Refurbished Santa Cruz Fire Station Re-Opens

first_imgThe 32 fire personnel attached to the Santa Cruz Fire Station in St. Elizabeth are now serving the public from more comfortable and modern facilities. The fire station was recently refurbished at a cost of $14.7 million, through funding provided by the Ministry of Local Government and Community Development, with contributions from other public and private sources. Addressing the re-dedication ceremony for the building on Thursday, Acting Deputy Superintendent in charge of the fire station, Andrew Russell, informed that the upgrading, which started in January of this year, was carried out within budget. He said the scope of the project included demolition and removal of the existing timber roof, windows and doors; construction of new officers dormitory; expansion of existing kitchen space; building of reinforced concrete slab roof; repainting of the station building; complete rewiring of electrical network; and installation of new floor tiles, windows and doors, and plumbing fixtures. He said the work done was “the culmination of an important and eagerly awaited project, which will enrich the lives of the firefighters based there, boost their morale, enhance the delivery of service to the wider community and add value to the Jamaica Fire Brigade’s assets”. Minister of State for Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Colin Fagan, in his address at the ceremony, said it is appropriate that the refurbished facility is being opened during Local Government Month. He congratulated the firefighters for taking the initiative to start some of the work themselves, which he said, served as an inspiration for other  stakeholders to support the project. “While funding was largely provided by the Ministry, through the St. Elizabeth Parish Council, I must acknowledge the input of those who partnered with us.  This kind of partnership is a practical demonstration of our theme for Local Government and Community Development Month – Local Government on a mission together: Building better communities, he said. He gave a commitment that the Ministry “will do everything” to see to the completion of other necessary elements, such as security and landscaping, and urged the firefighters to take care of the facility.last_img read more

New Viola Desmond bank note shines spotlight on Halifaxs historic north end

first_imgHALIFAX – The new Canadian bank note honouring Viola Desmond had a satisfying surprise for many African-Nova Scotians: an unexpected shout-out to Halifax’s historic north end, home to one of Canada’s oldest black communities.“I’m ecstatic about it,” said Irvine Carvery, a prominent north ender who was thrilled to discover when the $10 bill was unveiled last week that it included a map of the community he has lived in his whole life.“I just think it’s a wonderful way to advertise the north end and the people that live in the north end.”The bill cements Desmond’s status as a civil rights icon for her refusal to leave the whites-only section of a movie theatre while visiting New Glasgow, N.S., in 1946.But behind her portrait, the bank note features a historic map of Halifax’s north end that pays tribute to another aspect of her pioneering legacy — her community and her entrepreneurship.The map includes the stretch of Gottingen Street, the north end’s main drag, where the beautician opened a salon as part of a business that would eventually expand into her own line of cosmetics and a beauty school, which allowed her to mentor black women from across the country.“This historic community in Halifax was where Viola Desmond lived and worked, and served as a source of invaluable support during her struggle for justice,” the Bank of Canada says in its materials on the new bank note.“This artistic rendering of a historic map shows the waterfront, Citadel and Gottingen Street, the thoroughfare where Vi’s Studio of Beauty Culture was located.”Sylvia Parris, CEO of the Delmore Buddy Daye Learning Institute, which advocates for education issues affecting African-Nova Scotians, said Desmond’s story is emblematic of the historic Halifax community’s strength, resiliency and self-sufficiency.“I think this is actually a way for the (north end) … to be seen as having its kind of own identity,” said Parris.“When people are looking at the money and kind of having a conversation … they can start to look more deeply into north-end Halifax and learn more about the community.”The north end was home to Africville, which was founded in the 1800s with many residents former slaves and black Loyalists. But residents were forced to relocate when the community was ordered razed by Halifax council in the late 1960s, and many moved into public housing elsewhere in the north end.Historically, the north end has been populated by black-owned businesses, Carvery said, but many of them shut down in the wake of the civil rights movement that Desmond helped spur as an unintended consequence of desegregation.“I would hope that (the bill) is going to inspire … young black entrepreneurs to take a look at that whole history of black business ownership and inspire them,” said Carvery, 65, a former chair of Halifax’s school board.He said the black community’s entrepreneurial history has particular resonance as the north end reckons with the forces of gentrification, which have transformed the neighbourhood in recent years with an influx of new business owners.The commercial shift has led some to call on new stores to hire longtime north-end residents, but Carvery said he hopes African-Nova Scotians will take after Desmond and start their own businesses so they can employ other members of the community.“I think (Desmond’s story) harkens back to a Gottingen Street that we’d all like to see again,” said Patty Cuttell-Busby, executive director of the North End Business Association. “One where there is lots of diversity in the businesses that are owned in the area.”Cuttell-Busby said she hopes Desmond’s role as a national ambassador for the north end will be a boon to businesses in the area, while also inspiring the next generation of black owners.But in addition to the bill’s empowering message, Carvery — who was among those forced to relocate from Africville — said he sees the monetary spotlight on the north end as a rebuke to a city that has long neglected the district, and at times, mistreated its black residents.The city offered a formal apology for Africville in 2010 as part of a multi-million-dollar settlement with former residents, but Carvery said the forced displacement still casts a long shadow over the black community’s relationship with municipal government.“For the north end to end up on the $10 bill is kind of like, ‘In your face,’” he said.last_img read more

