing statements that the criticism that has followed him at every stage of his Mexico career hasn’t irritated him, Osorio would be thrilled to top the 22 points Ricardo La Volpe achieved in qualifying for the 2006 World Cup. That would give him a number to point to as success for his methods.”The first goal is to finish first in the Hex,” Osorio said. “I think we’re on the way and have every chance. How do we do it? Like I’ve said before, taking every game how it comes. Today the most important is the Costa Rica game, and we’re going to take it on in this way.”The truth is while Mexico has shown its supremacy in the region, knows there’s still plenty to learn. The defense remains a big question, and after Bryan Ruiz and Marco Urena torched the United States, the Tico front men could again find joy against a Mexico defense that, like the U.S., doesn’t have a rock solid center-back partnership. The midfield will be without the injured Hector Herrera, testing depth at a position where Mexico was overrun during the Confederations Cup, especially with Celso Borges a threat getting forward for Costa Rica. And out wide, where El Tri have few resources, Costa Rica fullbacks Cristian Gamboa and Bryan Oviedo will get forward to provide plenty of learning experiences for whoever Osorio puts wide.Tuesday will be a chance to learn. So too, goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa said, will Wednesday and Thursday, the October qualifiers and the friendly games that come.”The team, over the long haul of this process, has gone through a lot of interesting things. We’re very clear on the style of play,” Ochoa said Monday. “I think discussions with the coach and his openness have been very obvious and this has helped us understand the opponent on and off the field.”There are very good things that have been executed and others that, as always, we have to correct, clean up details, try to get better every day. That’s how it’s going to be from here to the World Cup.”last_img read more

Agriculture Minister Commends Winners of PLPU Competition

first_img Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, has lauded winners of this year’s Praedial Larceny Prevention Unit (PLPU) Essay and Poster competition. Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, has lauded winners of this year’s Praedial Larceny Prevention Unit (PLPU) Essay and Poster competition.He was speaking at the competition’s awards ceremony, held today (August 28), at the Ministry, Hope Gardens, in Kingston.“Your bold step to enter this competition shows that you are all motivated to make a change. You are all forward thinkers and you are leaders; therefore, no matter what the decision of the judges, you have all won and Jamaica is all the better for having such bright young minds as you,” the Minister told the students.The competition was held as part of the PLPU’s public education campaign to sensitise Jamaicans about the devastating impact of praedial larceny on the agricultural sector and the livelihood of farmers.The main objective of the competition was to engender greater awareness of the preventative measures that could be implemented by farmers on their farms in order to reduce praedial larceny. It was open to primary and secondary schools across the island.Students at the primary level were required to design a poster depicting the theme ‘Praedial Larceny is Everybody’s Business. What measures should be taken to combat the theft of agricultural produce in Jamaica?’.Meanwhile, students at the secondary level were required to write an essay on the same theme.Eleven-year-old student of Belmont Park Primary in St. Catherine, Sehu Ra, emerged the winner in the poster category. For her effort, she was presented with a trophy, tablet, gift basket, gift bag, a scholarship valued at $10,000, a book voucher valued at 15,000, and a goat.Alaine Preston, Angelique Forrest and Angel Anderson of Ocho Rios Primary School in St. Ann were awarded second, third and consolation places, respectively. They were presented with trophies, gift baskets, bags, book vouchers, farm tools, seedlings, chicks and fruit trees.Meanwhile, Akeila Salmon, a 15-year-old student at Belair High School in Manchester, emerged winner in the essay category. For her winning essay, she received a tablet, a trophy, gift basket, gift bag, a scholarship valued at $20,000, a book voucher valued at $15,000, and a goat.Camara Hamilton, Herbert Morrison High School in St. James, placed second; Shaneka Davidson of Seaforth High School, St. Thomas, third place; and a consolation prize was awarded to Daren Brown of Campion College, in Kingston. They were also presented with trophies, gift baskets, bags, book vouchers, farm tools, seedlings, chicks and fruit trees.National Praedial Larceny Prevention Officer at the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), Sergeant Damian Harry, said he was impressed with the quality of entries submitted in both categories.He lamented, however, that “we have a culture that sees farmers and issues concerning farmers as unimportant”.“One of the ways that we know would bridge this gap is through public education, and where best to start but with our students, our young minds,” he said.Mr. Harry said he is appealing for more organisations to come on board. “We need your support; we need to make people aware; we need to make the competition bigger and better for next year,” he said.Sponsors for this year’s competition were Crime Stop Jamaica, Hi-Pro Ace Supercentre, Jamaica Dairy Development Board, Jamaica Small Ruminants Association, JP Tropical Foods Limited, and Seprod Limited. “Your bold step to enter this competition shows that you are all motivated to make a change. You are all forward thinkers and you are leaders; therefore, no matter what the decision of the judges, you have all won and Jamaica is all the better for having such bright young minds as you,” the Minister told the students. He was speaking at the competition’s awards ceremony, held today (August 28), at the Ministry, Hope Gardens, in Kingston. Story Highlightslast_img read more