Gadkari announces plan for cruises from Mumbai

first_imgUnion Minister for Road Transport, Highways and Shipping Nitin Gadkari on Tuesday unveiled plans for holiday cruises from Mumbai to Bali, Indonesia, via Kochi and Andaman and Nicobar. He also said that norms for sea plane operations would be finalised shortly.The minister, speaking to the press on the side lines of a government function in the city, said that Indian tourists visit Singapore, Bangkok, Bali, and that a lakh of Indian tourists travel to Singapore to take cruise holidays; instead they could take a cruise there. “This will become a big tourism attraction. Our effort is to develop cruise tourism here.”On the seaplane tourism initiative, Mr. Gadkari said, “All rules have been formalised by Air Traffic Control authorities. It will be finalised this month.” He also said that a convention of travel and tourism operators was being organised in Mumbai to discuss development of the holiday cruise industry along the Western coast.last_img read more

Amputation- traumatic

first_imgDefinitionTraumatic amputation is the loss of a body part — usually a finger, toe, arm, or leg — that occurs as the result of an accident or injury.Alternative NamesLoss of a body partConsiderationsIf an accident or trauma results in complete amputation (the body part is totally severed), the part sometimes can be reattached, especially when proper care is taken of the severed part and stump.In a partial amputation, some soft-tissue connection remains. Depending on the severity of the injury, the partially severed extremity may or may not be able to be reattached.There are various complications associated with amputation of a body part. The most important of these are bleeding, shock, and infection. See also: WoundsThe long-term outcome for amputees has improved due to better understanding of the management of traumatic amputation, early emergency and critical care management, new surgical techniques, early rehabilitation, and new prosthetic designs. New limb replantation techniques have been moderately successful, but incomplete nerve regeneration remains a major limiting factor.Often, the patient will have a better outcome from having a well-fitting, functional prosthesis than a nonfunctional replanted limb.CausesTraumatic amputations usually result directly from factory, farm, or power tool accidents or from motor vehicle accidents. Natural disasters, war, and terrorist attacks can also cause traumatic amputations.SymptomsA body part that has been completely or partially cut offBleeding (may be minimal or severe, depending on the location and nature of the injury)Pain (the degree of pain is not always related to the severity of the injury or the amount of bleeding)Crushed body tissue (badly mangled, but still partially attached by muscle, bone, tendon, or skin)First AidadvertisementCheck the persons airway (open if necessary); check breathing and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing, CPR, or bleeding control.Try to calm and reassure the person as much as possible. Amputation is painful and extremely frightening.Control bleeding by applying direct pressure to the wound. Raise the injured area. If the bleeding continues, recheck the source of the bleeding and reapply direct pressure, with help from someone who is not tired. If the person has life-threatening bleeding, a tight bandage or tourniquet will be easier to use than direct pressure on the wound. However, using a tight bandage for a long time may do more harm than good.Save any severed body parts and make sure theystay with the patient. Removeany dirty material that can contaminate the wound, if possible.Gently rinse the body part if the cut end is dirty.Wrap the severed part in a clean, damp cloth, place it in a sealed plastic bag and place the bag in ice cold water.Do NOT directly put the body part in water without using a plastic bag.DoNOT put the severed part directly on ice. Do NOT use dry ice as this will cause frostbite and injury to the part.If cold water is not available, keep the part away from heat as much as possible. Save it for the medical team, or take it to the hospital. Cooling the severed part will keep it useable for about 18 hours. Without cooling, it will only remain useable for about 4 to 6 hours.Keep the patient warm.Take steps to prevent shock. Lay the person flat, raise the feet about 12 inches, and cover the person with a coat or blanket. Do NOT place the person in this position if a head, neck, back, or leg injury is suspected or if it makes the victim uncomfortable.Once the bleeding is under control, check the person for other signs of injury that require emergency treatment. Treat fractures, additional cuts, and other injuries appropriately.Stay with the person until medical help arrives.Do NotDo NOT forget that saving the persons life is more important than saving a body part.Do NOT overlook other, less obvious, injuries.Do NOT attempt to push any part back into place.Do NOT decide that a body part is too small to save.Do NOT place a tourniquet, unless the bleeding is life threatening, as the entire limb may be harmed.Do NOT raise false hopes of reattachment.Call immediately for emergency medical assistance ifIf someone severs a limb, finger, toe, or other body part, you should call immediately for emergency medical help.PreventionUse safety equipment when using factory, farm, or power tools. Wear seat belts when driving a motor vehicle. Always use good judgment and observe appropriate safety precautions.ReferencesHalluska-Handy M. Management of amputations. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:chap 47.advertisementLyn ET, Mailhot T. Hand. In: Marx JA, ed. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2009:chap 47.Gross KR, Collier BR, Riordan WP Jr, Morris JA Jr. Wilderness trauma and surgical emergencies. In: Auerbach PS, ed. Wilderness Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2011:chap 21.Review Date:8/11/2012Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.last_img read more

