Hahn & Hahn Bolsters Corporate Team

first_img Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS 81 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Kevin M. O’SullivanSouthern California-based law firm Hahn & Hahn LLP announced today that seasoned corporate attorney Kevin M. O’Sullivan has joined the firm’s Business Department.“As the complexities of the marketplace continue to grow for our business clients, we continue to expand to meet their needs,” said Managing Partner Christianne Kerns. “Kevin’s deep experience will be a tremendous resource to our clients.”O’Sullivan represents business entities in all aspects of corporate and business law, including mergers and acquisitions, venture capital financing, public and private placements of securities, and securities regulation. He has represented companies in various industries in the structuring, negotiating, and drafting of corporate transaction documents.“Hahn & Hahn has a strong reputation in Southern California, and I am looking forward to working with an exceptional team of lawyers and professionals,” said O’Sullivan.O’Sullivan earned his bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley and JD from the University of Michigan Law School. A native Angeleno, O’Sullivan started his career practicing corporate law with Paul Hastings LLP in downtown Los Angeles, where he spent nearly eight years. Most recently, O’Sullivan served in the role of associate general counsel with TeamHealth, a national healthcare company, out of its Los Angeles office, a position that he held for the past five and half years.Hahn & Hahn LLP has been an active member of the Southern California business and legal communities since 1899. For more information visit https://www.hahnlawyers.com/ Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Hahn & Hahn Bolsters Corporate Team STAFF REPORT Published on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | 11:38 am Business News Community News Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Darrel Done BusinessVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimescenter_img More Cool Stuff CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday HerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop 9 Predicted Haircut Trends Of 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Secrets That Eastern Women Swear By To Stay Young LongerHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeauty STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Branden Jacobs-Jenkins Awarded ‘Genius’ Grant

first_img View Comments Playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins has been awarded a 2016 “Genius” Grant from the MacArthur Foundation. He and this year’s 22 other recipients will receive a no-strings-attached $625,000 grant for potential future contributions in their respective fields.Jacobs-Jenkins’ Gloria, which premiered last year at off-Broadway’s Vineyard Theatre, was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for drama. After his first play in 2010, Neighbors, he received the Helen Merrill Award in Playwriting and the Vineyard’s Paula Vogel Award. His additional works include Appropriate, An Octoroon and War. He is currently a Residency Five playwright through Signature Theatre.Among the additional members of the MacArthur Fellows Program’s Class of 2016 are theater artist and educator Anne Basting and composer Julia Wolfe. Last year’s recipients included Lin-Manuel Miranda, puppet designer Basil Twist and and set designer Mimi Lien. Branden Jacobs-Jenkins(Photo: Gregory Costanzo)last_img read more

