Bernd Leno rates Arsenal’s top-four chances ahead of Manchester City clash

first_imgBernd Leno rates Arsenal’s top-four chances ahead of Manchester City clash Comment Leno is refusing to rule out Arsenal qualifying for the Champions League (Picture: Getty Images)Bernd Leno is refusing to rule out the possibility that Arsenal could still qualify for the Champions League, despite being eight points behind fourth-placed side Chelsea.The Gunners will resume their Premier League campaign next week in ninth position and face a tricky test against Manchester City as their first game back.The north London club’s results have slightly improved since Mikel Arteta took over from Unai Emery in December and they remain the only Premier League side not to have succumbed to defeat in 2020.With Manchester City awaiting the result of their appeal against their two-year ban from European football, there is a possibility that the fifth-placed side in the league could qualify for the Champions League.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTAlthough a trip to the Etihad is scarcely an enjoyable experience for Arsenal, goalkeeper Leno is looking forward to the test and feels his side are still in with a shot of getting back into Europe’s elite competition. Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterThursday 11 Jun 2020 9:25 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link3.7kShares The Gunners have had an upturn under Mikel Arteta (Picture: Getty Images)‘It’s a great way to start because we have to go full throttle right from the off – they’re an absolutely top team,’ said Leno in an interview with the DFB.‘It’ll be strange to play again after such a long time out and with such little time to prepare, but I’m optimistic about the rest of the season.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘I hope we can get into Europe. We’re not ruling out the Champions League places because we might get it with just fifth place, given Man City’s possible ban.‘We were in decent form before the break, I just hope we can get back to that when we return and end up in a European spot.’MORE: Mikel Arteta looks ahead to Manchester City clash and provides Arsenal fitness updateMORE: Mikel Arteta speaks out on Arsenal’s defeat to Brentford in friendlyFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisementlast_img read more

Empty nesters swapping houses for apartments in sought-after areas

first_imgMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours agoMirvac’s $200 million development Unison in Newstead is more than 90 per cent sold.“As empty nesters looking for a smaller home with all the benefits of city living at our fingertips, Unison is perfect,” Mr Loy said.“The location is superb, with access to the CityCat just a short walk away and the precinct’s great restaurants and shops literally on our doorstep.”The final collection of Unison apartments are now available starting at $437,000 for a one-bedroom apartment.Mirvac has sold more than 90 per cent of Unison’s apartments, with $165 million in settlements and construction recently finalised.Mirvac Queensland Residential general manager Warwick Bible said a significant proportion of sales had come from local buyers looking to downsize from their homes.“We’ve seen a clear trend towards functional apartment living from buyers currently residing in more traditional dwellings within Brisbane’s inner-north suburbs,” Mr Bible said.“Unison has been very popular with Brisbane buyers, demonstrating the vast appeal Unison holds for those who don’t want to compromise on size or quality to get the benefit of apartment living so close to the CBD.” Unison at Newstead is more than 90 per cent sold with 240 homeowners already moving into the $200 million Mirvac development.EMPTY nesters looking for quality finishes and a central location are one of 240 home buyers who have snapped up an apartment in Mirvac’s $200 million Unison development in Newstead.Graham and Dianne Loy have bought their second Mirvac-built home, opting for a three-bedroom two-bathroom apartment in Unison.“Given our previous home in Wakerley was also built by Mirvac, we already knew the standard of finish would be exceptional,” Mr Loy said.“In addition to its low-maintenance layout and amazing views, the apartment is considerably larger than anything we’d every expected to have in such a central location and the quality of our fixtures, fittings and appliances is second to none.”Mr Loy said Unison’s proximity to the CBD was also a big drawcard.last_img read more

