Mane Double Sends Senegal into Knock out Phase

first_imgSadio Mane scored twice Monday evening as Senegal eased to a Group C victory over Kenya and booked their place in the last 16 of the Africa Cup of Nations.The Liverpool forward had a first-half penalty saved by Kenya keeper Patrick Matasi, before adding to Ismaila Sarr’s volley with a placed effort.Mane then converted a second spot-kick after Philemon Otieno was sent off for a dangerous tackle on Sarr late on. Senegal face Uganda in the last 16 on 5 July.Kenya could still qualify as one of the best four third-placed teams, depending on the results in the final games in Group E and F.However, Monday’s result means DR Congo definitely qualify from Group A with a superior goal difference.Elsewhere, Napoli midfielder Adam Ounas scored twice and picked up an assist on his first appearance at the Africa Cup of Nations as Algeria maintained their 100% record with victory over Tanzania.Ounas set-up Leicester striker Islam Slimani for the opener before netting twice in a dominant first-half display.Algeria, who finish top of Group C, were already through to the last 16 with wins in their opening two games.They will face one of the best third-placed teams in the next round.With qualification already secured, Algeria coach Djamel Belmadi made nine changes to the starting XI – handing a start to Slimani, who has been kept out of the team by in-form Al Sadd striker Baghdad Bounedjah.And Slimani took his chance after half an hour, netting his 27th international goal on his 61st appearance following a wonderful reverse through ball from Ounas.That was the breakthrough Algeria were searching for and Ounas made it 2-0 five minutes later after linking up with Slimani on the edge of the box to score his first international goal on just his seventh appearance.Tanzania, who had defended well for the first half an hour, could do nothing to prevent a third on the stroke of half-time as Slimani’s threaded pass found Ounas again and the midfielder coolly rounded the keeper before slotting into an empty net.Algeria had more chances after the break – Mohamed Salim Fares volleying Ounas’ delivery wide before hitting the outside of the right post from close-range.Manchester City winger Riyad Mahrez replaced Ounas in the second half but did not make an impact, while substitute Bounedjah wasted a great chance to make it 4-0 when he fired wide late on. Blackpool striker Adi Yussuf also came on for Tanzania in the second half but headed over the bar with minutes to spare.Tanzania, who were competing in their first Nations Cup since 1980, failed to progress to the knock-out stages and finished bottom of the group with three defeats.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Asa Goldstock’s aggressiveness isn’t working in her freshman year

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 7, 2017 at 11:14 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarez Syracuse goalkeeper Asa Goldstock has a problem. Opponents are taking her supposed strength and turning it into a weakness. Throughout her lacrosse career, Goldstock came out of the net more than other goalies do. But through seven games, college offenses have exposed her.“I’m a lot more active and more athletic than other goalies,” the freshman said. “I don’t really sit tight. I play more as another defender.”That’s left the goal empty, at times. In several games this season, she tried to jump out and intercept the ball. Other times, she ran the ball out to midfield, hesitated and threw the ball away. It happened in the season opener, then against Binghamton, then against Albany — when her flub almost cost SU the game — and last week against Virginia. SU head coach Gary Gait pulled her before halftime against UVA. (She reentered less than two minutes later).Goldstock’s tendency to come out of the net helped make her the No. 3 recruit in the country. But through seven games, No. 4 Syracuse’s (7-0, 2-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) play in goal has kept lesser teams in games longer than they should. Through seven games, Goldstock leads the team with 12 turnovers.The Niskayuna, New York, native didn’t start her career in net. Her lacrosse journey originated on attack with boys teams. Her cousin asked her to play goalie and she hasn’t left the spot since. She hasn’t lost the aggressiveness that came with playing attack. On club teams, Goldstock broke the seal of her crease and pressured opposing attacks. When Goldstock’s aggressive style of play worked, she began to push farther and farther out, her mother Tiffany Moore said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBefore the season, Goldstock said that in practice her strategy had worked. Junior attack Riley Donahue, who ranks second on the team in goals (13), said the freshman’s aggressiveness frustrates her. When the season started, Goldstock stumbled.In the second half against Binghamton, Goldstock sprung from her crease and intercepted a pass. As she looked around for an outlet, a Bearcats attack knocked the ball from her stick and gained possession.Teams invite Goldstock to come out of the net with the ball. Against Virginia, the freshman made a stop and immediately looked for a teammate but found none open. The Cavaliers matched up on every SU defender and midfielder, forcing Goldstock to take the ball up the field, more than 50 yards from her crease.When Goldstock’s feet crossed midfield, Gait yelled. As the shot clock ticked down in what was a close game, Gait called for her to pass the ball. Flustered, Goldstock flung a pass over the head of Kathy Rudkin and UVA regained possession.Goldstock saves 50.5 percent of shots faced, good for 16th in the country. She said she believes she has quickly adapted to the increased velocity of shots hurled at her by collegiate attackers and midfielders.Against Virginia, the Orange trailed 11-2 in the first half. Goldstock posted her worst save-percentage of the season (.317), but SU mounted a furious comeback to win. Asked why he took Goldstock out of the game and put her back in net just a minute later, Gait chuckled and sarcastically asked why he waited so long. Commentslast_img read more

