HMAS Tobruk Arrives in Philippines

first_img HMAS Tobruk Arrives in Philippines Training & Education View post tag: Arrives View post tag: Tobruk Back to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Tobruk Arrives in Philippines View post tag: Philippines View post tag: Defence November 27, 2013 View post tag: HMAS HMAS Tobruk has arrived to commence recovery support operations in the Ormoc region of Leyte Island to assist the Philippines government repair the damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan.HMAS Tobruk, which sailed from Townsville on 18 November with a Recovery Support Force onboard, arrived yesterday and is disembarking Army personnel from Townsville’s 3rd Combat Engineer Regiment today by landing craft. The engineers will commence a range of tasks from tomorrow, including road clearing and quick impact tasks such as debris clean-up in public areas.Commander of Joint Task Force 630 Lieutenant Colonel Rod Lang, from the Army’s Deployable Joint Task Force Headquarters in Brisbane, says the area received widespread damage from the typhoon and will benefit greatly from Australian assistance.“We visited this area last week and it was devastated. Most houses were destroyed or without roofs, but despite this the people were calm and doing the best they could,” Lieutenant Colonel Lang said.“The Joint Task Force of Navy, Army and Air Force elements will provide assistance, together with other Australian government agencies, to the Philippines government to help the people of the region recover and move on with their lives.”A reconnaissance by Defence and Australian government personnel last week in the Ormoc region highlighted the widespread damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan. Local Philippine officials estimated most structures in the region suffered some form of damage from high winds and identified the area would benefit greatly from Australian assistance.The Recovery Support Force is supported by a team of Navy, Army, Air Force and Australian government personnel based at Ormoc Airport on the Island of Leyte and Mactan International Airport at Cebu. Airlift support to the task force is being provided by Royal Australian Air Force C-130J Hercules and C-17A Globemaster aircraft.Including those embarked in HMAS Tobruk, more than 500 ADF personnel are deployed in support of Operation PHILIPPINES ASSIST.[mappress]Press Release, November 27, 2013; Image: Australian Navy View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval Share this article View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Defenselast_img read more

Oxford student launches new app which crowdsources information about venue accessibility

first_imgThe app provides details such as the number of steps, if a ramp is available, how wide the doors are, or how big the bathroom is at a particular venue. You can follow SociAbility’s progress on their Twitter, @sociabilityapp, where you can find latest updates. The app is intended make it easier for disabled people in finding out which pubs, cafes, bars, and restaurants are accessible. “This is access information that works – get the details you need to judge accessibility for yourself. We need your help, Oxford! Join the community by signing up on our website at www.sociability.app!” It is reported to be launching in June this year. The app’s supporters include The Oxford Hub, Lincoln College, and the University’s Van Houten Fund. The SociAbility website states: “By making it quick, easy, and free to find access information, SociAbility is empowering people with access needs to enjoy greater social engagement, and to socialise with greater confidence, purpose, and ease.” It also highlights its potential effects on the social spaces themselves, arguing that “SociAbility helps [venue owners] to better appreciate how these [accessibility] barriers might be affecting your business.” Matt Pierri told Cherwell: “SociAbility is an ambitious start-up working to empower disabled people to enjoy greater social engagement and inclusion.  “Right now, it’s simply too difficult to find out whether a venue is accessible or not. For the millions of people with access needs worldwide, this can make socialising with family and friends stressful and unenjoyable.  Australian lawyer and entrepreneur Matthew Pierri created the app, SociAbility, in order to fill an “unmet need” in the disabled community. “The SociAbility app makes it quick and easy to find detailed, reliable and accurate access information for local venues (cafés, restaurants, bars etc) and shops. We’re building a database for the community, by the community.”  “Simply download the app, fill in key access details about your favourite venues (eg. the number of stairs, door widths, photos), and help make the world a more sociable place for all! Pierri, who recently completed a Master of Public Policy at the University’s Blavatnik School of Government, based the idea from his own experiences as a wheelchair user in Oxford. He is the CEO and founder of the project. last_img read more