Maersk Drilling gets jack-up contract under alliance framework with Aker BP

first_imgJack-up Maersk Integrator  Offshore driller Maersk Drilling and oil company Aker BP have agreed to a one-year contract to deploy the Maersk Integrator rig on the Norwegian shelf from June 2019. Maersk Integrator; Source: Maersk DrillingThe contract is founded on the alliance that the parties entered into in 2017, the two companies informed on Thursday, September 6.The Maersk Integrator will become the first rig to be contracted fully under the scope of the alliance between Aker BP, Maersk Drilling and Halliburton. When the high-performance jack-up rig finishes its current campaign on Gina Krog in June 2019, it will go directly to Ula for a new one-year assignment with Aker BP. The alliance The tripartite alliance was announced last year and focuses on working in collaborative relationships which maximize value for all parties involved. This is established in contracts using a shared incentives model, thereby securing mutual commitment to reduce waste and deliver value. The contracts are based on market-rate terms but add the possibility of a sizeable upside for all parties, based on actual delivery and performance.“This contract really symbolises the close working relationship between Aker BP and Maersk Drilling that we established in late 2017. This is the first contract fully founded on our alliance framework. With shared incentives, all parties will work as one team towards delivering safe and efficient operations at the lowest possible well cost,” says Jørn Madsen, CEO of Maersk Drilling.In the tripartite jack-up alliance, the parties are exploring new ways of collaborating to increase the efficiency of drilling campaigns. In addition to setting up shared goals and incentives, it includes integrated project organizations, aligned safety procedures, and a one-team mindset guided by the principles of ‘best man for the job’ and ‘best for the alliance’. Maersk Integrator is an XL Enhanced ultra-harsh environment jack-up rig that is customised for the North Sea. The rig is currently stationed at the Gina Krog field on the Norwegian shelf where it has been engaged in its first-ever drilling campaign since June 2015. When that campaign finishes in June 2019, the rig will move south to the Ula field to deploy for Aker BP. As an integral part of the alliance framework, Halliburton will function as service provider for the new campaign.“With this contract, we will truly see the value of our alliance as we work together to reduce waste and lower the cost per barrel on Ula. The collaboration between our companies is under continuous development due to the alliance, and we expect to gain more and more mutual benefits from working together in new and innovative ways,” says Tommy Sigmundstad, SVP Drilling and Wells at Aker BP.Maersk Drilling, Aker BP and Halliburton entered the joint jack-up alliance in November 2017. The alliance aims at lowering the cost per barrel and increasing profitability for the partners through implementation of digital solutions, increased collaboration efficiency, and standardization and simplification of processes. It is formalised in a five-year agreement with the option to extend for an additional five years.With this contract, Maersk Drilling has added a total of 2,373 days and $313 million to its backlog in 2018.It is also worth mentioning that Aker BP last week awarded a new two-year contract to reactivate and quickly deploy jack-up rig Maersk Reacher in the Norwegian part of the North Sea.last_img read more

Full house for Dawson County opener

first_imgBy Kelly Ninas Putting on a dominating performance was Flohrs, the green to checkered leader in the Mach-1 Sport Compact feature. No stranger to the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car winner’s circle, Nichols was able to drive where the leaders weren’t for much of the first half of the feature before he took the lead by passing Bo Egge on the ninth lap and never looked back. Getting their season started off on the right foot by punching their ticket to the Chesterman’s Coca-Cola Winners Circle were the quintet of Dakota Sproul, Robbie Thome, Mike Nichols, Zach Olmstead and Rileigh Flohrs.  LEXINGTON, Neb. (Aug. 2) – Hitting the dirt running was an understatement when describing the outstanding show seen by the jam-packed house of avid racing fans at Dawson County Raceway Sunday evening.  Showing his cards early paid off for Sproul as he scored the IMCA Modified victory. Sproul started the on the inside of the second row, made the move into the lead on the fourth lap and never looked back. Coming from deep in the field, fifth row starter Olmstead of Overton was able to finish his rollercoaster weekend by winning the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock feature. Olmstead got to the front on lap seven. Zach Olmstead raced from the fifth row to the front of the field to win the Sunday IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock feature at Dawson County Raceway. (Photo by Tamie Thurn) Leading the laps that mattered the most, Thome was the victor in the Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod feature. Thome got to third early on and was up to second when leader Brett Berry slowed and relinquished the lead. Thome led the final laps to claim the victory. last_img read more