Its not us who are creating climate change Canada Arctic council president

first_imgKent DriscollAPTN News Despite climate change being a reality in the north, America’s circumpolar neighbours are finding out just how far the Trump Administration will go to avoid saying those words.Last week, the council did not release a joint declaration at the end of their bi-annual meeting last week because the U.S. wouldn’t sign on to anything that included the words climate change.This is on message for Trump’s administration.In 2017 the U.S. withdrew from the Paris Climate Change Accord, which was signed by 200 other countries including Canada.“Usually at the end of this, there is a declaration, where all the members agree to a declaration which would be (non) binding, on the work that will be done in the next two years,” said Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada President Monica Ell-Kanayuk.“Unfortunately, the United States did not want any wording whatsoever with the words climate change. That led to the declaration not being developed.”(Amazing the difference three years can make. Above, is a stretch of road photographed in May 2016. Below is the same road, photographed in May 2019. Those large snowbanks are no longer there. May brought a single day record high temperature for the month of May to Iqaluit. Photos: Kent Driscoll/APTN)Ell-Kanayuk, an Iqaluit resident, says she sees climate change first hand in her community.A combination of warm weather and low snowfall over the winter has left snowmobiles landlocked earlier than ever.Iqaluit city council has approved pumping drinking water from a nearby river into the city reservoir, because not enough ice will be melting into the reservoir this year.(Kids playing outside in Nunavut is not unusual but kids playing basketball outdoors in May without having to shovel off the court is very unusual. The kids here outside of the Nakasuk School in Iqaluit are getting their game on early, due to unseasonable warm weather. Photo: Kent Driscoll/APTN)Here in Iqaluit, climate change is an everyday problem.“It’s a reality,” said Ell-Kanayuk. “The climate is changing. We see it most up here. We are the ones first hand experiencing climate change, and it is not us who are creating the climate change.”(This is the view from the breakwater in Frobisher Bay. There may be some choppy ice left in the bay, but look behind. Those hills are usually snow covered this time of year. Photo: Kent Driscoll/APTN)The American stance not only defies her reality, it could lead to an important precedent, politicizing the usually apolitical council.“The fear is that other countries might also decide that this is something that they don’t need to deal with,” said Ell-Kanayuk.A veteran of the Nunavut Legislative Assembly, Ell-Kanayuk does see a political solution to this vexing American stance.“I hope this is just a bump in the road. The elections are forth coming, we don’t know what the outcome will be, and until then, we don’t know how they’ll change dealing with their issues in the future,” she said.(In Nunavut, the snow is like the road and snowmobiles are the cars. Unseasonable weather has left there sleds landlocked, meaning the hunters who use them will not be bringing home affordable food to their families. Photo: Kent Driscoll/APTN)The next Arctic Council meeting is in Iceland in 2021.Inuit Circumpolar Council was founded in 1977 and represents 160,000 Inuit living in Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia.Its goal is to represent the combined interests of Inuit on a global stage.Each of the four Inuit regions have two members chosen by their local Inuit organizations. As a part of their work, they sit as permanent members of the Arctic Council.The current Canadian President of ICC is Monica [email protected]@kentdriscolllast_img read more

