SMC security officials release crime statistics

first_imgCrime at Saint Mary’s College continued to stay low last year, according to an annual report released by the College’s security department Tuesday. “Crime statistics have remained consistently low on our campus over the years, with only slight fluctuations up and down in various categories,” David Gariepy, director of security, said. “When you have consistently low statistics, any fluctuation up or down may, by percentage, look significant. “The reality is that crime at Saint Mary’s College is very low.” The 2009 crime and fire statistical report included incidents of sexual assault, burglaries, alcohol and drug violations and fire. There were three incidents of sexual assault during 2009. Two of the assaults took place within the residence halls on campus, while the third took place on public property, according to the report. Of these sexual assaults, one was forcible rape, and the others were classified as forcible fondling. This marks a slight increase from previous years. The report stated that one sexual assault incident, which took place within a residence hall and was classified as forcible fondling, occurred in 2008. There were no sexual assaults in 2007. The report also stated that there were nine burglaries on campus, five of which took place within the resident halls, in 2009. There was one burglary in a non-campus building in 2008. There were four burglaries on campus, two of which were in residence halls, in 2007. Gariepy said students could help prevent crime by paying attention to their surroundings. He also encouraged students to make “safe choices in all activities,” which entails locking doors and vehicles, reporting suspicious or criminal activity and watching out for friends. The report also indicated 35 alcohol violations that led to referrals within the residence halls. An additional six incidents occurred on campus, but did not take place within the dormitories. There was only one alcohol related arrest located on public property in 2009. There was also one drug violation, which led to a referral within the residence halls. The College’s security department helps to prevent crime by patrolling campus 24 hours per day. It also provides safe transportation for students and monitors the security and fire systems regularly, Gariepy said. He also said the College attempts to improve safety on campus each year. This academic year, the Belles Against Violence Office was created to enhance campus security. Swipe card access was added to Angela Athletic Facility and security cameras were added to the Angela parking lot. Upgrades were also made to the fire system, he said. In 2009, there were not any incidents of the following: illegal weapons violations, drug arrests, motor vehicle theft, aggravated assault, robbery, criminal homicide and non-forcible sex offenses. “I believe Saint Mary’s College has historically been a safe campus, but I also know that bad things can and do happen in the safest of places,” Gariepy said. “It is important for us all to understand that dangerous incidents, both natural and manmade, can happen at any time.” Gariepy encouraged students to be familiar with the College’s “All Hazards” plan and to have a personal plan for survival if an emergency situation should arise. “Our best protection from harm is a mental alertness and preparedness,” he said. According to the fire statistical report, there was only one instance of fire in 2009. The fire took place in Holy Cross Hall on Dec. 4 and was classified as arson. To view the crime report visit http://www3.saintmarys.edu/campus-safety/crime-statistics. To view the fire report visit http://www3.saintmarys.edu/campus-safety/fire-equipment-fire-drill-matrix.last_img read more

Student injured in bike crash

first_imgA Notre Dame student received treatment at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center for injuries sustained in a bike accident on South Quad on Wednesday evening. The student crashed his bike at about 7 p.m. Wednesday near Howard Hall. Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and emergency technicians treated the student at the scene, and an ambulance transported him to the hospital shortly after the accident. The student’s rector said he is still disoriented from the crash but will recover from his injuries.last_img read more

Fans travel for international season opener

first_imgDUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said gameday in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame gameday until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”,DUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said game day in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame game day until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”last_img read more