Smith focuses on improving, regaining starting spot

first_imgJacob Schwoerer/The Badger HeraldThere are typically more than 100 players on a college football team, and they all have two things in common.(1) They all have a craving for playing time.(2) They have five years of eligibility to satisfy it.That means college football teams are rife with competition, and no player’s hold on a starting spot is immune to it.Wisconsin senior cornerback Devin Smith learned that the hard way last season.Starting all 13 games in the 2009-10 season as a sophomore, Smith led the team in passes defended (11) and pass breakups (nine) while finishing fourth in tackles (55). He also snagged two interceptions.Heading into his junior season, many expected Smith to become one of the Big Ten’s top defensive backs. Instead, he lost his starting spot and spent more time on the sidelines than on the field.At this time one year ago, as the football team gathered for its spring and summer camps, Smith fell victim to that competition. Teammates Antonio Fenelus and Niles Brinkley outplayed him for the two starring roles at corner.“I guess there was just good competition all the way around,” he said. “We were just constantly competing, and I started fighting injuries towards the end of summer as well. I just had to take the role I had and just do anything I could to make our team better.”Fenelus and Brinkley proceeded to earn honorable mention All-Big Ten designations, as voted on by the coaches (Fenelus also earned First Team by the media), while Smith was forced to fill in as a nickelback. He appeared in all 13 games, amassing 30 tackles and one interception.According to defensive backs coach and co-defensive coordinator Chris Ash – who now enters his second year at UW – last year’s reduced role humbled Smith but also taught him how to return to the starting lineup.“It’s difficult for anybody to go through that when they’ve been the guy on the field on game day, and then all of a sudden you’re standing there watching,” Ash said. “That’s a tough deal to go through, but he accepted it. Eventually he understood what he needed to do, and he’s gone and done it.”But with every year comes new opportunities. Brinkley has since gone on to graduate, leaving a clear shot for Smith to regain the role he enjoyed two years ago.Now, Smith is responding to any and all competition.“Before, things came easy for Devin, and then when other guys started to step up, he didn’t step up and now he’s learned to compete, and he’s competing right now to make himself the best he can be,” Ash said.After two weeks of spring camp, Smith has earned playing time with the first-team defense and appears to be the No. 1 candidate to start opposite Fenelus at cornerback this season.Throughout camp, Smith has dealt with a sprained AC joint – a joint in the top of the shoulder – although he has said it’s a “really minor” injury. The UW staff has given him a green jersey like quarterbacks wear for practice to make other players aware.However, that green jersey hasn’t prevented him from at least some kinds of drills involving contact. Thursday, he participated in bump and run drills with wide receivers and, despite his maimed shoulder, did not allow a single receiver to get past him without first disrupting the route too much. Saturday, he again practiced with the first team defense in a scrimmage.“I definitely think he’s embracing the role as the starting corner,” redshirt senior safety Aaron Henry said. “He’s definitely upped his level of play. He really hasn’t been doing anything that he wasn’t doing initially, but I think it’s just the confidence level. Last year he wasn’t as confident. I’m sure he’d tell you that, but going into spring ball, he’s a whole lot more confident. He knows he can play with anybody in the country.”When asked where the Smith’s strengths lie, Ash mentioned that although he does have a lot of talent, it’s the football IQ and technique that allow Smith to succeed.That’s lucky for Ash, because Smith still hopes to improve in those areas – as well as others – in the leadup to his senior year.“I’m really just focusing on my technique as a whole,” Smith said. “Also, I’m just trying to make sure I become a smarter player, just recognizing certain situations, being able to play a lot faster and just becoming a lock-down corner on my side where the rest of my team can count on me.”Now that’s competing.last_img read more