Ball backs Black Cats to shine

first_img The 48-year-old former Black Cats midfielder was asked to step into the breach for the second time at the weekend following Paolo Di Canio’s untimely sacking. Having guided the side he inherited from the Italian to a 2-0 Capital One Cup third-round victory over Peterborough in midweek, the interim head coach, to give him his full title, is now finalising preparations for the more daunting proposition of Liverpool’s Barclays Premier League visit to the Stadium of Light on Sunday. Ball, who has put himself forward as a possible replacement for Di Canio, is under no illusions as to the task ahead for however long he remains in the post – he was initially asked to take charge for two games – but thinks the kind of passion which fuelled his own playing days exists within the current squad despite the events of recent weeks. He said: “You would like to think it is always there for them. You have got to understand as a coach, we have a role to play, but that’s got to come from them, the responsibility has got to lie with them. “We can help them, we can facilitate stuff, but that’s got to come from them. “In the time we have had them, we have watched it closely, but we have tried to make it good footballing sessions. “There has always got to be a time for a laugh and a joke, but they have also got to understand it’s work.” Ball has stepped seamlessly from his role as senior professional development coach into the hot-seat vacated by Di Canio, but admits he has no clear idea how long he may remain in charge. He revealed after Tuesday night’s game that he hoped to discuss his situation with club officials this week, but such has been the level of activity both at the training ground and in the boardroom, that did not happen. Ball said: “I really haven’t had a chance. There are obviously people you speak to in passing, you might have a five-minute meeting. Kevin Ball believes there is enough pride and fight within the Sunderland dressing room to get the club out of trouble. “But at this moment in time, I wouldn’t have honestly said to you that I am any further forward than what I spoke to you about the other night.” Owner Ellis Short, having held consultations with director of football Roberto De Fanti, is continuing to consider his options with Gus Poyet concertedly trumpeting his own cause, although there is understood to be an element at the Stadium of Light pushing for the appointment of a British coach, or at least a man with experience of managing in the Premier League. The club have kept their own counsel since the official announcement of Di Canio’s departure, although full-back Ondrej Celustka admitted to Czech press agency CTK that he had been disappointed at the decision. He said: “In my opinion, the decision was a bit hasty because he was building the team and in the summer, 14 new players – including me – arrived. It needs some time to settle down. “But on the other hand, to win just one point from five (games) is simply not good.” In the meantime, Ball will look forward to a reunion with Liverpool midfielder Jordan Henderson, a man he nursed through the Academy ranks on Wearside before he broke into the first team and ultimately won his £16million move to Anfield. He said: “He made sure the pathway was open. It wasn’t like the pathway wasn’t there, but he went along it and said, ‘I’m going this way’. “If one day it got a bit hard, he fought his way through it. In the time he was at the club, he was brilliant, and not just in his football. “If it wasn’t going well for him, he would find a way of making it right. He always challenged himself day in, day out, week in, week out. “If it wasn’t right, ‘I’ll make it right’. It wasn’t a case of, ‘Oh well, I’ll just accept it’, so that’s probably why you will subsequently see Jordan Henderson will get better and better as his career goes on.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Study Indicates Number of Infected with Coronavirus off by Hundreds of Thousands in LA