Speaker Smith ultimatum to lawmakers: Stick with the program

first_imgby Anne Galloway on March 11, 2011 vtdigger.org Whether you’re talking about your household checking account or the state General Fund, the math can be boiled down to a simple subtraction problem: revenues ‘ expenses = X.In good years X equals surpluses; for the last four years, that X has been a negative number in the many millions at the beginning of the state budgeting process. This year the figure in red represents 12 percent of the state’s budget, or about $176 million. In this legislative session, there is no Uncle Sam at the ready to bail out states with fistfuls of ready cash. In fact, the old man may have empty pockets next year and leave us with a new deficit problem caused by significant reductions in programs like the Low-Income Heating Assistance Program (that federal cut would amount to $14 million if it goes through).In order to resolve this year’s budget gap, Gov. Peter Shumlin has proposed an austere budget that would cut $43.8 million from the Agency of Human Services and raise $30 million in new taxes on medical providers. He has refused to consider using budget stabilization funds (rainy day money) or raising ‘broad-based’ taxes, i.e. income taxes, to soften the blow to programs for the elderly, developmentally disabled and mentally ill.Despite public pressure and internal rumblings in the General Assembly, it appears that Sen. John Campbell, president pro tem of the Senate, and House Speaker Shap Smith have locked arms with the governor on the no new taxes pledge. When Campbell and Smith stood in front of 1,000 people who gathered in front of the Statehouse to protest the human services cuts on Wednesday, neither leader offered much comfort in the way of promises to restore the cuts. Smith, for example, told the activists he wouldn’t make promises he couldn’t keep.Several Progressive members of the General Assembly meanwhile are pressing for taxes on the wealthy to ameliorate the worst of the reductions in state spending. The Democratic leadership, however, is doggedly singing the familiar refrain: ‘We can’t tax our way out of this.’It was in this light that Speaker Smith issued an ultimatum to the House Ways and Means Committee on Thursday: Stick with the program.Smith made an appearance in front of the committee to reinforce party discipline. He asked lawmakers to accept the governor’s budget, as is, and to refrain from the temptation to raise income taxes or place a levy on sugar-sweetened beverages.He argued that the governor’s budget already raises a significant amount of revenue ‘ $30 million in new health care provider taxes.‘The budget does not balance if we do not have $30 million in new revenues,’ Smith said. ‘The scope of what the governor has proposed is a good direction to go in.’The speaker then ticked off a list of talked-about taxation options he said ‘I think we should avoid.’ At the top? A sugar-sweetened beverage tax. ‘It’s not that I don’t believe it’s appropriate at some point and time,’ Smith said. He told the committee it would make more sense to levy a tax on soda as part of a health care package at some point as a way to incentivize healthy behaviors. ‘Sin taxes’ shape behavior, in his view, and they are ‘not the best way to generate stable revenue.’The speaker took care to say he ‘broadly’ supports the Vermont Blue Ribbon Tax Structure Commission report, but he hoped legislators ‘would not confuse’ that with the capacity to raise taxes. While he didn’t foreclose on the possibility that taxes could be increased, he strongly urged lawmakers to refrain from using the restructuring of the tax code as a vehicle for raising taxes.Smith said the commission’s recommendations were revenue neutral (they didn’t raise more in taxes), and he wants House Ways and Means to keep it that way.‘We ought to be cautious about moving away from that framework,’ Smith said. ‘We may need a new framework in the future.’The dirty little secret, Smith said, is ‘we can’t raise that much money in income taxes’ (for fiscal year 2012) unless the state retroactively applies the rates. Anne Galloway is editor of vtdigger.org (www.vtdigger.org(link is external))last_img read more