Lecture explores Chile’s policies

first_imgFollowing the retrenchment of social policy under a period of turbulent military rule, Chile has endeavored to drastically reform its healthcare and pension systems, aiming to reduce poverty, inequality and provide a model for other nations seeking change. Rossana Castiglioni, head of the political science department at Chile’s Universidad Diego Portales, outlined this social policy journey during her Tuesday lecture, titled “Against All Odds: Social Policy Rollbacks in Democratic Chile.” Castiglioni said the democratically elected presidents of Chile in the 1990s, Patricio Aylwin and Eduardo Frei, inherited a system that split healthcare between public provision under Fonasa, a fund into which workers paid seven percent of their monthly income, and Isapre, a system of private healthcare providers.  For an additional premium, workers could buy into the private Isapre system in order to receive greater benefits and overall superior care. Castiglioni said this system generated enormous amounts of inequality, with private providers charging certain demographic groups discriminatory prices in the hope of driving high-risk individuals to seek Fonasa government insurance. “If you were a woman and you were at an age to have kids, they will charge you a lot,” Castiglioni said. “And if you are old, either pray or pay, because they will charge you a lot of money.” Castiglioni said Aylwin and Frei were content to preside over further expansion of the private sphere of the healthcare system disproportionately favoring the wealthy.  She said it was not until President Ricardo Lagos took office from 2000 to 2006 that efforts were made to address growing inequalities and bolster support for the nation’s vulnerable citizens. By introducing his AUGE plan, granting access to medical attention within a clear timetable to all patients who reach the inclusion criteria for one of 69 pathologies or medical conditions, Lagos implemented the greatest change to Chilean healthcare in 20 years, Castiglioni said. She said despite Lagos’ concerted effort to eliminate discrimination in the private health system, and despite a recent ruling of the Chilean Constitutional Tribunal declaring such discrimination “inadmissible,” the issue has not yet been resolved. “Lagos tried to tackle inequalities and discrimination, particularly in terms of age and sex, but the truth is that even though other parts of his reforms were approved discrimination still exists,” Castiglioni said. Following Lagos’ term, President Michelle Bachelet took up the banner of social policy after Lagos’ departure from office, putting together an advisory council to elaborate a pension reform proposal, Castiglioni said. The March 2008 law drawn up by this team of economists and sociologists stood as a capstone of Chilean social reform, introducing a “basic solidarity pillar” through which 40 percent of the poorest of the population, many of who had never contributed to the system, would be entitled to receive an old age pension or a disability pension of around 100 dollars. Although the recent changes in Chilean social policy have had a significant impact, Castiglioni said she ultimately does not feel they should be classified as structural reform. She blamed the lack of true structural reform on the dispersion of power, weakness of non-state actors and ideological distribution of the political system. These three factors are holding Chile back from taking more aggressive steps in reforming its system of social protection, Castiglioni said.last_img read more

Student Government announces new chief of staff

first_imgSenior Dan Sehlhorst stepped down from his position as chief of staff at Wednesday night’s student Senate meeting, and it was announced that student government secretary sophomore Sibonay Shewit has replaced Sehlhorst. Siboney Shewit, a sophomore and former student government secretary, has taken over the role of chief of staff from senior Daniel Sehlhorst.Senators had previously been informed of Sehlhorst’s decision to step down, but the announcement was formally made at the meeting. “It’s a result of a combination of personal things and family things that all converged at the same time,” he said. “It came to the point where I realized I would be in a better place, student government would be in a better place and all of you would be in a better place with someone who would probably be less distracted for the next semester, so I decided to change roles.”Sehlhorst said he will remain involved with student government during the semester.“I’ll still be around in an advisory role — I’ll be talking to Bryan [Ricketts, student body president] and Nidia [Ruelas, student body vice president] about my thoughts, strategies, next steps, that sort of thing,” Sehlhorst said. “That sort of management role, though, the kind of stuff that takes more time, will be better served with someone much more talented than myself.”Ricketts nominated Shewit to fill in as chief of staff for the remainder of the 2015-2016 student government administration. “Sib has served as Secretary this year, and proved to be an exemplary team member for Senate, Executive Cabinet and Campus Life Council,” Ricketts read from his nomination letter. “She has taken impeccable notes and promptly distributed them, benefiting both the Student Union and the entire student body by allowing us to function with transparent records.”Shewit also had a major role in launching Onward, the student government moderated online forum created to implement student-suggested initiatives, and in relaunching the student government website.“I am certain Bryan and Nidia will be well served with Sib at their side,” Selhlhorst said in an email.student government did not announce a replacement for Secretary at the meeting.Later in the meeting, sophomore Sullivan Curry was sworn in as the new student Senator for Morrissey Hall. Welsh Family Hall Senator Kathleen Flavin announced that the printing queue has been extended from six to twelve hours, an initiative that had been suggested from Onward.Tags: Chief of Staff, Onward, Student government, student senatelast_img read more