first_imgThe Los Angeles Times is reporting that hundreds of thousands of Los Angeles County residents may have been infected with the coronavirus by early April, far outpacing the number of officially confirmed cases, according to a report released Monday.The initial results from the first large-scale study tracking the spread of the coronavirus in the county found that 4.1% of adults have antibodies to the virus in their blood, an indication of past exposure. That translates to roughly 221,000 to 442,000 adults who have recovered from an infection, according to the researchers conducting the study. The county had reported fewer than 8,000 cases at that time. The findings also suggest the fatality rate may be much lower than previously thought. This discrepancy also means that the U.S. could be inching closer to herd immunity which is when most of a population is immune to an infectious disease because they’ve had it. Usually 70% to 90% of a population needs immunity to achieve herd immunity which absent a vaccine, would be key to a return to normal life. The early results from L.A. County come three days after Stanford researchers reported that the coronavirus appears to have circulated much more widely in Santa Clara County than previously thought.Though the county had reported roughly 1,000 cases in early April, the Stanford researchers estimate the actual number was 48,000 to 81,000.The findings indicate that a significant portion of those carrying the virus apparently don’t show no symptoms at all, and therefore are unknowingly infecting others.Dr. Deborah Birx, the coordinator of President Trump’s coronavirus task force, said during the White House briefing that the USC results underscore “concern about asymptomatic spread” because it is harder to trace.“This has been the fundamental question to begin with,” she said, emphasizing the importance of treating the disease as “highly contagious.”The news out of Los Angeles is in line with the exclusive reporting 850WFTL did last month on the true number of exposures to COVID-19 and when infections really began.Infectious diseases expert Dr. Aileen Marty from FIU in Miami told Jen and Bill on March 16th, that the novel coronavirus numbers in the U.S. are wrong today because the disease has been here infecting us for months. Therefore, she says the number of confirmed cases and deaths in America and are too low. Dr. Marty believes infections in the U.S. began in January 2020. Click here for more on 850 WFTL’s reporting from March 16th.last_img read more