Roy Halladay Was The Greatest Pitcher Of His Generation

9Felix Hernandez52.4251 The Doc was the greatest pitcher of this millenniumPitcher wins above replacement since 2000 Sources: The Baseball Gauge, Baseball-Reference.com 8Cole Hamels54.0160 5Roger Clemens57Curt Schilling26James Shields18 3Jack McDowell61Randy Johnson32Felix Hernandez18 4Clayton Kershaw59.4253 RKPITCHERCGPITCHERCGPITCHERCG 1Roy Halladay61.7652 5Mark Buehrle58.5330 RANKPLAYERWARCOMPLETE GAMESCY YOUNG AWARDS Yesterday’s news that the great pitcher Roy Halladay had died in a plane crash sent baseball’s fraternity of players and coaches into a state of deep mourning. Around the league, tributes to Halladay’s technical skill and work ethic poured in. As our former colleague Ben Lindbergh wrote at The Ringer, Halladay was the consummate pitcher’s pitcher — the guy other pitchers always wanted to be.But on a personal level, the reports hit me especially hard — I grew up a fan of the Toronto Blue Jays, the team for whom Halladay first made his name as an ace. I was too young to experience the back-to-back World Series titles of 1992 and 1993, so my earliest memories came of the Blue Jays teams that stunk it up in the first decade of this millennium. Halladay was the one bright spot on an otherwise mediocre Toronto squad, so it was fitting that late Blue Jays game-caller Tom Cheek gave him the nickname “Doc” — a reference, of course, to Doc Holliday. But Halladay truly was a doctor on the mound — he healed so many of his team’s ills whenever he got the nod as that day’s starter.1As Jayson Stark pointed out, in games that Halladay started between 2002 and 2011 (his prime), his team went 195-108. When someone else started, his teams went 646-670.In his 12 seasons with Toronto, Doc pitched more than 2,000 innings and won 148 games, plus received the AL Cy Young award in 2003. He pitched 10 innings in a single game not once, but twice. Alongside Dave Stieb, Halladay is widely considered the greatest pitcher in Blue Jays history. When he was traded to the Phillies in 2009, my fellow Blue Jays fans were understandably upset, but they also understood. In his four seasons in Philadelphia, Doc’s stature grew to a whole new level. In typical fashion, he wasted no time, throwing a no-hitter in his postseason debut (just months after he pitched just the second perfect game in Phillies history). On the way, Doc won an NL Cy Young award — he’s one of just six pitchers in MLB history to win the award in both leagues.Because he spent years on a scuffling Toronto team, Doc’s greatness often gets overlooked. But it shouldn’t be. Based on total pitching wins above replacement since 2000, nobody this millennium has surpassed him yet, even though he hasn’t pitched in four years. 2Randy Johnson65Livan Hernandez36Adam Wainwright19 4Kevin Brown58CC Sabathia28Roy Halladay18 10Johan Santana51.4152 6Curt Schilling57Mark Mulder25Johnny Cueto17 8Chuck Finley46Javier Vazquez23Cliff Lee16 6Justin Verlander56.6231 1Greg Maddux75Roy Halladay47Clayton Kershaw25 10Doug Drabek41Sidney Ponson23Ervin Santana16 Halladay was a bridge between pitching erasMost complete games by decade in MLB, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s 7Tim Hudson54.8250 After this period of mourning for Halladay, writers and analysts will inevitably turn their attention to his Hall of Fame chances. And according to the yardsticks that we statheads typically look at, Halladay might seem like a borderline case. Because he had fewer dominant years than Hall of Fame voters like to see — he had injury problems early in his career and then retired relatively young — Halladay’s résumé is slightly below the HOF average for starting pitchers.2Based on JAWS, a WAR-based measure that tries to evaluate a player relative to his peers at the same position by balancing career and peak value. And although he meets the Hall’s criteria on other measures such as Bill James’s Black Ink Test (which tracks how often a player leads the league in important statistical categories), he falls short on some of the big statistical benchmarks that typically mark a HOF career.However, Halladay’s accomplishments are being sold short by these kinds of evaluations. His career stretched across two major eras of pitching, from a time when starters were often asked to finish games (no matter how many pitches it took) to the modern game, where bullpens are taking over for starters earlier and earlier. Halladay helped build a bridge between those two styles of starting pitching — as mentioned above, he could (and often did) go the distance and then some, recording complete-game totals that would have been commonplace in the 1980s and ’90s, but that stood out compared with his peers in the 2000s and even the 2010s, a decade in which he only pitched three full seasons. 1990s2000s2010s 2CC Sabathia61.5381 3Zack Greinke60.7161 9John Smoltz42Bartolo Colon23David Price16 7Scott Erickson47Mark Buehrle24Justin Verlander17 Source: FanGraphs Yet he was also a thoroughly modern pitcher, dominating with strikeouts and pinpoint control, a technician in addition to a workhorse. Since 2000, his fielding-independent pitching (relative to the league) is right up there with today’s aces such as Clayton Kershaw, Chris Sale and Corey Kluber. Since many of the metrics most commonly used to judge Hall of Fame standards were built with pitchers of a different era in mind, the metrics might need to be adjusted to better reflect what’s valued in today’s best hurlers. And Halladay might serve as a great test case, since he (more than maybe anyone else) helped the game transition between those eras of pitching.Whether Doc makes it to the Hall of Fame is irrelevant right now, though. What matters right now is that every time Halladay took to the mound, people were watching. Regardless of whether you were a pitcher or a hitter growing up, you wanted to be like Doc.— Neil Paine contributed research.CORRECTION (Nov. 8, 2017, 11:30 a.m.): A previous version of the first table in this article incorrectly showed Tim Hudson as having 26 complete games since 2000. He had 25. read more

