Fans travel for international season opener

first_imgDUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said gameday in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame gameday until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”,DUBLIN – It would be hard to determine who enjoyed their Irish experience even more – the Notre Dame football team, who throttled Navy 50-10 in their season opener, or Fighting Irish fans, who enjoyed all the Irish capital had to offer over several days of Celtic fun. Thousands of fans descended upon the Irish capital for the Emerald Isle Classic festivities, including a pep rally in The O2, tailgate in the Temple Bar District and to cap off the weekend, the season-opening football game against Navy in Aviva Stadium. Even Irish football coach Brian Kelly said he enjoyed his time in Dublin during his postgame press conference, despite previously saying while a fan of Ireland, he didn’t relish the idea of playing a game overseas. “[Ireland is] such a friendly place,” he said. “[There is] beautiful scenery. The hospitality was amazing. It just feels welcoming coming to Ireland.” Kelly said playing an international game represents a unique opportunity for the University. “It galvanizes your fans, your alumni, everybody that is a Notre Dame supporter, you get the opportunity to bring everybody together in such a great atmosphere,” he said. Kelly quipped that now the team had the logistics for traveling mapped out, the Fighting Irish would be more than happy to make a return trip. “We’ll be back any time you ask us,” he said. For fans that made the trip, the weekend was a resounding success. Senior Elliott Pearce said game day in Dublin surpassed even that of a home Notre Dame football game in South Bend. “It’s a lot more exciting, I think,” he said. “Everybody’s excited to come to Ireland and visiting Dublin and being in a new city, and being welcomed as warmly as we have by the Irish people here [has been great.] Everyone’s been in a good mood and been happy.” Caroline Gallagher, a Saint Mary’s senior, said the weekend’s events were made even more special by the fact she studied abroad in Ireland her sophomore year. “It’s the combining of two forces I really love, Notre Dame and Ireland,” she said. “I think it is the atmosphere that has made it a little bit extra [special]. It’s nice to see Notre Dame and South Bend in Dublin.” Pearce said Notre Dame’s already existing Irish identity was accentuated by the game’s location. “Notre Dame folks like to think they’re Irish, and we get a very Irish vibe,” he said. “It’s almost like it is done to an even greater degree here, because this is actually Ireland. There are [thousands] of us here, and that makes it feel even more like a Notre Dame place.” Playing more international games in the future should be in store for Notre Dame, Pearce said. “I think it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “I’m looking forward to going to the next one.” Gallagher also said an international game has benefits for all of those involved. “I think it is really good for a fan base, and that it is good for the University and for both countries to have an alliance.” For juniors studying abroad in Dublin at University College of Dublin (UCD) and Trinity College this semester, Saturday’s game was their only opportunity to experience a Notre Dame game day until their senior year. Sara Dryden, a junior set to study at UCD for the semester said the Emerald Isle Classic was the perfect way to kick off her semester in Dublin. “We knew [about the game] when we were applying, so that kind of factored into where we were going to apply,” she said. “But Ireland is great for everything else … Ireland was always my first choice, but it was an extra boost.” Patrick Schmitz, a junior set to study at Trinity College, came to Ireland early to attend the game. He said as soon as he stepped off the plane in Ireland, the hospitality of the host nation was in full effect. “It’s been very welcoming,” he said. “Just arriving at the airport, everything was decked out with American flags and Notre Dame flags and Navy flags. They were very excited about it, and it made me even more excited than I would be about a regular game.” Schmitz said attending the season opener compensated for the fact it would be his only football game of the year. “I was upset that I wasn’t going to be at all the other home games, but I think this made up for all the home games I am missing,” he said. Notre Dame alumni made up a large contingent of the thousands of Fighting Irish fans who made the trip overseas. One of those alumni, Arnie Vance, a member of the Class of 1968, attended through the Notre Dame Club of Greater Sarasota. Vance, who serves as president of the club, said 37 club members made the trip, including alumni ranging from the classes of 1952 to 2007. Like Pearce and Gallagher, Vance said he hopes more international games are in Notre Dame’s future. “It’s a wonderful idea,” he said. “We should do it every 10 years or so. We should do it again.”last_img read more