Beanibazar youths risking life in pursuit of European dream

first_imgRefugees and migrants wait to be rescued by members of the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, after leaving Libya trying to reach European soil aboard an overcrowded rubber boat, north of Libyan coast, on 6 May 2018. AP/UNB File PhotoIn recent times, youths in Sylhet have become desperate to migrate to European countries, without bothering the least about their finances or personal safety. The tendency is particularly acute among the residents of Beanibazar upazila.Recently, four young men of the area went missing while they were crossing the Mediterranean Sea to reach Italy via Libya. There are hundreds of their likes who started their trip to Europe via Libya and Turkey. A good number of them went missing before they reached the destination.Surprisingly, their family members are reluctant to cooperate with the authorities.A 28-year-old man named Tuhin went missing on his way to Europe, said, Abani Shankar Kar, officer-in-charge of Beanibazar Police Station. He contacted with his family members for the last time on 6 May.Another man, Abdul Halim Sujon, 32, went missing the same way. He is the son of late Ahmad Ali of Maijkapon village in Muria union.Sujon was an auto-rickshaw driver. He contracted with a broker named Parvej Ahmed about a year back to get to Italy at a cost of nearly Tk 1 million (he paid Tk 983,000). He had started his journey to Italy soon after and reached Libya, said his elder brother Abdul Alim.After waiting in war-torn Libya for a long time, he along with others boarded a trawler meant for Italy via the Mediterranean Sea on 9 May. From then, Sujon is missing. The broker, who sent him on the trip, confirmed to Sujon’s family that he boarded an Italy-bound trawler.Hearing news of the recent boat containing Bangladeshis capsizing in the Mediterranean, killing dozens of them, Abdul Alim expressed his fear that his brother might have drowned in the sea.Earlier, two other people named Rafik Ahmed and Ripon Ahmed went missing in the same way.Three people of Sylhet went missing in the Mediterranean Sea three years ago. They are Imon, 22, Faridul Alam, 24, and Imran, 30. But no case has been filed yet in this regard. The silences may have something to do with the fact that they embarked on their journey knowing full well that their route fell outside the law.A source requesting to be unnamed said that at least 1,200 people of Sylhet are still waiting in Libya, where Bangladeshis cannot go legally since 2014, for migration to Italy, crossing the Mediterranean. Of them, around 150 people are said to be from Beanibazar, who reached Libya via several countries. Just to reach Libya, each of them had paid TK 6-7 lakhs to the traffickers already.Abani Shankar Kar said those who lured them into such danger for luxurious lives won’t be spared, and law enforcers stand ready to take the necessary action if a case is filed.In the last six months, more than 300 youths left Beanibazar hoping to migrate to Italy, France, Spain, Portugal using Libya and Turkey as transit points. Many of their fates remain unknown.Nahid, one of those who survived the hazardous journey to Italy but is now back in Bangladesh, shared his experience of the voyage through the Mediterranean.”A boat with 80 people, much more than its capacity, is floating on the stormy ocean, rollicking in the waves. Sharks are spotted around the boat. If you fall off the boat, they will pounce. The 80 souls are desperate to reach Europe, beckoning like a paradise where their fates will change. But in that moment, a hellish death is closer to them.”last_img read more

Falsely Accused Black College Students Get Apology

first_imgBy JIM SALTER, Associated PressST. LOUIS (AP) — The city manager and police chief in a suburban St. Louis town apologized Thursday to a group of Black college students after police wrongly accused them of a dine-and-dash and used several squad cars to escort them back to a restaurant.Washington University in St. Louis. (Courtesy Image/Logo)Clayton city manager Craig Owens said he and chief Kevin Murphy met with several of the 10 Washington University students, calling the meeting “emotionally powerful.” Owens said in a statement that he and Murphy left the meeting with a better understanding of “what it is like to be a young African-American who is confronted by the police.” Owens and Murphy are White.The incident involved 10 incoming freshmen on campus for a five-week summer program to help them prepare for university life at the prestigious school that sits that sits at the boundary of St. Louis and Clayton.After a late-night dinner at a Clayton IHOP restaurant the students were walking to a light rail station around 12:30 a.m. July 8 when they were approached by two officers.The restaurant manager had told police that a group of young Black men left without paying a $62 tab. The students had, in fact, eaten at the restaurant and some were carrying to-go bags. But they told police they paid their bills — some showed receipts.Murphy said the students agreed to walk back and talk with the restaurant manager. The university said six squad cars followed the students, though Murphy believed the number was four.Back at the restaurant, the manager told police the students were not those who left without paying.Washington University Chancellor Mark Wrighton met with Clayton leaders on July 12 and again on Tuesday to express their concern and anger, said Jill Friedman, vice chancellor for public affairs.“I have great admiration for our students’ maturity, fortitude and candor,” Wrighton said. “They are truly remarkable. I had hoped that this kind of dialogue with the city would open city leaders’ eyes, open their hearts and open their minds, and it did.”Owens said that in hindsight, police mishandled the incident and lacked sensitivity about the students’ “everyday reality because of how racial bias affects their lives.”The city will expand training programs to help ensure against bias and improve racial sensitivity training, and an outside expert will examine current procedures, Owens said.last_img read more