Governor Wolf Leads Call-to-Action for Criminal Justice Reform

first_imgJustice Reinvestment Initiatives (JRI2), which seek to provide for fair sentencing, increase parole supervision and use of community-based programs, among other reforms.Bail and Pre-Trial Reforms to ensure that everyone has a right to a fair trial and that risk-assessment tools are consistent across the commonwealth.Post-Conviction Relief Act Expansion to reduce time sensitivity by increasing awareness of when rights expire so defendants can make an informed plea decision. Currently if a defendant pleads guilty, they are foreclosed from post-conviction relief; this needs to change so all defendants, regardless of plea, may attempt to prove their innocence.Probation/Parole Revocation and Resentencing to create uniformity in probation revocation procedures and ensure a correlation between risk and probation lengths, resulting in better supervision.Comprehensive Clean Slate Legislation currently being considered in the General Assembly and the first step in establishing a much more comprehensive clean slate law in the commonwealth to provide an opportunity for persons convicted of greater offenses, including felony convictions, to reenter the community with success.Indigent Defense is a critical part of the system that can have a large impact on volume, cost, and human effects and is needed in Pennsylvania to ensure the independence and quality of counsel under the Sixth Amendment.Stepping Up Initiative, which was launched statewide in April 2017 and via summit in December 2017 along with a data-driven project by Dauphin County to examine its criminal justice system, with the goal of reducing the number of people who have serious mental illnesses in the county prison. The findings from that project will be made public at the end of this month and will be used to develop policy and programming recommendations. “Leadership matters. When it comes to reforming our criminal justice system Philadelphia, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and our nation are looking to us to lead the path towards justice and fairness. We need to advocate for sound, consistent polices that do not waste time, money and resources, keep residents in our neighborhoods safe and promote fairness and equity for everyone in the criminal justice system. We know there is a direct connection between criminal justice reform and reducing poverty. Reforming our criminal justice system will not be easy and is not something that will happen overnight; but when we work together in a thoughtful, productive and collaborative way we can and will impact real change,” Congressman Evans said.“We all have a role to play in making a change – from community members to police officers, prosecutors, elected officials and everyone in between,” Sen. Farnese said. “Criminal justice reform doesn’t begin or end in our prisons. It starts at the community level by addressing the fact that too many people are incarcerated as a first response.”State Rep. Donna Bullock, D-Phila., vice chair of the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus, said, “I’m encouraged by the growing bipartisan support for criminal justice reform. I look forward to working with my colleagues to advance legislation that will foster a fair and just system — a system that allows people to get their life back on track without unnecessary barriers. We have been making progress, but there’s much more to do before the legislative session ends in November.”“I commend Governor Wolf for listening to the public outcry around criminal justice reform and actively taking steps to shine a light on the issue,” said Michael Rubin. “Fixing a system that cost my friend Meek Mill nearly six months of his life is personal to me, but also extremely important to ensure more people are kept out of prison or released who shouldn’t be incarcerated for technical probation violations. I’m glad the Governor is tackling this initiative head-on and I’m proud to offer my support.”“It was my pleasure to stand with Governor Wolf and support his initiatives to reform the Pennsylvania criminal justice system,” said Meek Mill. “I know firsthand the flaws in the system, so I’m greatly encouraged by the Governor’s commitment to ensuring a fair sentencing process and ultimately ending the unjust cycle of incarceration in our state.”“We need to do the work to make our criminal justice system fairer, more equitable, and more focused on rehabilitation,” Governor Wolf said. “Since I became Governor, I have worked hard to reform our system so that it leads to better outcomes and saves taxpayer dollars – while also leading to less crime and fewer victims.“Let’s continue to work towards building the criminal justice system we all want to see in Pennsylvania.” May 03, 2018 Criminal Justice Reform,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today joined Congressman Dwight Evans, Senator Larry Farnese, Representative Donna Bullock, legislators, and advocacy groups in a call-to-action for criminal justice reforms to refocus the system on rehabilitation and provide consistency and uniformity in the system. The governor was also joined by artist Robert “Meek Mill” Williams and Sixers Co-Owner and entrepreneur Michael Rubin.“The debate about how we can fix our criminal justice system is complicated, and over time that debate has changed to reflect the modern realities and issues present in our system,” Governor Wolf said. “I believe that we can improve the criminal justice system, so that we can protect victims while also ending a cycle of incarceration that has left so many people feeling trapped, helpless, and without an opportunity to return to society after they have been released.”The governor outlined a package of reform initiatives, including:center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Leads Call-to-Action for Criminal Justice Reformlast_img read more

Former OFBF Executive Vice President Bill Swank dies at 88

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest C. William Swank, who served as Ohio Farm Bureau executive vice president from 1968-1996, died Sept. 21, 2019. Swank helped Ohio Farm Bureau grow into the advocacy organization it is today, all the while keeping the economic and social well being of farm families top of mind.Among the most important legislative accomplishments that occurred during his tenure were the establishment of Current Agriculture Use Value (CAUV) program, the phase out of the personal property tax for agricultural production and in 1992 leading a coalition of business and industry groups against Issue 5, the chemical labeling law ballot initiative.During his 40-year career, Swank received the Ohio State University Board of Trustees Distinguished Service Award, Ohio Farm Bureau’s Distinguished Service Award and is a member of the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame, to name just a few.A U.S. Air Force veteran, Swank earned his Bachelor of Science, master’s and doctorate from Ohio State University and was recognized by the university in many ways, including the establishment of an endowed chair in Rural\Urban Policy. An economist and participant in agricultural issues nationally and internationally, Swank regularly kept in touch with Farm Bureau staff and industry leaders on current issues.“Bill Swank was one of the true giants in Ohio agriculture,” said Adam Sharp, Ohio Farm Bureau executive vice president. “His visionary leadership built Farm Bureau into a powerful tool for farm families and helped guide the entire food and farm industry.  His passion for farmers was unmatched. He was smart, funny and kind. All of us in agriculture today are benefiting from his legacy.”He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Helen, and two daughters and their families, including nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his son, Michael.Remember that we are always looking at a parade of people. They’re moving through and past–it’s never done. You can know and teach that group that’s right in front of you, but pretty soon, they’re not here and it’s a new group. We’ve got the knowledge that there always is this parade of people, a parade of issues–it never stops and so our work is never done. ~ C. William Swank in his 1995 retirement address at the 77th Ohio Farm Bureau annual meeting.Service detailsFamily will receive friends from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019 at The Church of the Messiah, U.M., 51 N. State St., Westerville where services will follow at 11 a.m. Saturday.Photo caption: In 2017, former Executive Vice President Bill Swank (pictured with his wife, Helen, and OFBF Executive Vice President Adam Sharp) was honored at the Ohio Farm Bureau state office. The executive conference room, which holds not only meetings but plaques and awards from Swank’s time as executive vice president, was renamed the C. William Swank Executive Conference Room.last_img read more

