Twiddle Announces Support For Upcoming “Frendsgiving” Thanksgiving Run

first_imgLast month, Vermont jam band Twiddle announced the group’s upcoming Thanksgiving run. The run will kick off with a show on Wednesday, November 21st, at The Fillmore in Philadelphia, PA, followed by a two-night “Frendsgiving” celebration on Friday and Saturday, November 23rd and 24th, at The Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY. As previously announced, Boston-based rock group Ripe will open the show in Philadelphia.Twiddle has since shared their special “Frends” for the upcoming Capitol Theatre shows. On Friday, November 23rd, Montana-based bluegrass sensations Kitchen Dwellers will handle the night’s opening duties, while Eric Krasno Band is set to open things up the following night on Saturday, November 24th.Twiddle’s Frendsgiving run falls at the tail end of a heavy fall touring schedule. The four-piece recently announced a Boston NYE run, as well as a Halloween run at Washington, D.C.’s 9:30 Club that falls between Twiddle’s two previously announced late-2018 tours. This includes the band’s own headlining fall tour, which began at the end of August, and ran through the beginning of October. Twiddle also has a stretch of upcoming dates supporting SOJA, which will take them down the West Coast and into the South throughout the month of November.Twiddle also recently announced a Halloween-proper collaboration with Phil Lesh, set for October 31st. Dubbed Phil-O-Ween, the three-set celebration will kick off with GEM, the trio whose name is derived from the first initials of its members: Midnight North’s Grahame Lesh and Elliot Peck and Twiddle’s Mihali Savoulidis. Then, Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band will perform a set together. To close out the evening, Phil Lesh and Twiddle will team up for their collaborative project, Phiddle.Tickets for the Capitol Theatre shows can be purchased here for November 23rd, and here for November 24th.For a full list of Twiddle’s upcoming tour dates, or for more information, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

Claims of voter fraud are common. It’s the fraud that’s rare.

first_img– Advertisement – Famously, there was the story that Senator Christopher S. Bond, Republican of Missouri, told in 2000 about a 13-year-old springer spaniel that was registered to vote in St. Louis. Mr. Bond was making a case that more anti-fraud protections, like requiring identification, were needed after his colleague, Senator John Ashcroft, lost his seat when more Missourians voted for a dead man: Gov. Mel Carnahan, who had been killed in a plane crash several weeks before the election but remained on the ballot. Mr. Ashcroft did not challenge the results.The fantasy of a stolen election has elements that Mr. Trump has long incorporated into his narrative about himself. There are clear perpetrators (undocumented immigrants, big-city Democratic political machines) and a victim (him) — and usually enough ambiguity so he can float outlandish but unsubstantiated rumors.He has been laying the groundwork for refusing to concede for some time. Speaking in September to Mark Levin, the talk radio and Fox News host, Mr. Trump suggested that some voters were receiving multiple ballots in the mail. He said: “People are saying, ‘Hey, what’s going on? I just got a whole batch of ballots.’” In reality, elections officials across the country, representing both parties, said there was no evidence that fraud had played any role in determining the election outcome this year. The most common claims of voter fraud — reports of ballots cast by someone voting twice, or by a dead person or someone who is otherwise ineligible — can almost always be traced back to a misunderstanding like a typo, a clerical error or a false assumption that two people with a common name are actually the same person, according to the Brennan Center.Still, the topic has been a staple of coverage on Fox News going back to the 2000s, when hosts like Bill O’Reilly spread exaggerated stories about immigrants who were voting illegally, campaigns that paid people for their votes and community groups like ACORN whose employees had submitted fraudulent voter registrations. (The ACORN employees, who were also the subject of an attack ad that John McCain’s campaign ran against Barack Obama in 2008, did not appear to be attempting to influence voting, but rather to get paid for voter registration work they hadn’t actually done.)Claims of voter fraud have often involved absurd and far-fetched scenarios — dead people, dogs, busloads of people of color — which is another way they live on in the public imagination. In recent years, conservative activists have pushed unverified reports that buses full of illegal voters showed up at polling places from California to Wisconsin. As a news story, it is sensational and often irresistible. The Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law examined its enduring appeal in a 2007 report, observing that ballot fraud has “the feel of a bank heist caper: roundly condemned but technically fascinating, and sufficiently lurid to grab and hold headlines.”The subject’s prevalence in the conservative news media, where it is treated as a more widespread problem than the facts show, may help explain how Mr. Trump, a ravenous consumer of cable news, came to be so fixated.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Voter fraud is one of the oldest charges a politician can level in American elections — though no president in modern times has done so with such frequency, and so little evidence, as President Trump. In the 1941 Orson Welles epic “Citizen Kane,” newspapermen huddle near the printing press on election night as it becomes clear that the results won’t be good news for their boss, the publishing mogul Charles Foster Kane.One of them holds up a front page with the headline they had hoped for: “Kane Elected.” He then lowers his head and nods toward the version they have to go with instead. “Fraud at Polls!” it declares. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Pacquiao tests negative for coronavirus

first_imgRelatedPosts Italy introduces compulsory virus testing for travellers from France Nigeria records new COVID-19 infections, more deaths as figures rise to 57,242 I was in best of forms before Tokyo Paralympics was postponed — Powerlifter Ejike Manny Pacquiao said he has tested negative for Coronavirus Disease after the eight-weight boxing world champion and Philippines senator came into contact with a politician who had contracted the disease. The 41-year-old, who holds the WBA welterweight world title, was recently pictured with Senate President Aquilino ‘Koko’ Pimental, who subsequently tested positive for COVID-19. In a statement, Pacquiao said he was already in quarantine and had used an unapproved rapid testing kit from South Korea to determine if he had been infected. However, he added that if he or his family exhibits any symptom, he will not hesitate to undergo swab testing. “My countrymen, I would like to make it clear that even before I received the letter from [Dasmarinas Village, Makati] Barangay Captain Rossana Hwang, I already started home quarantine,” Pacquiao said. “Please don’t worry. I received rapid testing kits from my friends from South Korea. Using these kits approved in Korea, I tested negative. The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] hasn’t approved them yet but these are what’s used in Korea. “I’ve been encouraged a while back to get tested at RITM [Research Institute for Tropical Medicine], but I want to let it be known that I have not felt any symptoms. “It’s an entirely different conversation when I’m feeling something strange in my body. I am willing to undergo swab testing for the sake of my family and my country, but I will go through the regular procedure. “I believe that there are many more persons under investigation or PUI that should be prioritised in testing.” The news comes after Pacquiao claimed he “was not afraid to die” to help those affected by the disease in the Philippines. “If you are a leader, you have to be a frontliner,” Pacquiao said. “You have to lead and let people see that you are with them. I grew up poor. I know what they feel.” There have been 1,418 cases of coronavirus reported so far in the Philippines, with 71 casualties.Tags: Aquilino PimentalCoronavirusManny PacquiaoRossana Hwanglast_img read more