Artist explores racial injustice through monologues

first_imgAs part of the annual Margaret M. Hill Endowed Visiting Artist performance, Anna Deavere Smith gave a lecture and performance titled “From Rodney King to Michael Brown: The Narrative of Ferguson,” in which she performed monologues from her first play, “Twilight: Los Angeles,” and her most recent project on the school-to-prison pipeline — the practices that push at-risk youth out of schools and into the criminal justice system.Professor of Theatre Katie Sullivan introduced Smith. She said Smith was the first visiting artist when the endowment began in 2006, so it was appropriate to invite her back for the 10th anniversary, especially in light of recent racial tensions in America.“As we have watched our country struggle with racial division and inequality once again these last two years — from Ferguson to Baltimore, and Cleveland, and then Chicago — it seemed a good time to hear from [Smith] again,” Sullivan said. “She has the wonderful capacity to engage in conversations and ultimately to listen carefully to everyone as she carves out space for us to understand each other on complex and distressing national issues that involve us all politically, racially and culturally.”Smith said she travels around the country and interviews different people who were involved in or who witnessed different racial injustices.“My grandfather told me when I was a girl, ‘If you say a word often enough, it becomes,’” Smith said. “For the last many years, I’ve been going around America with a tape recorder trying to become America word for word by repeating what people say and putting myself in other people’s words, the way you would put yourself in someone else’s shoes.”Smith said the excerpts from her plays focused on law enforcement and education. She said she would perform pieces from her play from 1992 and from her most recent play to show how tensions have not necessarily changed over the years.“One of the things that plagues America from time to time is the relationship between law enforcement and individuals,” Smith said. “ … We also haven’t really gotten over the sort of chasm between social classes and races, which means some people are left outside of opportunity.”According to Smith, her first play focused on the riots that ensued after the killing of Rodney King by Los Angeles police officers was captured on film and spread worldwide. Similarly, her most recent play focuses on the riots that ensued after the killing of Freddie Gray by Baltimore police officers was captured with a smartphone camera and broadcasted to the world. Smith performed as Stanley Sheinbaum, Elaine Young, Cornel West, Keith Godfrey, Kevin Moore and Michael Tubbs — all people she had interviewed — to illustrate the experiences of people who have been pushed to the edges of society.“I want to look at this because it’s sort of remarkable that it keeps happening,” Smith said. “The question is: Are there things that we here in this room … can do in our own lives to keep things from happening?”She said her performances are not about the police officers, citing a speech by President Barack Obama in which he said fixing the problem does not start with trying to fix the officers.“This is really a problem of poverty,” Smith said. “It’s a problem of who is left behind. The cops in many ways are here for all of us — including me — to protect us against the possibility that those who are disenfranchised will harm us, our property or our loved ones. They are in the trenches to protect us, so we need to get it together and do something about this gap that we have.”Tags: Anna Deavere Smith, Ferguson, Margaret M. Hill Endowed Visiting Artist, race, Rodney Kinglast_img read more