Video: No. 9 Notre Dame Avoided The Upset Against Virginia On A Stunning Last-Second TD

first_imgWill Fuler sprints past Virginia defender on his way to the end zone.Will FulerNo. 9 Notre Dame used some luck of the Irish to pull out a 34-27 victory over Virginia on the road. With starting quarterback Malik Zaire out of the game with what appeared to be a serious ankle injury, and his team trailing 27-26, back-up QB DeShone Kizer took the team downfield in the final minutes, tossing the game winning touchdown to wide receiver Will Fuller with 12 seconds remaining. Fuller’s game-winning score stunned the upset-minded Cavalier faithful.  pic.twitter.com/o92NxfHftl— Luke Zimmermann (@lukezim) September 12, 2015Wow. What a gut-wrenching loss for Mike London and the Cavs, and what an escape for Brian Kelly and the Fighting Irish.last_img read more

Canada trails Europe and US when adopting tech says Amazon Canada exec

first_imgTORONTO – Canadian businesses are slower to adopt new technology than their European and American counterparts, according to Canada’s head of Amazon Web Services.The e-commerce giant has noticed it takes more education and convincing to get Canadian firms to embrace the industry’s latest advancements, Eric Gales, country manager of Amazon’s cloud-computing subsidiary AWS told The Canadian Press.“The U.K. is very competitive because the whole country is just that much more dense, so that has a function in driving things like adoptions,” said Gales, who moved to Canada in 2006 from the U.K. and spent 13 years working for Microsoft before joining Amazon. “Here, we find adoption rates of new technologies are generally a bit slower.”He’s noticed that by the time a typical business in Canada adopts a product, the next version or feature with enhanced capabilities is already available because someone else pushed for it previously.The disparity stems in part from what Gales considers to be an “old model” of business, where quick adoption was mainly the privilege of companies who could afford to make large investments in platforms and features that would grow their business and help them beat competitors.As technology gets cheaper, more companies can afford to indulge in the latest gadgets and software, breaking down the gap between the “haves and have-nots.”But not all companies have seized the opportunity, so Gales said Amazon is “spending a lot of time and energy on helping customers appreciate what’s possible” and dispelling the “complicated” and “scary” reputation of artificial intelligence and machine learning.It takes more than just name-dropping big American or European brands that have latched onto new technology to get Canadian companies to follow suit, he added.“The customers I meet with want to know about Canadian examples (because) those Canadian examples generally act as the beacon, the signal that it’s okay to move forward.”That means he’s talking a lot about Vancouver-based athletic apparel company Lululemon, which adopted AWS products after finding its own system was too costly and slow. Similarly, National Bank of Canada’s global equity derivatives group looked to AWS when its hardware and databases couldn’t keep up with growth.Gales is not the first to assert that the Canadian business community’s adoption of technology can be slow.In April, a Dell and Intel-backed study from research firm PSB revealed 35 per cent of Canadians thought the technology they had at home was more advanced than what their office was outfitted with.Long before that, industries were bemoaning how the country constantly lags behind, but that isn’t the case in every sector, said Rafik Loutfy, director of Ryerson University’s Centre for Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship.Canada has been on track with financial technology, automotive, processing and aerospace technology, but retail hasn’t fared as well, he said.“Look what happened to Eatons and Sears (Canada),” Loutfy said of the chains that filed for bankruptcy, shuttering their department stores across Canada. “Both were slow to adopt e-commerce.”That same reluctance can trickle down to consumers, he said, noting that some Canadian start-ups struggle to find customers at home and have to resort to earning 80 to 90 per cent of their profits from American buyers.“We tend to be more conservative in Canada than in the U.S. and in England and then we fall behind and it costs us.”last_img read more