Free Yellow Cab Rides on New Year’s Eve

first_imgTwitterFacebook FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Free Yellow Cab Rides on New Year’s EveDECEMBER 26TH, 2018 TYRONE MORRIS EVANSVILLE, INDIANALogan’s Promise is making sure everyone has a safe option to get home through the new year. Logan’s Promise is teaming up with River City Yellow Cab to provide free rides home through January 1st.Logan’s Promise urges drivers to have a plan if they choose to drink and not get behind the wheel.The organization honors late Reitz football player Logan Brown who was killed in a head-on crash by a drunk driver in March of 2015.With New Year’s Eve coming up those behind Logan’s Promise encourage everyone to take advantage of the safe option.Parent Charles Brown says, “The goal is just to keep people off the street and allow people to make good choices and those people that are out on the streets to have a safe path home.”The service is for residents of Vanderburgh, Posey, Warrick and Gibson Counties.People wanting to use the service will have to call Yellow Cab or use the Nextaxi app.last_img read more

Town Hall Meeting on Ninth Street Corridor Set for Oct. 6

first_imgMayor Jay A. Gillian has announced that he will hold a town hall meeting to solicit ideas and feedback on plans for the Ninth Street corridor in Ocean City. The meeting is set for 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, in the main auditorium of the Ocean City Tabernacle at 550 Wesley Avenue. All are invited to attend and participate.A brief presentation will outline past efforts and present opportunities to beautify the gateway to Ocean City and streamline traffic. The meeting will include information about efforts to preserve open space, and it also will address issues related to the length of the corridor from bay to boardwalk. The public is encouraged to come with questions, concerns and ideas.The mayor will be joined by City Council members. For more information, please call 609-525-9286.last_img read more

New dean for HGSE

first_imgJames E. Ryan, one of the nation’s leading scholars of education law and policy, will become the next dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), President Drew Faust announced today.Ryan, an award-winning teacher who has served on the University of Virginia faculty since 1998, succeeds Kathleen McCartney, who will leave Harvard to become president of Smith College on July 1.Ryan will officially assume his new role on Sept. 1, near the start of the 2013-14 academic year. Richard J. Murnane, the Juliana W. and William Foss Thompson Professor of Education and Society at the HGSE, will serve as acting dean from July 1 until Ryan begins his tenure.[Read a question-and-answer session with the new dean here.]“Jim Ryan is an outstanding scholar, teacher, and academic leader with a deep passion for improving education and for enhancing the interplay of scholarship, practice, and policy,” Faust said. “Throughout the search, I have been impressed by his seamless integration of the intellectual and the practical, his warm and open personal style, and his evident talent for drawing together people from different backgrounds, disciplines, and points of view.“He has a keen interest in how diverse modes of academic research can benefit education practice and policy,” Faust added, “and how the concrete challenges facing educational leaders and policymakers, as well as teachers and students, can helpfully inform the scholarship and teaching we do here. He is also an astute and empathetic listener, and I know he looks forward to connecting with people across the HGSE in the coming weeks and months as he prepares to take up his new role.”“I am honored and excited by this opportunity, and grateful to Drew Faust for inviting me to take on this role at such a critical time in education and in the life of the School,” said Ryan. “Kathy McCartney’s extraordinary leadership has generated great momentum, and I’m eager to build on that progress in close collaboration with remarkably talented faculty, staff, and students within the Ed School and across the University. Understanding how students learn, enhancing educational achievement, and expanding educational opportunity are among the defining challenges of our time, and the HGSE has an essential leadership role to play in meeting them. I look forward to serving a school with the intellectual vitality and commitment not simply to contribute to the field but to continue transforming it.”“I am honored and excited by this opportunity, and grateful to Drew Faust for inviting me to take on this role at such a critical time in education and in the life of the School,” said James Ryan, seen here during a welcoming reception inside Gutman Library. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerA highly influential scholar at the crossroads of education, law, and policy, Ryan is currently the William L. Matheson and Robert M. Morgenthau Distinguished Professor of Law and the F. Palmer Weber Research Professor of Civil Liberties and Human Rights at the University of Virginia. He is also co-founder and director of the Program in Law and Public Service at the University of Virginia School of Law, where he served for five years as the academic associate dean. He was a member of the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission, which was charged with examining disparities in meaningful educational opportunities that give rise to the achievement gap, and with recommending ways that federal policies could address such disparities.Educational opportunity has been the predominant focus of Ryan’s most recent scholarship and teaching. His book “Five Miles Away, A World Apart: One City, Two Schools, and the Story of Educational Opportunity in Modern America” (Oxford University Press, 2010) explores questions of school segregation and inequality in the context of an urban school in Richmond, Va., and a nearby suburban school. He has written numerous articles for academic journals and other publications on such topics as school finance, school desegregation, school choice, school governance, a right to pre-school, teacher compensation reform, and the federal No Child Left Behind Act. He is also co-author of the casebook “Educational Policy and the Law” (2011).Ryan has been honored with both the University of Virginia’s All-University Teaching Award (2010) and with the Outstanding Faculty Award presented by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (2011). His courses have included offerings on law and education, comparative education law and policy, and schools, race, and law. He has lectured widely on a range of education policy matters.Ryan served on the board of the Maya Angelou Public Charter School in Washington, D.C. Previously, he served on the Century Foundation’s Task Force on the Common School and as vice chair of the American Bar Association’s Committee on Public Schools. He has also served as a pro bono consultant on numerous education-related legal and policy issues.He has received the U.Va. Law School’s McFarland Prize for Outstanding Scholarship, the Education Law Association’s Award for Distinguished Scholarship, and the U.Va. Black Law Students Association’s Outstanding Service Award.In addition to his scholarship and teaching on education law and policy, Ryan has taught and written about constitutional law, local government law, and Supreme Court litigation. He graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. from Yale in 1988, graduated first in his class from U.Va. Law School in 1992, and clerked for the late Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist of the U.S. Supreme Court. A former visiting professor of law at both Harvard and Yale, he was the inaugural Cameron Fellow at the University of Auckland in New Zealand.Ryan is married to Karoline (Katie) Homer Ryan, a clinical instructor at U.Va. who specializes in child advocacy and special education law. The couple has four children.In announcing the appointment, Faust expressed appreciation to “the many members of the HGSE community who have been so generous and thoughtful with advice on the dean search at a pivotal moment for the School. I especially thank the members of the faculty advisory committee for the search, whose lively discussions and candid counsel have done so much to shed light on the HGSE’s recent trajectory and future opportunities and to bring the search to an excellent conclusion.”last_img read more