Congressman Hunter The Green New Deal is the Old Socialist Steal

first_img March 8, 2019 KUSI Newsroom SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Congressman Duncan D. Hunter wrote an op-ed about the Green New Deal. He published it on his website, but you can read it below:“America was founded on liberty and independence – not government coercion, domination, and control. We are born free, and we will stay free. Tonight, we renew our resolve that America will never be a socialist country.”That was President Trump’s declaration during his recent State of the Union address. The need for such an obvious statement would have been unfathomable a few years ago. Aside from Bernie Sanders, there were not many Members of Congress who would openly describe themselves or their policies as socialist in nature. Times have changed. The socialist label has become a badge of honor for today’s liberals and, apparently, a prerequisite for any Democrat who is considering a run for the White House. In this environment, President Trump’s declaration was necessary and, I believe, will go down as a defining moment of his presidency.Case in point, the Green New Deal (GND), a proposal to radically transform our economy and impose expensive government mandates on the American people. This policy has inexplicably become the rallying cry of liberal Democrats. From hard-charging newly elected representatives to presidential hopefuls racing to raise money, liberal Democrats have gone all in on new legislative efforts that seek to eliminate all greenhouse gas emissions from every sector of the economy within 10 years. Under the GND plan, 100% of all power demands will be provided through clean and renewable energy sources.While this sounds worthwhile, in reality, what would such an effort actually entail? All industries would be under the knife. From methane-producing cows, to cars and planes. From traditional fossil fuels to clean-burning liquid natural gas. Even nuclear power plants that produce tremendous amounts of reliable, CO2 free energy would not escape this overzealous mandate.Every building will have to be upgraded or replaced (yes, replaced!) to achieve full compliance. Our transportation system would be totally overhauled by huge increases in electric vehicle production and air travel will be supplanted by a tremendous expansion of high-speed rail (insert California high-speed rail joke here.)How do supporters of the GND propose to eliminate all these power sources and convince the private sector to support such an effort? Incentives? No, the GND approach is the same as any socialist endeavor—the government becomes the prime economic driver, creating massive bureaucratic regulation and taking draconian punitive actions against American citizens and private businesses that do not achieve the coordinated response and complete transition from fossil fuels.What is the cost of the GND? Beginning estimates start at $6.6 trillion per year, but realistic expectations have the cost much higher. This coming from the same group who claimed a $5 billion investment into our border security was too much. Who is going to pay that cost? Working Americans, through higher taxes and expensive government mandates. Our choices – gone. Our desires – irrelevant. Our quality of life – inconsequential. The only thing required to put this plan into place, our pocketbooks and our silence. Well, they will get neither.Before considering such a massive overhaul of our economy, we need to take a step back into reality. Right now, the U.S. is a world leader in reducing carbon dioxide emissions. To imply different is a disservice to the accomplishments we have achieved. We should always strive to be better stewards of our environment, to breathe clean air, to drink clean water, to preserve America’s natural resources for generations to come. The socialist left would have us believe that this objective is completely inconsistent with energy production, but they are wrong, these are not mutually exclusive goals. The federal government continues to make investments in green technology research and private companies, fueled by a free market and competition, are making great strides in manufacturing cleaner cars, safer buildings, and more efficient power plants.GND advocates will argue they want a “democratic and participatory process,” that their proposal is only a House Resolution, without the force of law, an expression of Congress with which to start a dialogue and conversation. Any such conversation, however, must start with truth. The truth is America did not get where it is through top down government mandates that kill the innovative spark that fuels small business and defines the very nature of our energetic and expanding economy. America got to where it is through the ingenuity and tenacity of the American people, empowered by the freedoms enshrined in our constitution. The stark reality is that the massive economic overhaul that the GND requires would be a march towards socialism.The Green New Deal is the old, tired Socialist Steal, a plan that has the government picking winners and losers. A plan that deserves to be rejected. A more productive conversation and dialogue is finding ways to encourage the private sector and free market in innovative energy science to do what it does best, invest in America.Congressman Duncan Hunter represents the 50th Congressional District of California. Posted: March 8, 2019 Congressman Hunter: The Green New Deal is the Old Socialist Steal By Congressman Duncan D. Hunter KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News, Politics FacebookTwitterlast_img read more