College Republicans “support,” but do not endorse, Donald Trump

first_imgThe Notre Dame College Republicans announced Monday that the group would publicly support Donald Trump in his bid for President of the United States.Citing Trump’s opposition to abortion, his economic plan and his running mate selection, the club’s statement said Trump, despite his brash personality, “has a certain strength and a particular vision to see that these tasks are accomplished.” Rachel O’Grady | The Observer Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a rally in South Bend days before winning the Indiana primary in May.The announcement came after the club’s president, senior Pat Crane, told ABC News the club would be supporting the Republican nominee. Harvard University’s College Republicans and other GOP clubs had recently said they would not endorse Trump.But Crane said the Notre Dame College Republicans’ statement also did not constitute an “endorsement,” which he defined as agreeing with all of a candidate’s views. They instead chose to “support” Trump, acknowledging that not all members backed him or his views.“Endorsing would mean that we, as a total organization, are fully aligned with the candidate . . . Supporting means that we will provide any aid we can to the candidate, while the entire organization may not fully agree with the candidate,” Crane said.While the club’s officers wrote and released yesterday’s statement, vice president Dylan Stevenson said the officers and some members decided at a club meeting in April to support the as-yet-undecided Republican nominee.“We made a conscious decision as a club to support whoever that nominee was, and at the time it was uncertain as to who that might be,” Stevenson said. “But we made that conscious decision . . . so we kept that promise to our members in mind, and when we compared the policies of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, we came to the conclusion that we could very much keep that promise.”The Notre Dame College Democrats responded on Facebook today to the College Republicans’ statement, saying it was “unsurprising but nonetheless disappointing to see them embrace a wholly unqualified and dangerous presidential candidate.”The College Democrats had endorsed Hillary Clinton last month in conjunction with the College Democrats of Indiana. That group’s joint statement said Clinton “will fight to make progressive change a reality” and focused primarily on criticizing Trump and his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.Co-president Grace Watkins said the club had debated the issue during the spring semester, hearing from supporters of both Clinton and Bernie Sanders, but she and fellow co-president Andrew Galo, both seniors, made the decision to endorse Clinton when a consensus emerged over the summer. Watkins defined endorsement as publicly supporting and campaigning for a candidate.“I think that we made the decision to endorse because we felt we were strongly in favor of Hillary Clinton, and we also expect a public endorsement, along with the cycle itself, to drive participation up,” Watkins said.For both clubs, endorsing or supporting their party’s nominee means galvanizing support and encouraging members to become more involved in national and local campaigns this fall.“We’re focusing on programming on the messages of inclusivity and effecting change on the local and federal levels, so in practice that means connecting students to opportunities involving candidates including Hillary Clinton, as well as to local races.” Watkins said. “… In addition, we’re planning meetings for members to debate and present issues they’re interested in.”Stevenson said College Republicans would work on behalf of Trump, as well as in local races.“We plan on being involved in as many of those campaigns as possible and helping members get involved in the campaigns they care about. We understand that not everybody’s going to be on board with Donald Trump. … But we want to make sure that everybody at Notre Dame who cares about individual and economic liberty — there’s a place for them in the Republican Party.”Tags: College Democrats, College Republicans, Donald Trump, hillary clintonlast_img read more