Fans travel for international season opener

first_imgDUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said gameday in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame gameday until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”,DUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said game day in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame game day until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”last_img read more

Governor Kunin to receive prestigious Eleanor Roosevelt award

first_imgFormer governor Madeleine Kunin, currently a James Marsh Professor-at-Large at the University of Vermont, has been selected as one of three recipients of the 2009 Eleanor Roosevelt Val-Kill Medal award given annually to individuals and organizations who live the values espoused by the former first lady in her public life including human rights, social justice, and racial and gender equality.Gov. Kunin, former ambassador to Switzerland and the first woman in U.S. history to be re-elected governor three times, is being recognized for her “inspiring and energetic leadership and commitment to the principles that Mrs. Roosevelt championed for women, children and community,” according to Dana vanderHeyden, co-chair of the Medals Ceremony and ERVK board member. Gov. Kunin was cited for her efforts to improve the quality of education by creating early education programs for low-income children and for establishing state-wide kindergarten programs for all public schools.”Eleanor Roosevelt’s efforts to help those in need, to inspire the next generation, to encourage those in power and to be a ‘light in the darkness’ are reflected in the honorees this year,” said Marc vanderHeyden, co-chair of the Medals Ceremony, ERVK board member and former president of Saint Michael’s College. Kunin was also praised for her protecton of the environment by establishing programs to protect open spaces and farm land, which helped retain Vermont’s distinctive rural character.Past winners of the Eleanor Roosevelt Val-Kill Medal award include Hillary Clinton, Bill Moyers, Norman Vincent Peale, James Earl Jones, Christopher Reeve, Susan Sarandon, Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., Marian Wright Edelman, Fred Rogers, Kate Roosevelt Whitney, Harry Belafonte, Richard Holbrooke, Cherie Blair, Dorothy L. Height, Franklin A. Thomas, Barbara Jordan and others.Gov. Kunin, who served as deputy secretary of education under President Bill Clinton, served as Vermont’s only female governor from 1985 to 1991. She was appointed the first woman to the State Supreme Court and created the family court system. Gov. Kunin is author of two books: Pearls, Politics, and Power: How Women Can Win and Lead (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2008) and Living a Political Life (Vintage, 1995). The former UVM distinguished professor of political science remains active in her position as a James Marsh Professor-at-Large, giving lectures in 2009 on “Creating the Change We Believe In” and “Women, Power, and Politcis: How to Open the (Formerly) Smoke-Filled Room.”Other recipients of the 2009 Eleanor Roosevelt Val-Kill Medal include architect Jeh Johnson of East Fishkill, NY; former Chief Judge Judith Kaye of the State of New York; and The Anderson Center for Autism in Hyde Park, NY. They will be honored at the 23rd Annual ERKV Medal Ceremony at a noon luncheon on Sunday, Oct. 18 on the grounds of the the Eleanor Roosevelt Historic Site in Hyde Park. Tickets for the event cost $175. For more information, call (845) 229-5302 or (845) 876-6974 or visit the ERVK website3. Source: UVM. 10.12.2009                                                                                                 ###last_img read more