Semester in Review: Badgers go into the break

first_imgBRYAN FAUST & GREGORY DIXON/Herald photosFOOTBALLBret Bielema’s rookie season can’t get much better.Well, a win at the Capital One Bowl on New Year’s Day would do the trick.But regardless of the outcome in Orlando, the Badgers can take pride in producing one of the greatest seasons in the history of the program.The 2006 Wisconsin football team, without the benefit of a bowl game just yet, has already posted UW’s highest win total in any individual season ever, with an astounding 11-1 record nobody thought possible five months ago.Why were the Badgers written off before the season began? Consider:An offense with just three returning starters. John Stocco became one of the elite quarterbacks in the Big Ten, P.J. Hill was a more-than-pleasant surprise as a freshman tailback and Joe Thomas was simply the best lineman in all of college football, as affirmed by his recent capture of the Outland Trophy.A defense without any top stars. Mike Hankwitz’s unit was the strong point coming out of fall camps, to be sure. But there didn’t seem to be one guy that stepped up as the rock of the defense. Perhaps that was just the thing UW’s defense needed, as steady contributors Jonathan Casillas, Jason Chapman, Jack Ikegwuonu, Joe Stellmacher, Mark Zalewski and others helped Wisconsin’s defense.Can you say: rookie coach? Bret Bielema can’t. Not only did Bielema coach like a seasoned veteran; he acted as such off the field, saying all the right things and emerging as the fearless leader of the Wisconsin team that supposedly “overachieved” in 2006.The No. 6 AP ranking and a trip to a New Year’s Day bowl? Doesn’t get much better.-Aaron BrennerVOLLEYBALLEven though Wisconsin’s volleyball team posted another successful season, finishing with a 26-7 record, it ended in postseason disappointment yet again.Wisconsin tipped off the season by hosting the AVCA Volleyball Showcase, hosting fellow top-ranked teams Washington, Texas and Ohio. And while the Badgers dropped their first game to the Longhorns, freshman outside hitter Brittney Dolgner had her coming-out party in a five-game match against the Ohio Bobcats by posting a team-high 13 kills in game two.Dolgner would continue to pace the Badgers all season long, leading the team with 4.12 kills per game en route to being named to the All-Big Ten team, the first freshman in Wisconsin school history to do so.Senior floor captain and outside hitter Maria Carlini suffered a foot injury early in the Big Ten season, causing Wisconsin to cough up a two-game lead to Ohio State on the road.The Badgers soon found their stride, however, and it was evident when the No. 2 Penn State Nittany Lions came to the Field House on October 27. Not only did Wisconsin beat Penn State for the first time since 2003, but it did so in a commanding sweep.Wisconsin headed into the postseason having won nine of its last 10 matches and hoped to improve upon its Elite Eight finishes of the previous three years.The tenth-seeded Badgers swept through the first round, but were then paired against the team they played to start the season, the Texas Longhorns. This time playing at Texas, Wisconsin’s season ended just like it started — swept by the Longhorns.-Michael PoppyMEN’S SOCCERLike many unfortunate men, the Wisconsin men’s soccer team (9-8-2, 3-3-1 Big Ten) climaxed much too early this past season. After starting off warm with a 3-3 record in the beginning of the year, the Badgers turned up the heat and went on a six-game unbeaten streak, rising to the top of the Big Ten in the process and securing a No. 22 national ranking.Unfortunately, the Badgers dropped their last four games, including a match to Indiana that would have given Wisconsin the Big Ten title. Following its 1-0 loss to Michigan in the first round of the Big Ten Tournament, Wisconsin did not receive an NCAA bid and its 2006 campaign came to an abrupt end.On the bright side, the Badgers did come — albeit not long enough — to play this season. Senior Jake Settle started in all 19 matches between the posts and tallied eight shutouts and 61 saves. For his efforts, Settle earned the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week honor three separate times and was named to the all-conference second team. Also starting in every match were core senior defenders Hamid Afsari and Aaron Hohlbein.While Afsari made the College Soccer News National Team of the week back in October, Hohlbein took home a slew of awards at the end of the year. After first receiving a unanimous first-team selection for the Big Ten all-conference squad, Hohlbein was then named a third-team NSCAA All-American. The dynamic defender now looks forward to a possible selection in the 2007 MLS SuperDraft.In addition to Settle and Hohlbein, three other players on head coach Jeff Rohrman’s squad received all-conference honors at seasons end — Victor Diaz earned second-team honors while Eric Conklin and Pablo Delgado were each named to the all-freshman squad.Despite losing eight seniors, the Badgers now look forward to the spring season.