Danijela Čavlović, HGK: While they congratulate us in Europe, some in Croatia are worried about the growth of private accommodation

first_imgWe will remember the last year by the best tourist results in recent Croatian history. Double-digit growth in overnight stays and arrivals exceeded even the most optimistic expectations, especially in October and November, where in some destinations it amounted to 30%, and we achieved more than 100 million overnight stays three years earlier than planned by the Croatian Tourism Development Strategy. 2020The strongest growth was achieved in family accommodation, where in the first 11 months 14% more overnight stays and even 20% more arrivals were recorded. Croatia was declared the absolute winner at the awards ceremony for the best European house of the year organized by the European Association of Family Accommodation, which brings together more than 20 million beds, while the Russians chose us as the best destination for family accommodation. “Bravo, you are a great example of the orderliness of this market, and we see that it is getting higherYou are investing in quality, ”they tell us in Europe, where they are still trying to find ways to more effectively regulate this important segment of the collaborative economy.However, it turns out that in Croatia they are not so impressed by the growth of this type of micro-entrepreneurship, which through more than 85.000 registered households directly or indirectly employs 350.000 people and generates income of 2,5 billion euros. We have even witnessed that some are seriously concerned with the explanation. “that Croatia needs more hotel accommodation than family accommodation because it is in line with the above-mentioned Strategy ”. On the other hand, politicians constantly point out that the demographic picture is devastating, and they are worried that people have managed to put their real estate into business and feed themselves and their families by watching their neighbors take their lives to Germany or Ireland. No work. “No, it is not the problem of the family but those who buy apartments in Zagreb, Zadar, Split… and make money on them”, Explains our interlocutor in a high position in the executive branch.So isn’t profit a goal considering the invested capital and operating costs, if the investor has registered the maximum allowed 20 beds per address and OIB by law? He also employs a laundromat, taxi drivers, nearby restaurants, increases the turnover of shops, museums, clubs… If you are worried that they may earn a lot more than 230.000 kuna per year as a lump sum (the threshold for entering the VAT system is from 1.1.2018. raises to 300.000 kuna) why do you not send them to the supervision of inspectors of the Ministry of Finance, ie the Customs Administration, which should determine whether the owner of the accommodation reports all guests and shows the total income?Another problem that has emerged thanks to good tourist figures is the lack of manpower. With 180.000 unemployed, we had to increase quotas for employing foreigners, which is fine because our people are accepted as workers in other countries, but the question is how many of them will want to work for Croatian wages and at the same time smile and patiently answer numerous tourist inquiries? Or maybe we could use the model from the 80s of the last century when Croatia achieved much higher tourist numbers, and workers were recruited from the local population, which especially in the coast has a tradition of tourism for more than a century.Hotel houses paid scholarships for the education of future waiters, chefs, maids, receptionists knowing that these young people grew up in a tourist environment and have a high culture of dealing with guests. Although hotel salaries were not high even then, the difference was compensated by transferring the excess guests to the apartments of their parents, grandparents and other relatives… In this synergy of hotels and family accommodation everything worked – there was no shortage of labor to his country and from his work.Photo: www.kvarnerfamily.hrBut somehow with each new change of structures we forget the models that have proven their effectiveness and bring new ones that too often benefit only a few, which we have especially witnessed in the last few months. At the same time, we are concerned that households make up more than 50 percent of the total tourist capacity, because, as our interlocutor says, this is not the case anywhere in the world.So shouldn’t we finally be pleased and proud to be at least in something of a ‘role model’ in much more successful markets instead of thinking about limiting or even reducing the growth of this micro-entrepreneurship thanks to which still a large part of the population decides to stay in this country full of life?Author: Danijela Čavlović, President of the Croatian Chamber of Commerce Family Tourism AssociationRelated news:CROATIA THE ABSOLUTE WINNER IN CHOOSING THE BEST HOLIDAY HOMES IN EUROPE! FAMILY MICRO ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN TOURISM – A ISSUE OF SURVIVALBE A HOST IN FAMILY ACCOMMODATION, NOT REAL ESTATE AGENTSlast_img read more