WATCH: Wildlife Biologist Encounters Tree Dwelling Black Bears

first_imgA wildlife biologist in Great Smoky Mountains National Park recently discovered a sow black bear and three of her cubs denning 50 feet off the ground inside the hollowed out cavity of an old growth buckeye tree. Ryan Williamson was able to locate the mother bear and her cubs via signals transmitted by her radio collar. When the radio signals led him to the base of the large buckeye he surmised that the mother bear and her cubs must be denning in the cavity, which is visible from the ground. But Williamson didn’t stop there. He then used an ascender to climb the tree and get a glimpse of the bears for himself. Luckily the encounter was documented by Williamson’s helmet-mounted GoPro, providing a rare glimpse into the lives of hibernating black bears. See for yourself below.[divider]Related Articles[/divider]last_img read more

ATM suppliers dish as Windows 7 deadline draws near

first_imgMicrosoft has released nearly a thousand security patches for its Windows 7-based operating system since the software giant made that its standard platform in 2009. The system drives millions of ATMs around the world, but on Jan. 14, 2020, Microsoft is ending standard support for the software. The move will affect billions of laptops, desktops, computer networks, and ATMs.Windows 10, which has been around since 2015, has become ubiquitous in PCs; however, major ATM providers estimate that 90% of the 190,000 or so ATMs in the United States are still on Windows 7. Here’s a look at what’s coming next, from the perspective of ATM manufacturers, a major systems outsourcer, and a consultant.To Migrate Or Not To Migrate?David McCrary is executive vice president for Cardtronics, a Texas-based provider of managed ATM services to more than 2,000 financial institutions worldwide, including 700 credit unions. He says credit unions do not have to migrate to Windows 10 and should consider the pros and cons from both the operational and cost perspective. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Year-to-date return at Keva climbs to 4.2% despite trimming risk

first_imgKeva, the €46.6bn pension fund covering local government staff across Finland, said its investments returned 4.2% in the first nine months of this year, up from the 1.9% generated in the same period last year, even though risks had since been been reined in.Timo Kietäväinen, the pension fund’s chief executive, said: “Keva’s investment performance has been good this year, especially as we have kept lowering the risk level of our investments significantly for more than a year now.”But he warned that the remainder of this year was overshadowed by uncertainty on the capital markets.The market value of investments grew to €46.6bn at the end of September from €43.1bn at the same point in 2015. Kietäväinen said that, compared with these short-term results, there was a much larger challenge at hand in safeguarding the longer-term funding of Keva’s pensions in the midst of the social and healthcare reform. “If a transitional contribution between the pension systems is not outlined as part of the social and healthcare reform’s freedom-of-choice principle, the odds for funding pensions with tax increases are high,” he said.If the long-term funding of the Finnish earnings-related pension system is to be sustainable, it is crucial that Finland be able to strengthen its competitiveness and increase employment, Kietäväinen said.Keva’s fixed income investments returned 5.7% in the first nine months of the year, while listed equities and equity funds returned 2.6%.Property, including real estate funds, made a 2.6% return, and private equity investments and unlisted equities generated an 8% return. Hedge funds, however, made no return over the period.Ari Huotari, the pension fund’s CIO, said that, so far, 2016 had been yet another exception to the norm, with interest rates falling to levels no one could have predicted. “The actions taken by the central banks and the lack of alternatives have bolstered higher-risk markets such as equities,” he said.Looking ahead to the rest of the year, he said the election results in Italy and the US had the potential to rock the markets in a big way.last_img read more