Cutting turbulence injuries in half: the real-time connection

first_imgIn recent years, companies have zeroed in on the problem, trying—if not to tame it—at least better forecast C.A.T. so pilots can avoid bumpy areas. The latest advance and most promising is a deal among The Weather Company (an IBM Business) and Gogo Business Aviation. The arrangement will speed the delivery of real-time, turbulence-avoidance information to airline dispatch operations and pilots alike.The companies are able to do this, according to The Weather Company’s President Mark Gildersleeve by, “collecting massive amounts of data very quickly, and then using that insight to provide guidance to all flights that will be traveling through impacted airspace.”The result could spare passengers and crew alike the uncomfortable bumps. Traditionally, flight operations, pilots and aviation meteorologists have received coded verbal reports—reports containing limited information on actual, real-time flight conditions—via pilot reports, or PIREPS. Now, the Weather Company and Gogo say their Turbulence Auto PIREP System (TAPS) can communicate critical en-route weather information far faster, affording pilots a chance at avoiding sometimes-dangerous conditions. The payoff among those who employ the WSI Total Turbulence set-up is, say the two partner companies, a full 50% reduction in turbulence-related injuries and unnecessary maintenance inspections.AirlineRatings will have more on this important story in the near future. Nothing sets passengers’ teeth on edge and induces a fear of flying quite like turbulence, be it the weather-induced variety or C.A.T—clear air turbulence. Each year the nerve-wracking phenomena cost airlines some US$100 million. Turbulence remains the number one cause of non-fatal injuries aloft.Watch this spectacular video of a thunderstorm over Guatemala and South of Mexico. It was taken from a Boeing 767-300 by Noe Castillo of Videos de Aviacion. The thunderstormn action starts at 1.5 minutes in and is amazing.last_img read more

Doug Engelbart, Inventor Of The Mouse, Dies at 88

first_imgTags:#computers#now A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Family members report that Douglas Engelbart, American inventor and father of the computer mouse, passed away last night at the age of 88. Engelbart made a number of groundbreaking contributions to computing. His pioneering work on human-computer interactions at Stanford Research Institute (now SRI) paved the way for his prototype of the first mouse in 1963. That invention led to the development of a range of modern technologies, including hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces. Related Posts He was a dedicated evangelist of computers and their enormous potential for addressing urgent and complex problems, and was just recently featured in an article for The New York Times titled “Who Made That Mouse?”Born in Portland, Ore., as the middle son of three children, Engelbart married his first wife, Ballard, who died in 1997 after 47 years of marriage. He is survived by his second wife, Karen, and his four children. Here’s a video of Engelbart and his colleagues presenting the computer mouse in its public debut in 1968. Engelbart image via Wikipedia; playground mouse image via Flickr user bfishadow, CC 2.0 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… readwritelast_img read more

Invoke NSA for cow slaughter: U.P. DGP

first_imgUttar Pradesh Director General of Police Sulkhan Singh has asked officials to book those accused of cow slaughter or trafficking in cattle for slaughter under the National Security Act (NSA) and the Gangsters Act.“Cow slaughter and transportation of cattle for slaughter must be strictly prevented,” Mr. Singh told SPs and SSPs.This is not the first time that the State government has promised stringent punishment for cow slaughter.In 2014, the Akhilesh Yadav government gave its approval to slap the Gangsters Act and the Goondas Act on those accused of cow slaughter. The State government had made an amendment to the Acts to include the offence.Soon after taking charge in April, Mr. Singh vowed “strict action” against those involved in “vigilantism” for cow protection and asserted that no citizen had the “right to intervene.”However, his latest note to district police chiefs, comprising over 30 points, including instructions on handling cow slaughter, does not mention vigilante groups or the self-designated ‘gau rakshaks.’‘An intimidation’U.P. vice-president of the All India Jamiatul Quresh, Shakeel Qureshi, says that by issuing such orders, the State police were further intimidating those involved in cattle trade.“Such rules harass those involved in the business,” said Mr. Qureshi.He demanded that if those accused of cow slaughter or trafficking in cattle were to be booked under the NSA and the Gangsters Act, similar action should be taken against vigilante groups.last_img read more