-Matthew KrejcarekWOMEN’S SOCCERThe Wisconsin’s women’s soccer team came into this season looking to build off last year’s Big Ten Tournament title and its appearance in the NCAA tournament. Unfortunately, the Badgers were unable to reach those marks again this season.The Badgers fell to Illinois 3-0 in the first round of the Big Ten tournament, bringing to an end a season that was filled with streaky play and missed opportunities.”One or two little things can change your season,” head coach Dean Duerst said. “Momentum was probably the biggest factor; we didn’t catch a ride of momentum.”On offense, the Badgers were led by sophomore forward Taylor Walsh with 17 points. Five other players registered at least nine points during the year, but even with such balanced scoring, the team could still go cold. The team was shutout six times during the year, including five of its last six matches of the season.The Badgers were not consistent enough on the defensive side of the ball for Duerst’s liking either. The team registered five shutouts during the year, but still gave up 1.42 goals per game, putting them second to last in the Big Ten.”We were just a little too inconsistent,” Duerst saidWhile the season may have seemed like a down year, there were some things that pleasantly surprised Duerst this year. He liked seeing the offense with its balanced scoring and he liked that some freshmen got quite a bit of playing time. Four freshmen specifically saw action in at least 12 matches.Regardless of how the team was going to finish this year, it was going to be a special season because it marked the 25th anniversary of the women’s soccer program. Duerst said it was a great experience for his team.”A lot of alumni came back and our team got to experience their stories on a real special night,” he said. “That’s something I’ll remember forever.”-Karl AndersonWOMEN’S BASKETBALLOnly one game remains for the Wisconsin women’s basketball team before they begin their Big Ten season. Friday’s game will match the Badgers up against the Harvard Crimson. Like Wisconsin, Harvard (2-6, 0-0 Ivy League) has several talented freshmen that have already seen action on the court this season.The next two weeks will provide the team to get some much-needed rest. Earlier in the season, many of the Badger players suffered from the flu, including standout guard Jolene Anderson and head coach Lisa Stone. After resting for a few days, Anderson bounced back with her best performance of the year, scoring 28 points in a win over Albany.”We’ve just got to stay together,” Anderson said. “Hopefully we go into the Big Ten season 12-1, but if we’re not, then we can’t hang our heads low because we’ve still got Big Ten teams to play against.”Wisconsin will kick off the Big Ten season with a game against Northwestern (7-3, 0-0 Big Ten) at the Kohl Center on Dec. 28 and will then travel to East Lansing on New Years Eve to play Michigan State in one of their toughest games of the year. The Spartans are currently ranked 18 in the AP Poll and have a record of 7-1.The Badgers will also play Minnesota and Michigan on the road in early January, and will return to Madison to take on Illinois on Jan. 14 and eighth-ranked Ohio State four days later in what should prove to be another tough test.”We just need to play hard,” UW forward Caitlin Gibson said. “Once we get into the Big Ten [season], it’s going to be a lot different. They’re bigger, they’re faster, and they’re stronger.”-Tyler MasonWOMEN’S HOCKEYDespite settling for two ties last weekend against St. Cloud St., the No. 2 UW Women’s hockey team will still head into their winter break atop the WCHA leaderboard with 27 points, four ahead of second-place MinnesotaBeginning the season as the defending champions and nation’s top ranked team, the Badgers (16-1-3, 12-1-3 WCHA) won 13 of their first 14 games and extended their record unbeaten streak to 26 games before finally falling to Minnesota-Duluth 2-0 on Nov. 24.Strong play by goalies Christine DuFour and Jessie Vetter, who have been splitting time between the pipes, have anchored the Badger defense, while senior Sara Bauer, who broke the school’s all-time women’s scoring record already this year, has led the offense and is currently the leading scorer in the country. Fellow Badgers Jinelle Zaugg, Meghan Duggan and Erika Lawler are also among the nation’s point leaders.The Badgers will return from their month long break on Jan. 5 when they travel to Minnesota to take on the arch-rival Gophers. Control of the conference will be at stake as a Badger sweep would put the team far ahead of the pack for the conference’s top spot.Following a non-conference visit from Providence the following weekend, the Badgers will play five straight conference series, including a rematch with the only team to beat them, Minnesota-Duluth, before heading into the post-season.With the WCHA playoffs and NCAA tournament fast approaching the Badgers will be looking to play their best hockey in the second half of the season as they hope to repeat last year’s performance as national champions.-Mike Ackersteinlast_img read more

