Man Utd boss Ferguson keen to beat Chelsea to signing of Brazilian – report

first_imgManchester United boss Sir Alex Ferguson is trying to pip Chelsea to the signing of Brazilian teenager Lucas Moura, the Daily Mirror say.Ferguson is reported to have sent a delegation to Brazil to thrash out a deal to sign the Sao Paulo midfielder and is pleading with United’s owners to spend up to £30m on him.Real Madrid are also said to be interested in Moura, who has already played for his country and is regarded as one of the world’s top prospects.The Daily Mail suggest that Benfica’s apparent interest in Manchester United midfielder Anderson could help Chelsea capture Axel Witsel.Mackie recently signed a new deal.It’s believed that Witsel – reportedly a target for Chelsea and Real Madrid – will be allowed to leave if Anderson signs for the Portuguese club.Meanwhile, QPR’s Jamie Mackie is wanted by Southampton and West Ham, according to The Sun.It is claimed that both promoted clubs are considering tabling £1m bids for the Scotland forward.Mackie signed a new contract at the end of last season, committing his future to Rangers until 2015.Fulham are interested in signing Blackburn goalkeeper Paul Robinson, according to the Mail.It is claimed they could move for the former England man after his transfer to Turkish outfit Beskitas appeared to stall.The Sun report that Fulham are competing with Ajax for the signing of FC Twente’s Holland Under-19 midfielder Chris David.The player’s agent Fabio Alho is quoted as saying: “Fulham and Ajax both want to be kept informed about Chris.” Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

SA gives to region’s hungry

first_img5 October 2005The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) have praised South Africa for a R140-million (US$21.5-million) contribution to the agencies’ operations in southern Africa.The WFP will R35-million ($5.4-million) for food aid while the FAO will receive R98-million ($15-million) for agricultural and livestock inputs. An additional R7-million ($1.1-million) will be donated for the SADC Regional Early Warning System.“Yet again the government of South Africa is playing a leading role in trying to help its neighbours during their time of critical food need”, WFP regional director for southern Africa Mike Sackett said in a statement on Tuesday.According to the WFP, the donation comes at a critical time in the gearing up phase of programmes ahead of the region’s lean season, which starts as early as November in some countries.“Already many poor people have very little to eat and their needs are only going to escalate the closer we get to the lean season, but because it’s a cash donation, we’ll be able to buy food locally and quickly transport it to the people in need,” Sackett said.The donation is the third major contribution from South Africa to the UN agencies since 2003, when SA donated R170-million, followed by a R100-million donation in 2004.The situation in southern Africa is considered so serious that in early August, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan wrote to 27 heads of state, the European Commission and the African Development Bank to raise the alarm for urgent funding to “avert a catastrophe”.“Large numbers of people in the central-eastern part of southern Africa – including Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and southern Mozambique – are at risk of food insecurity due to reduced harvests, lack of purchasing power and the devastating effects of HIV/Aids,” said Anne Bauer, director of the FAO’s emergency operations and rehabilitation division.The WFP launched a regional appeal in January this year for US$621-million to assist the region’s most vulnerable in Lesotho, Swaziland, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia and Zimbabwe over the next three years.The organisation says it faces an immediate funding shortfall of US$152-million to feed up to 9.2-million people through to the end of the next lean season in March/April 2006.The FAO, for its part, has asked for $16-million to finance its emergency activities in southern Africa. To date, the agency has only received $3-million.“Maize prices are already rising dramatically in most countries in the region, months ahead of the lean season, which means that many people we assumed would be able to fend for themselves will need food aid earlier,” Sackett said.“The South African donation comes at the right time to help many people who would otherwise face an extremely difficult and long period without enough food to eat.”SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

Field Day with Jordan Hoewischer: The Nature Conservancy

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentOhio Farm Bureau’s Director of Water Quality and Research Jordan Hoewischer talked with Dr. Jessica D’Ambrosio of The Nature Conservancy earlier this summer. On this edition of Field Day, Hoewischer and D’Ambrosio discussed the role of The Nature Conservancy and how the organization works with farmers to help make positive impacts on water quality.Field Day with Jordan Hoewischer is an ongoing series of conversations with experts and leaders who are helping to shape and secure the future of Ohio’s ag industry for generations to come.Following are some highlights from Episode 8.  Complete transcript  Q: Give us an overview of The Nature Conservancy and how farmers and environmentalists can work together.A: The Nature Conservancy is the largest conservation organization in the world. We’ve got offices in all 50 states in the U.S. and in more than 60 countries across the world. It’s our mission to preserve the land and water upon which all life depends. We probably got our start and are probably most famously known for purchasing and protecting rare and unique places all over the world. In this area of the world the, the Western Lake Erie Basin, we learned early on we are trying to protect a endangered mussel species in the St. Joseph River and we realized really early on that we weren’t able to do the work we needed to do to protect that species without involving the landowners, and the landowners in that watershed were predominantly farmers. Once we started talking to them instead of ignoring them or not incorporating them in the solutions, we found that they were many times more interested and more excited about what we were doing, sometimes more than we were.Q: We’ve talked about a combination of voluntary and regulatory nutrient management practices. What’s your opinion on proposed or rumored future legislation on water quality or farming as a whole?A: If you read the mass balance study that was recently done by Ohio EPA, you’ll see that it does state that the voluntary measures that are in place now, and continue to be in place, have done a really good job of – I am going to use an analogy here – stabilizing the patient. So we have a patient, Lake Erie and Lake Erie watershed, who’s sick and those voluntary practices, without those in play, we wouldn’t be able to debate these ideas and these decisions about what we should do next and who we should involve. I think regulatory measures and policies need to be on the table as part of the solutions. Continued voluntary action does too. So, can we take next steps, voluntary or regulatory, that help treat the root causes and then can that lead us towards really getting rid of the disease that Lake Erie has which is these chronic algal blooms.Q: It’s easy to generalize a whole segment of people (farmers) as the main culprit in the water quality issue, but I wish we could focus on solutions and not so much who’s at fault or who’s to blame because the issue is the issue.A: I think that’s where The Nature Conservancy has had a lot of success in working with the ag community as we’ve sat down and we’ve said, ‘Hey let’s talk about how we can work on this together and what are real solutions you can implement as an industry’ rather than saying it your ‘It’s your fault; you better fix it or else.’ So, again catching more flies with honey than with vinegar and real solutions that are practicable and that are cost effective that makes sense.  Leave a Commentlast_img read more

Separatists call for strike to mark Afzal Guru’s sixth death anniversary

first_imgNormal life in Kashmir was affected on Saturday due to a strike called by separatists to mark the sixth death anniversary of Parliament attack convict Mohammad Afzal Guru, who was hanged on this day in 2013.Shops and other business establishments remained closed while public transport was off the roads due to the shutdown called by the separatists, officials said.Separatists Joint Resistance Leadership (JRL), consisting of both factions of Hurriyat Conference and Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), called for a shutdown to press for their demand that Afzal Guru’s mortal remains be returned for burial in Kashmir.Authorities have placed Syed Ali Shah Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and several other separatist leaders under house arrest to prevent them from holding any protest marches, the officials said. Security personnel have been deployed in strength at vulnerable places across the valley for maintaining law and order, they said.Afzal Guru was hanged and buried inside New Delhi’s Tihar jail on February 9, 2013.last_img read more