AV Jennings launches new Enclave community at Bridgeman Downs

first_imgAVJennings has launched a new community called the Enclave.Mr Young said the real appeal of Enclave was not only that people had the opportunity to build a new home but also they would be of exceptional quality, with design covenants in place to encourage architectural merit and a focus on sustainability in all dwellings.“Bridgeman Downs is transitioning into a leafy urban residential area and we’re offering a range of lot sizes to suit purchasers at all stages of life.” The AVJennings homes will boast up to 180sq m of living space, with separate living and dining areas, ducted airconditioning and an outdoor entertainment terrace. They will be four or three-bedroom houses, with a multipurpose room.Homesites are selling from $379,000. AVJennings is bridging a gap in the market for brand new architecturally designed homes and homesites in the sought after suburb of Bridgeman Downs.The launch of a new community at Bridgeman Downs is bridging the gap for new architecturally designed homes and homesites in the area.The new Enclave community will include just 38 homesites for purchasers looking to design and build their own dream home, as well as a collection of 15 architect-designed homes to be built by AVJennings.Construction on the new community has started, with land now selling and the first home makers expected to move in by early 2018.AVJennings development manager Barry Young said Bridgeman Downs was a popular area for families due to its location just 12km from the Brisbane CBD, with easy access to schools, shopping centres and parks in the leafy northern suburbs.“The 38 homesites range from 450sq m to 795sq m, giving ample room for a family home with a backyard, or a more compact abode for those looking to downsize,” Mr Young said. More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019“There has been little opportunity to secure a brand-new homesite or house and land package in Bridgeman Downs in recent years, so Enclave is a unique offering,” he said.last_img read more

CBCSA director leaves USC, to join Stanford

first_imgConerly became the CBCSA director in late 2016, having previously served as assistant director under former director Corliss Bennett. Conerly also served as an adjunct assistant professor at the Rossier School of Education while conducting research on how scholar practitioners oversee various cultural centers and how these centers help students of color. She received her doctorate in education from Rossier in 2016. Conerly will take on a new role at Stanford University in June, where she will serve as the associate dean of students and director of the Black Community Services Center. She also plans to expand her role as a consultant in Palo Alto. During her time at USC, Rosalind assisted employers with finding effective recruitment strategies and integrating professionals from marginalized communities to predominantly white institutions. “One of my top highlights [at USC] was our 40th anniversary,” she said. “Being able to celebrate and acknowledge the narratives of the students, the alumni that are now attached to CBCSA … it really made me reflect on understanding why this space is here and to see how it’s evolved.”   Rosalind Conerly will join Stanford University as the new associate dean of students. and director of the black community services center. (Photo courtesy of Rosalind Conerly) Prior to her departure, Conerly wanted to ensure that CBCSA had structures in place that would remain long after she left. She said she has focused her time on creating a safe, empowering space for students that would inspire them, and she hopes the University will take advantage of the increased calls for diversity and inclusion on campus and strengthen relationships with culture groups on campus. As the associate dean of students, her work will primarily focus on serving the black community at Stanford. She will also be working closely with their Black Alumni Association. Her first event will be the Stanford Black Alumni Summit in Hollywood, where she will introduce herself to BAA alumni and begin to transition into her new role. Conerly said she promises to stay connected and involved in USC campus life and events. Over her two-year tenure as CBCSA director, she mentored and engaged with students of color and helped create inclusion workshops around campus. center_img After working at the Center of Black Cultural and Student Affairs, for seven years, Director Rosalind Conerly will be leaving USC. Her last day at USC will be March 1. “I will be doing similar work, really overseeing a lot of the operations and vision planning,” she said in an interview with the Daily Trojan. “I will be managing a lot more people and initiatives.” “My time at USC has been truly life changing,” Conerly wrote in an email to CBCSA members. “And that is mostly due to the relationships I have been able to establish with students and colleagues over the years. You, in some way, have helped shape my experience, so thank you.” “She is sweet and a great leader,” said JaBrea Patterson-West, a junior majoring in French and art history. “She was always supportive of [the Black Student Assembly’s] e-board and was an important mentor and communicator of student needs, not just in the black community but [to] all cultural centers.”   “As our community grows, as our initiatives change, students need change,” she said. “I’m going to miss USC, there is definitely an energy on this campus … It’s something in the air here that really makes you excited to be here and to be a part of this Trojan Family.”last_img read more