Joseph shows progress, but continues to struggle in Syracuse’s win over Louisiana Tech

first_img Published on December 14, 2014 at 10:32 pm Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+ Twenty seconds was all it took for a full wave of the Kaleb Joseph roller-coaster ride.Right after feeding forward Chris McCullough for a basket, the point guard was ducking the feet of a dunking Erik McCree — a result of Joseph’s own blunder.“He’s trying to do his best at what he does,” senior Rakeem Christmas said. “He’s trying to find open people and I think he’s overthinking. We’ll go through the film and we’ll go through all the things he can’t do and we’ll be fine.”The aggression that Joseph has pledged to maintain on the offensive end bit him more than it helped him on Sunday afternoon. Although he hinted at progress by shooting efficiently with nine points in Syracuse’s (6-3) 71-69 win over Louisiana Tech (7-3) in the Carrier Dome, Joseph more so resembled the freshman point guard he is by committing a season-high eight turnovers to go along with his four assists in a full 40 minutes.And those mistakes drew the brunt of head coach Jim Boeheim’s assessment of his first-year floor general after the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Kaleb made some really good plays today, but he can’t make those unforced (mistakes),” Boeheim said. “A couple of them were traps — you turn it over, that’s OK. But he can’t make the unforced ones that he made … because his turnovers are right in the open where they’re scoring.”Joseph turned it over twice in the opening five minutes — the first one trying to beat the Bulldogs’ press, the second one a late bounce pass to the middle of the floor that McCree grabbed for a transition dunk.Yet through the following five minutes, Joseph responded by hitting a jumper from the free-throw line, calmly draining a wide-open 3 off a pass from Christmas, and sinking a floater from the lane.But after that were two ill-advised attempts to push the ball ahead on the break. By halftime, Joseph had efficiently hit three of his five shots, but had already surpassed his season-high with five turnovers.“Obviously he made a couple of mistakes, but that’ll happen,” forward Tyler Roberson said. “I trust him as a point guard.”SU was ahead by nine with 8:33 left, but that lead slowly dissolved as a pair of Joseph turnovers directly led to Louisiana Tech points and the Bulldogs cut into the deficit. He clanked a wide-open 3-pointer that would’ve put the Orange up by seven with 1:58 remaining.With the score tied 69, Joseph’s drive to the basket in the final 10 seconds was a feeble layup attempt that was deflected by Michale Kyser and never had a chance.Yet the mere fact that Joseph — who left the locker room before reporters arrived for postgame interviews — was on the floor with the game on the line is an improvement from last week, as slight as it is.After turning the ball over in the final minute of the Orange’s loss to Michigan on Dec. 4, Joseph only saw the floor in four seconds of the last 13 minutes of SU’s 69-57 loss to St. John’s on Dec. 6.But as a scorer, he was a useful sidekick to Syracuse’s primary scorers on Sunday — an attempt to disprove Boeheim’s statement after the SJU loss that Joseph’s not a 3-point shooter. The point guard earned his crunch-time minutes against the Bulldogs, even though he didn’t make much of them.“He’s just not really a point guard yet. He’s trying to learn how to play the point,” Boeheim said, before pausing for five seconds.“It’s going to take him a long time to.” Commentslast_img read more

Institute for Global Health discusses HIV epidemic, human rights

first_imgMandeep Dhaliwal, director of the United Nations Development Programme, and Jeffrey O’Malley, former director of UNICEF’s Division of Data, Research, and Policy, spoke about HIV in Africa and India. (Sunny Dong | Daily Trojan)The USC Institute for Global Health held an event on Wednesday to discuss the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, the HIV epidemic and human rights. The event is part of the “Wicked Problems” multi-disciplinary practicum, a hands-on course for select USC students to tackle local issues of health, inequality and sustainability, but the seminar was open to the public.Mandeep Dhaliwal, director of the United Nations Development Programme HIV, Health and Development Group was joined by Jeffrey O’Malley, former director of UNICEF’s Division of Data, Research, and Policy.Dhaliwal, a physician and lawyer, joined the United Nations Development Programme in 2008, and spearheaded the creation of the Global Commission on HIV and the Law. Her work focuses on HIV/AIDS research, care and human rights issues in countries like Africa and India. Dhaliwal outlined the UN’s 2030 agenda for sustainable development, which was adopted in 2015 by 193 member countries. “The Sustainable Development Goals are 17 interconnected goals with 169 targets,” Dhaliwal said. “The SDGs are much more narrowly focused … and the agenda is universal and indivisible.” Zero hunger, gender equality and clean water and sanitation are a few examples of the broad goals the organization hopes to achieve. While they are broad in language, the SDGs serve as a guiding framework for global cooperation, according to Dhaliwal. “[HIV] is one of the wicked problems of global health,” Dhaliwal said. “The global response has been remarkable on a number of fronts …  [demonstrating] the power of human rights and solidarity across governments.” O’Malley specifically  commented on the diseases’ impact on the LGBTQ community. “Why are queer people and queer issues linked to the SDGs?,” O’Malley said. “We need to understand how the SDG framework works for people with disabilities, queer people, migrants. Looking at these marginalized groups is a way to test whether this framework works for everybody.” Global health is rooted in a history of marginalization, he said. “The roots of global health are not altruistic. They were not about helping marginalized people or poor people,” O’Malley said. The event attracted both graduate and undergraduate students from all fields of study. Jake Anderson, a sophomore studying global health, attended the talk to hear about issues not discussed in the classroom. “We are future leaders in this profession,” Anderson said. “I think it’s interesting to see the progress that is trying to be made and to use that to see what it is I want to do with my life.” Sofia Gruskin, the director of the USC Institute for Global Health and a professor of preventative medicine and law, noted that both speakers were able to blend their passions with strategic thinking. “[The speakers] move policy and programs in the UN [and] work with governments and civil society around the world,” Gruskin said. “The world is a more inclusive and open place because of their work.”last_img read more