Saint Mary’s launches Master of Autism Studies program

first_imgIn 2018, Saint Mary’s will introduce new graduate program, a Master of Autism Studies. Although students cannot begin their coursework until 2019, the program will begin accepting applications and hosting workshops this calendar year. “Everyone knows about the critical need for understanding and responding to autism in the world today,” Michael Waddell, program director, said in an email. “The Master of Autism Studies program responds to this need by examining autism from scientific, therapeutic and humanistic perspectives.”The first proposal for the program was submitted in the spring of 2011, Waddell said. This program speaks to the values of Saint Mary’s and specifically a Holy Cross education, said Susan Latham, a Master of Autism Studies faculty member and program director of the Master of Science in speech language pathology program.“I think it’s important that this is happening at Saint Mary’s because we are Holy Cross. And Holy Cross means that we are educating our students in a way that reflects the way that Fr. Moreau envisioned our work happening,” Latham said. “So for example, one characteristic of Holy Cross educators is respect for the individual in that we don’t concern ourselves with only the mind but also the heart, and that really speaks to our values and how we approach families with whom we work.” Waddell said that throughout their time in the program, students will study autism in relation to both intervention approaches as well as other subjects.“The Master of Autism Studies program will provide the interdisciplinary, autism-specific expertise students need to become leaders in autism-related fields,” he said. “Unlike other programs, the Master of Autism Studies will introduce students to the full range of evidence-based autism interventions, including — but not limited to — behavioralist approaches. And it will do all of these things in conversation with the Catholic tradition.”Waddell said the program looks beyond just the science and examines the intersection of autism with the humanities.“Autism therapies are important because, when done well, they can improve the quality of life of people who live with autism,” he said. “And, of course, in order to provide the best autism therapies, you have to understand the science of autism. But autism is about more than a diagnosis and treatment.  It affects every dimension of life. That’s why it’s important to think about autism from humanistic perspectives too.”In these humanities courses, students will study autistic art and literature, as well as take into account how philosophical, theological, political and legal lenses can aid in the understanding of autism, Waddell said. “The humanities courses in the autism studies program help us to think about autism as more than a diagnosis and treatment — to understand that autism shapes the lives and identities of human beings and is giving rise to a distinctive culture,” he said. “This is the only program I know of that takes such a broad approach to thinking about autism as part of the human experience.”This specific approach is unique to Saint Mary’s. Most other programs across the nation look solely at the scientific aspects, and the holistic approach taken in this program is “visionary,” Latham said.“There aren’t other programs like this,” she added. “This is sort of groundbreaking, in having this degree being offered. It’s nice to know that right here, on this campus, we are creating something and are really passionate about something that I feel is visionary, that is not what everybody is doing.”The program brings together faculty and faculty fellows who are experts in various aspects of autism studies, Waddell said. “Every person teaching in the program has a significant interest in autism and brings a special kind of expertise to the table,” he said. “In my personal opinion, the quality of the faculty and fellows is one of the greatest strengths of the program. I want to take every course my colleagues will be teaching.”On March 2, the program will host its first workshop. Waddell said workshops will be focused on intervention techniques, sometimes offering an opportunity for certification.“The autism intervention workshops bring world-renowned experts to campus to provide training in state-of-the-art autism interventions,” he said. “… We strive to represent the full range of evidence-based interventions rather than just limiting ourselves to one particular approach, as happens in many programs.”Waddell said that many of the workshops offer students and community members the opportunity to achieve valuable certification in intervention methods at little to no cost. The upcoming one will be cosponsored by the Master of Autism Studies program, the Communicative Sciences and Disorders department and LOGAN Community Resources. It is free and open to all, as long as participants register online prior to the workshop. “This is the sort of thing that students can list on resumes and professionals can use to maintain licensure,” Waddell said. “The training would cost a lot of money for students and community members if they pursued it on their own, but it’s being offered for free in our workshops through the financial support of sponsors.”Latham looks forward to sharing her passion for autism studies to both the community through workshops and through teaching, she said. “It’s really encouraging to me to know that there are people that think that there is value in this as a graduate study and that they have that same level of compassion and concern for individuals on the autism spectrum,” she said. Tags: Autism, Holy Cross, Master of Autism Studieslast_img read more