Ministry looking for volunteers for wildlife count

first_imgPeace River residents are being encouraged by the Ministry of Natural Resource Operations to participate in the 4th Annual Public Winter Wildlife Count.The Ministry is hoping to persuade hunters, First Nations, agricultural producers, naturalists and families to participate in a one day event to help keep up-to-date and accurate wildlife records for the Peace River area.- Advertisement -The count first began several years ago after the Ministry received complaints from local farmers and ranchers about wildlife communities causing agricultural crop damage, says Conrad Thiessen, a wildlife biologist with the Ministry. Thiessen says the Ministry wanted to change hunting regulations for certain wildlife populations, but first had to collect information on specific species population densities.[asset|aid=3387|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=c17a8265ff15c3fa25059b2ac70d8976-Thiessen wildlife count 1_1_Pub.mp3] The wildlife count will take place on Jan. 15. The count is only being conducted over one day to help avoid double counting.Participants are asked to count mule deer, white-tailed deer, moose, elk, coyotes, wolves, foxes and sharp-tailed grouse. The Ministry is also asking people to write down if any animals appear sick so that those numbers can be recorded.Advertisement Thiessen says there are approximately 400 blocks making up the survey area and each group of people is given one block to survey throughout the day.He says the survey is a great way for residents to get involved in wildlife management and spend time with their families.The Ministry will also be awarding prizes to some residents that come out and participate.Anyone interested in getting involved with the wildlife count can contact the Ministry at 250-787-3411 and ask for Nick, Lori or Conrad.Advertisementlast_img read more

Doubt cast on computer-aided breast cancer detection

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BOSTON (AP) – A good mammogram reader may do just as well at spotting cancers without expensive new computer systems often used for a second opinion, a new study suggests. Computerized mammography, now used for about a third of the nation’s mammograms, too often finds harmless spots that lead to false scares, researchers found. That conflicts with earlier studies showing benefit from the systems. ”It looks like computer-aided detection might not be working like people thought it would,” said lead researcher Dr. Joshua Fenton, a family doctor at the University of California-Davis, in Sacramento. The findings, which appeared Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, touch on a rapidly spreading technology first marketed in 1998. Known as computer-aided detection or CAD, it consists of a computer coupled with software that identifies suspicious spots on mammograms and visibly marks them. Here’s how it works. When mammograms are taken, radiologists first read the X-rays and make their own judgments. But they can then double-check with the computer system to see if they have missed anything that’s worth examining further. There usually isn’t. Still, some studies have shown that CAD can turn up 10 percent to 20 percent more cancers. Patients often have no idea if this new technology is being used. The researchers in this five-year study – backed by the federal government and the American Cancer Society – analyzed mammograms from medical centers in Washington state, Colorado and New Hampshire. Seven of 43 centers used CAD. The mammograms came from 222,135 women and included 2,351 with a cancer diagnosis within a year of their tests. The researchers found that with computerized mammography, a third more women were called back for suspicious findings and 20 percent more got biopsies than with ordinary mammograms. That might be a good thing, if enough cancers turned up to justify the minor surgeries and anxiety surrounding them. Yet the computerized method showed no clear capability to turn up more cancer cases than unaided readings: Four cancers were found for every 1,000 mammograms, whatever screening method was used. That means that CAD would give 156 more unneeded callbacks and 14 more biopsies for every additional cancer it finds. And though these extra cancers tend to be early ones that are easier to treat, many would never be threatening anyway. Dr. Phil Evans, at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, said that ”most radiologists that use computer-aided mammograms understand there are many false positives.” Frustratingly, the study ultimately wasn’t big enough to reach fully reliable comparisons between the rates of cancers found by the two methods. That means that bigger studies are needed to clarify whether computerized mammography finds enough additional cancers to make it worth all those false alarms and added cost. While the technology adds just $20 or so to a single mammogram, a CAD unit might cost $50,000 to $75,000. Even so, Dr. Jay Baker, a Duke University radiologist who has studied the technology, said: ”I don’t think it’s a huge stop sign to using CAD.” ”CAD won’t go away; it will have a place,” agreed Dr. Ferris Hall, a mammogram specialist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in Boston, who wrote an accompanying editorial. But he added, ”This is a setback for it.” Whether computerized or not, periodic mammograms are recommended for healthy women every year or two once they reach age 40. Experts advise women to check the credentials of radiologists at the clinic they plan to use and look for places that do a high volume.last_img read more