Women of Troy win two overtime thrillers

first_imgFollow us on Twitter @dailytrojan The USC women’s soccer team flipped the script this weekend, capturing dramatic overtime wins over Oregon and Oregon State after a season of tough breaks.Freshman forward Kayla Mills delivered the winner in Friday’s contest, before Jamie Fink did the same with a final minute penalty kick on Sunday. Both games ended 2-1 in favor of USC.The two wins spelled the end of a difficult three-game stretch, in which the squad lost to Arizona, Colorado and Utah by just one goal. The Women of Troy now stand at 8-9-2, with a 3-6-1 mark in Pac-12 play.USC fell behind early to the visiting Ducks on Friday, yielding a goal to the Ducks’ Kristen Parr in the fifth minute of the match.Junior goalkeeper Caroline Stanley would respond with a lockdown performance, allowing only one goal over the next five periods of play over the weekend.After a tense 70 minutes, sophomore Katie Johnson delivered the equalizer midway through the second half. After a scoreless rest of the half, the Women of Troy began their chase of a first overtime win. Senior forward Elizabeth Eddy and freshman forward Tanya Samarzich both had solid chances for USC, as did Oregon’s Mia Gunter.It was Mills who would be the hero, however, with a slicing goal past Oregon keeper Abby Steele in the final minute of the first overtime period. This win got the proverbial monkey off of USC’s back, and set up another exciting win on Sunday.The Women of Troy fell behind immediately for the second straight contest against Oregon State when the Beavers scored on the first shot of the game at the 46-second mark. This time, however, USC would strike back immediately.Eddy converted a penalty kick just seven minutes later after senior defender Autumn Altimirano was fouled in the box.After a quiet first half, the USC offense exploded for 19 shots in the second half to the Beavers’ three. Unfortunately, the team could not convert, and went to overtime for the second straight game.In a heartstopping moment early in the extra period, a yellow card from Marlee Carrillo set up a Beavers free kick just 17 yards from the goal. The USC defense would come through with a block, setting up an unbelievable finish.With just 17 seconds left in the last period, Oregon State was called for a handball in the box.The foul set up the winning penalty kick from Fink. As the penalty was called, USC coach Ali Khosroshahin was in disbelief.“I couldn’t believe we got a call that late in the game,” he said. “But good things happen when you put up 43 shots.”It was a heartstopping yet fitting final homestand for the Women of Troy, who celebrated seniors Eddy, Altamirano, Mia Bruno, Jordan Marada, and Haley Boysen on Sunday in a pregame ceremony.The team moves on to their final game of the season this Thursday night, a road matchup against archrival UCLA.The Bruins are at the top of the Pac-12 and ranked No. 2 in the nation. The Women of Troy will attempt to duplicate last year’s result, when they toppled UCLA at home on a buzzer-beating goal from Marada.last_img read more