New location in Duncan Student Center allows career services to expand

first_imgIn addition to the numerous dining options, improved workout facilities and expanded study space in the new Duncan Student Center, the building also houses the Center for Career Development on the fifth floor. Previously located on the first two floors of Flanner Hall, the Department for Career Services is now centrally located on campus and easily accessible for students. Vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding cited the Career Center’s new location along with many other aspects of student life as one of the biggest advantages of the new student center.“To have the Career Center and the Center for Career Development right upstairs rather than across campus … bringing together all of these different elements, for us, is part of the exciting piece to things that had previously really been scattered across campus,” she said in an interview Jan. 15.Julie Gray, associate director of career operations, said the move has allowed the department to operate more effectively due to the increased amount of space available to it.“In the past, especially during the fall semester, we would often have to kick staff out of the second floor offices because there simply wasn’t enough room,” Gray said. With 36 interview rooms, 11 conference rooms that can hold up to 16 people and one training room that holds about 60 people, there is ample room for the next wave of recruitment in the new location, Gray said.The Career Center also houses eight virtual interview rooms along the east wall that feature Zoom technology. Gray said employers would often come to campus with a full slate of interviews but still miss out on a qualified candidate. These new interview spaces, she said, will enable them to also network with students abroad in the same trip to Notre Dame’s campus. Hoffmann Harding said the improved technology came as a result of student feedback during the planning process of the Duncan Student Center.“The types of interviews that students are now getting from employers — so the increased need for technology and the ability to Skype or talk remotely to employers [came from students],” she said. “And actually, during peak study times, the addition of the need for study space. So we’ve designed the fifth floor in a way that the offices can be separable from the interview center, which can be open during peak times for student study space. And that’s new, that’s different and it’s accessible because now it’s in a building that students frequent — we hope — during the day and even into the evening.”This newly-available space, Gray said, highlights the purpose of the Center for Career Development as well as the Duncan Student Center.“This is a student center, and we want this to be student-focused,” she said. “These next few months, we’ll be working [to] optimize this space and hopefully create a better environment for students and employers.”Gray said the new centralized space has also allowed the department to integrate the various stages of education and career building, as the undergraduate, graduate and Mendoza graduate students are “all under student affairs.” This integrated method, she said, is largely due to an initiative the department took on several years ago to shift the emphasis on students’ approaches to career searches from major onto industry. “We have career counselors that are liaisons to each of the different colleges,” Gray said. “It doesn’t matter what your major is, it doesn’t dictate what you do. We try to focus on a student’s passions and strengths and how we can translate those into the workforce.”News Editor Courtney Becker contributed to this story.Tags: Career Center, Center for Career and Development, duncan student center, Notre Dame Career Centerlast_img read more

University names valedictorian, salutatorian for 2019 commencement ceremonies

first_imgSeniors Sofia Carozza and Annelise Gill-Wiehl will be valedictorian and salutatorian of the 2019 Notre Dame graduating class, respectively, the University announced in a press release Wednesday.The two were chosen following an application process that invites the top three students of each school in the University with the highest grade point average to submit faculty recommendations and a draft of their commencement speech. The press release said a selection committee chose the finalists who were then approved by University President Fr. John Jenkins.A native of South Bend and a graduate of Saint Joseph High School, Carozza is a neuroscience and behavior major with a supplemental major in theology as well as a minor in philosophy, politics and economics. Carrying a 4.0 grade point average, Carozza is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar and a de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture Sorin Fellow, the press release said.Over the course of her time at Notre Dame, Carozza has been involved with the Institute for Advanced Study, ND Students for Worker Justice, Show Some Skin and Baraka Bouts, the press release said. The statement said Carozza is fluent in Italian, conversational in Spanish and is a classically trained harpist. She was named a recipient of the Marshall Scholarship in December, which will allow her pursue a master of philosophy in basic and translational neuroscience and eventually a doctorate at the University of Cambridge in England.In the community, Carozza is also a mental health coach for at-risk youth and is involved with heading an exercise program at the St. Joseph County Juvenile Justice Center. During her summers, she has tutored disabled children in Paraguay at the National Institute for International Studies at Notre Dame, conducted neuroscience research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and studied toxic stress at the ChildWise Institute in Montana.Hailing from St. Louis, Gill-Wiehl is an environmental engineering major with a minor in international development studies. A member of the Chi Epsilon civil engineering honor society and Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society, Gill-Wiehl has performed research at the University through the Kellogg Institute and the Atmospheric Chemistry and Aerosol Modeling Group on topics such as environmental sustainability and infrastructure, the release said.On campus, Gill-Wiehl is involved with Kellogg Institute International Scholars, NDSEED and student government, in addition to serving as co-president of GlobeMed. She is also a member of both the Chi Epsilon civil engineering honor society and the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. She is also conversational in Swahili.Gill-Wiehl has been recognized for work at Notre Dame in the past with the Rev. Thomas A. Steiner Award in the College of Engineering for excellence and commitment to engineering and to the common good as well as the John W. Gardner Student Leadership Award for exemplifying the ideals of the University through outstanding volunteer service beyond campus, the release said. Gill-Wiehl plans to attend the University of California, Berkeley to pursue a doctorate in energy resources.Tags: 2019 Commencement, 2019 salutatorian, 2019 valedictorian, salutatorian, valedictorianlast_img read more