First Nations poised to challenge Nova Scotias marijuana monopoly

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia First Nations appear poised to take on the province’s marijuana monopoly — including one Mi’kmaq community that has enlisted Olympian Ross Rebagliati to roll out a “seed to sale” cannabis operation.Sipekne’katik First Nation in Indian Brook, N.S., has plans to grow cannabis and sell it directly to consumers, while Millbrook First Nation is considering retail locations, bypassing the provincial Crown corporation slated to control sales once the drug is legal on Oct. 17.The government says selling cannabis from a privately owned storefront will remain illegal in Nova Scotia, but Rebagliati argues that First Nations lands are federal jurisdiction and they are within their rights to set up dispensaries.The disagreement could set the stage for a potential constitutional showdown over cannabis sales.“This is precedent-setting,” Rebagliati, a gold-medal snowboarder, cannabis expert and entrepreneur said in an interview this week after his second visit to the Mi’kmaq community formerly called the Shubenacadie First Nation. “It’s rather unfortunate (the province) is taking that route.”Canada’s provinces and territories have opted for one of three retail models for over-the-counter cannabis sales: Private, public or a hybrid of the two.In Nova Scotia, sales will be government-controlled.“We have said all along that our approach to legalization is through a public health lens and that we will start well-regulated and tightly controlled,” a Department of Justice spokeswoman said in a statement.“At this time, we are not considering a retail model outside of the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation.”The province’s stringent stance doesn’t appear to deter First Nations communities, with the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs indicating it is exploring the economic opportunities of cannabis.Rebagliati said the Mi’kmaq community in Indian Brook has a strong plan, and he’s put together a “gold-medal team” to help them reach their goal.“The model is to go seed to sale and that boosts the margins quite substantially and gives them a competitive edge,” he said from B.C. “They came to me with their ideas and they are super progressive.“First Nations are looking for job opportunities and economic opportunities for their people, and this is a new industry that has a lot of those opportunities and potential for substantial financial gain.”Chief Bob Gloade of Millbrook First Nation said the community has invested in a cannabis company and is considering opening a storefront.“We’re focusing on the retail side of it going forward and we’re working on details in that respect,” he said, adding that for now the community isn’t considering launching its own production.“We’re still looking at a couple of years out before we’ll start seeing the benefits from an economic standpoint … but it will have a significant impact,” Gloade said.Sipekne’katik Chief Michael Sack did not respond to multiple requests for comment, but Rebagliati confirmed that he met with the community leader in March and again this week.Rebagliati founded Ross’ Gold, a medical marijuana business, in 2013. Earlier this year he launched LegacyRR, which focuses on growing cannabis and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.Although he said the details of an agreement between LegacyRR and the Sipene’katik First Nation are still being worked out, he said the Indigenous community’s dispensaries could be branded Mi’kmaq Legacy.McGill University constitutional law professor Mark Walters said the situation raises important and controversial legal and constitutional issues.“Legal conflicts on this point are bound to flare up in many places across Canada,” he said in an email, noting it appears many First Nations are making plans to grow and sell cannabis.Walters said it’s difficult to say whether provinces have the right to prevent First Nations from selling cannabis on reserve.He said the “orthodox” legal answer would be that provincial laws on cannabis sales will apply on reserves, unless a First Nation could show that regulating the sale of cannabis was a custom, practice or tradition integral to its distinctive culture, which might be extremely difficult to do.However, Walters said there’s a strong argument that federal law protects a much broader right to Aboriginal self-government than the courts have so far acknowledged.“There is considerable room here for an interpretation of the law that would acknowledge Indigenous rights of self-government over this issue,” he said.Wayne MacKay, professor emeritus of law at Dalhousie University, called it a “very complex” issue.He said one the strongest arguments for the Mi’kmaq community would be a treaty rights claim to a moderate livelihood under the Supreme Court’s Marshall decision.MacKay added that “the core of their argument would likely be the right of First Nations to manage their own resources as part of their constitutional rights to self government.”last_img read more