Feds to table budget Feb 27 as Canada faces trade competitiveness uncertainty

first_imgOTTAWA – Finance Minister Bill Morneau will introduce the federal government’s next budget on Feb. 27 as the country faces persistent uncertainty around trade and competitiveness.With the future clouded by such unknowns, private-sector experts will press Morneau to keep his fiscal powder dry when they gather later this week for their annual pre-budget meeting.Morneau, who announced the budget date Tuesday in the House of Commons, sits down Friday in Toronto with leading economists at a roundtable that typically includes about a dozen experts from commercial banks, think tanks and trade associations.Finance ministers routinely call on outside economists for input and forecasts as part of the budget-writing process. Their projections are averaged to create a fiscal foundation for the budget.Some economists say that late-2017 improvements in the economy will likely give Morneau more fiscal elbow room in the budget, compared to his October update. Others are less optimistic about the changes in recent months and expect the government to find itself in a similar budgetary position.But regardless of the fiscal footing, there’s agreement that the government should proceed with caution. They want Ottawa to make sure it’s ready for the still-unknown impacts of the drawn-out renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the U.S. move to slash corporate taxes.“Those are definitely the big two — there’s no question about it — and the kind of chill that that could potentially put on the business investment climate in Canada,” said BMO chief economist Doug Porter, whose colleague will attend the Morneau meeting in his place“That’s a tough twosome to deal with.”Last month, the Bank of Canada highlighted the widening negative impacts of NAFTA’s uncertain future. The bank not only made a point of emphasizing the potential effects on trade, but also the potential damage on business investment caused by uncertainty itself.The central bank estimated trade uncertainty would lower investment by two per cent by the end of 2019. It said new foreign direct investment into Canada had tumbled since mid-2016 — a possible consequence of the unknowns around trade.The bank also warned that lower corporate taxes in the U.S. could encourage firms to redirect some of their business investments south of the border.Business associations fear the U.S. tax changes could end up inflicting more damage on the Canadian economy than the possible termination of NAFTA.Morneau’s office has responded to the concerns by arguing that Canada has advantages such as an educated workforce and still boasts a competitive tax rate among G7 countries, even after the U.S. reforms. Ottawa is carefully assessing the U.S. tax changes and will take time to fully understand their potential impacts, his office said in a recent statement.Scotiabank chief economist Jean-Francois Perrault said he doesn’t think the corporate tax changes in the U.S. will have a major impact on Canada — but he admits they could.Perrault, who will attend Friday’s meeting with Morneau, recommends the government hold off on any big spending plans just in case it needs to respond with tax measures of its own to keep Canada competitive.“It would be very prudent for the government to wait until we see if, in fact, there is evidence that what’s happening down south in the U.S. is having a detrimental effect on Canadian business,” Perrault said.Heading into the budget, he thinks the solid economy has given Morneau more fiscal space than he had in the fall.In October, Morneau’s fall fiscal statement predicted a deficit of $18.4 billion in 2017-18 and a $15.6-billion shortfall in 2018-19.Perrault, a former assistant deputy minister under Morneau, said he now expects Ottawa to be on track for deficits of $16.8 billion in 2017-18 and $14.8 billion in 2018-19.Porter doesn’t think there have been major changes in the government’s budgetary outlook since the fall because 2017’s surprising strength was largely due to temporary factors. This year, the economy, while still looking relatively healthy, should be a little bit cooler, he added.Craig Alexander, chief economist for The Conference Board of Canada, predicts the deficit to be about $4 billion smaller in 2017-18.“But going forward, they’re not going to have a lot of extra money in the kitty for new initiatives if they want to keep debt-to-GDP ratio on a downward path,” he said.Following the 2015 election, the Liberal government abandoned pledges to run annual deficits of no more than $10 billion and to balance the books in four years. Instead, it is focused on reducing the net debt-to-GDP ratio — also known as the debt burden — each year.Alexander would like to see Morneau produce a plan to balance the books, while Perrault is less concerned about it as long as Ottawa keeps lowering the debt-to-GDP.Porter would also like to see an effort to eliminate the deficit because Canada is entering a late stage in the economic cycle — but it’s not his top priority.“I’m concerned about our tax competitiveness first and foremost, and that’s actually where I’d like to see the government concentrate efforts.”On Tuesday, Morneau offered a preview of what the government narrative surrounding the budget will likely sound like.“We’ve seen real improvements over the last couple of years for middle-class Canadians — more confidence and among the lowest unemployment rates in the last 40 years,” he said during question period.“But there’s more work to do, Mr. Speaker. On Feb. 27, we’re going to announce the next budget to continue our plan.”Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre, for one, wasn’t about to wait for Feb. 27 to pass judgment on the government’s plans.“This government is spending money it does not have on things we do not need,” Poilievre said. “The Conservative message to the government is when you’re in a hole, quit digging. The deficit is twice what they promised.”— Follow @AndyBlatchford on Twitterlast_img read more

Crossroads of the West discussion instudio with guest Tiffany Cheuvront

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – California Rifle & Pistol Association activists are working to make sure the “Crossroads of the West” gun show at the Del Mar Fairgrounds will continue to take place after December 31.Civil Rights Attorney for the California Rifle AND Pistol Association Tiffany Cheuvront joined us in-studio Monday for more. Posted: September 10, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News, Politics FacebookTwitter September 10, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, center_img KUSI Newsroom “Crossroads of the West” discussion in-studio, with guest Tiffany Cheuvront Updated: 10:41 PMlast_img read more

Blue colour of the soul

first_imgThe Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre has organised an exhibition of spiritual paintings titled Planetary Consciousness by Hungarian artist Jeno Balogh that starts on 23 September.  The exhibition will be inaugurated by Prof. Om Prakash Sharma, artist, Former Principal of Delhi College of Art, New Delhi.Balogh expressed, ‘My paintings depict a world without people, warning that this is going to happen if we continue this way of exploitation to the Earth. I mostly paint with blue colour that is the colour of Planet Earth and also the colour of soul. However, I also use red that is the colour of Mars, a lifeless planet. For me painting is a token of energy, coming from my soul.’ Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Jeno Balogh has  been painting for over 40 years now. He was the President of the local Art Association for 23 years and organised several charity exhibitions. He had a number of solo and group exhibitions in Hungary and abroad like Montevideo, Santiago de Chile, Rio de Janeiro, New Delhi. In Athens, he was awarded with a bronze medal at the Cultural Olympics. He is also a member of the International Artists’ Association and the Association of Greek Artists. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘Save our Planet and Planetary Consciousness’ are the mottos that my art work is focused on. We have one planet only where we should live in an environment-conscious way and in peace to protect our Planet Earth. In order to be able to implement this consciousness in our daily life, one should have a mindful soul which, I think, people don’t possess anymore,’ explained Balogh. When: 23 September – 17 October Where: Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre, 1-A Japath Timing: 10 am – 4 pm (weekdays only)last_img read more

ExNFL Star Chad Ochocinco Johnson Scores a Touchdown for Bitcoin Awareness on

first_img 2 min read Charlie Shrem may be on house arrest, but Bitcoin has another new celeb champion, and his record is cleaner than “Bitcoin Bill” Congressman Steve Stockman. Well, somewhat.If you guessed Chad ‘Ochocinco’ Johnson, you’re right. Yeah, we didn’t see this one coming either.  The former NFL bad-boy wide receiver, who burned through short-lived, tumultuous stints with the Cincinnati Bengals, the New England Patriots and the Miami Dolphins, is the latest pro athlete to hop aboard the celebrity Bitcoin bandwagon. Or to at least think about it.Related: 3 Celebs Jumping on the Bitcoin Bandwagon (and One Who Says She’s an ‘Idiot’ for Missing It)The hot-tempered VH1 “Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch” dating show star tweeted about his budding interest in the complex digital currency yesterday.Discussing the concept of @Bitcoin with a friend. Can y’all show me how easy it is? #Bitcoin pic.twitter.com/blS4OVPe37— Chad Johnson (@ochocinco) April 14, 2014 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. A handful of Twitter users responded to the not exactly viral tweet (by this afternoon, it had only garnered only 47 retweets and 41 favorites), perhaps hoping to give the Miami native a leg up in unravelling the enigma that is Bitcoin. One even pointed out that Bitcoin isn’t taxable. Wrong!Ochocinco’s apparently still only in the early “what the heck is Bitcoin” phase we all went through, and he’s been “discussing the concept” with a friend. He seems far from ready to accept Bitcoin as a form of payment for fan gear, however, like Seattle Seahawks’ cornerback Richard Sherman recently started doing.  Maybe Johnson, a prolific serial tweeter, was trying to be ironic when he asked the Twitterverse “Can y’all show me how easy it [Bitcoin] is?”Lesson No. 1: Bitcoin and easy don’t go well together. Just ask Shrem. Related: The Winklevoss Twins Score Virgin Galactic Tickets to Space, Paying With Bitcoin April 15, 2014 Register Now »last_img read more

Breezes Bahamas slashes winter prices by 40

first_img Share Tuesday, January 31, 2017 Posted by NASSAU – The winter season is definitely warming up, thanks to Breezes Resort & Spa – Bahamas’ new 40% off sale. Launched just in time for couples to book romantic Valentine’s Day getaways, and ideal for early planners looking to book their next Christmas holidays, the sale allows guests to enjoy Nassau’s first and only Super-Inclusive resort at nearly half the cost.To take advantage of the sale, clients must book by Feb. 28 for travel through Dec. 31, 2017.In addition, Breezes Bahamas has just introduced a new room category, the Deluxe Patio Room, including Deluxe Patio Garden View rooms and Deluxe Patio Pool View rooms, all on the ground floor featuring outdoor patio spaces for added privacy. Each patio space comes equipped with a table and two chairs or a two-person hammock. All guest rooms in this category have modern glass, chrome and marble bathrooms, mahogany wood furnishings, a work desk and chair, satellite TV and either one king size bed or two double beds.More news:  Kory Sterling is TL Network Canada’s new Sales Manager CanadaRegular rates for the new Deluxe Patio Rooms are US$290 per person, per night, but with the 40% off sale, starting rates drop as low as $174 per person, per night. A weekend surcharge applies to Thursday, Friday and Saturday night stays.For more information go to breezes.com. Tags: Breezes Resort & Spalast_img read more