UK: Crew Says Farewell to HMS Cornwall

first_img View post tag: UK View post tag: says View post tag: News by topic Authorities View post tag: Naval View post tag: crew July 6, 2011 Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: Crew Says Farewell to HMS Cornwall View post tag: Farewell The crew of HMS Cornwall said farewell to the ship last week at a decommissioning ceremony at Devonport Naval Base.The ceremony, held on Thursday 1 July 2011, marked the retirement of the ship from the Royal Navy after 23 years, and was an occasion for the ship’s captain, Commander David Wilkinson, to pay tribute to her affiliated organisations and the county of Cornwall as a whole for their support.Commander Wilkinson said he and the ship’s company had been proud to represent the nation and Cornwall worldwide on operations and other duties.The event included a parade of the crew, a band of the Royal Marines, a religious service, the ceremonial final sounding of the ship’s bell and the lowering of the commissioning pennant, White Ensign and Union Flag.HMS Cornwall, known as the ‘Fighting 99′, is the last of the Type 22 frigates to be decommissioned under the MOD’s Strategic Defence and Security Review. Sister ships HMS Cumberland, HMS Chatham and HMS Campbeltown have preceded HMS Cornwall.The ship has circumnavigated the globe, visited every ocean, taken part in Cold War operations, and recently served east of Suez on counter-piracy duties.Commander Wilkinson described his ship as world-beating and was proud to have served with his crew over the last 13 months, who he thanked for their support and professionalism. He said they were both compassionate and aggressive when needed, served with good grace and humour, and were his strength.He added: “My ship’s company have been fantastic, a wonderful example of the youth of today. I look back on my command with pride. It is an honour to be the last commanding officer of HMS Cornwall. “I hope the people of Cornwall have good memories of HMS Cornwall and all who served on her. This was an occasion to say farewell and to thank the county of Cornwall. The freedom of the city of Truro parade by the ship’s company on the 13th of July is a chance for the country to say goodbye to us.”Chief Petty Officer John Midwood, of Dewsbury, near Leeds, lowered the White Ensign for the last time at the stern of the ship.Most of the crew will stay together until late October 2011 after which they will attend courses and move onto new posts. In the meantime the physical decommissioning process will continue but the future of the ship is yet to be determined.[mappress]Source: mod, July 6, 2011 View post tag: HMS View post tag: Navy UK: Crew Says Farewell to HMS Cornwall Share this article View post tag: Cornwalllast_img read more

University names valedictorian, salutatorian for 2019 commencement ceremonies

first_imgSeniors Sofia Carozza and Annelise Gill-Wiehl will be valedictorian and salutatorian of the 2019 Notre Dame graduating class, respectively, the University announced in a press release Wednesday.The two were chosen following an application process that invites the top three students of each school in the University with the highest grade point average to submit faculty recommendations and a draft of their commencement speech. The press release said a selection committee chose the finalists who were then approved by University President Fr. John Jenkins.A native of South Bend and a graduate of Saint Joseph High School, Carozza is a neuroscience and behavior major with a supplemental major in theology as well as a minor in philosophy, politics and economics. Carrying a 4.0 grade point average, Carozza is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar and a de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture Sorin Fellow, the press release said.Over the course of her time at Notre Dame, Carozza has been involved with the Institute for Advanced Study, ND Students for Worker Justice, Show Some Skin and Baraka Bouts, the press release said. The statement said Carozza is fluent in Italian, conversational in Spanish and is a classically trained harpist. She was named a recipient of the Marshall Scholarship in December, which will allow her pursue a master of philosophy in basic and translational neuroscience and eventually a doctorate at the University of Cambridge in England.In the community, Carozza is also a mental health coach for at-risk youth and is involved with heading an exercise program at the St. Joseph County Juvenile Justice Center. During her summers, she has tutored disabled children in Paraguay at the National Institute for International Studies at Notre Dame, conducted neuroscience research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and studied toxic stress at the ChildWise Institute in Montana.Hailing from St. Louis, Gill-Wiehl is an environmental engineering major with a minor in international development studies. A member of the Chi Epsilon civil engineering honor society and Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society, Gill-Wiehl has performed research at the University through the Kellogg Institute and the Atmospheric Chemistry and Aerosol Modeling Group on topics such as environmental sustainability and infrastructure, the release said.On campus, Gill-Wiehl is involved with Kellogg Institute International Scholars, NDSEED and student government, in addition to serving as co-president of GlobeMed. She is also a member of both the Chi Epsilon civil engineering honor society and the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. She is also conversational in Swahili.Gill-Wiehl has been recognized for work at Notre Dame in the past with the Rev. Thomas A. Steiner Award in the College of Engineering for excellence and commitment to engineering and to the common good as well as the John W. Gardner Student Leadership Award for exemplifying the ideals of the University through outstanding volunteer service beyond campus, the release said. Gill-Wiehl plans to attend the University of California, Berkeley to pursue a doctorate in energy resources.Tags: 2019 Commencement, 2019 salutatorian, 2019 valedictorian, salutatorian, valedictorianlast_img read more

Report: Explosion Reported on board Stricken Iranian Tanker

first_imgAn explosion has been reported Wednesday on board the Iranian tanker Sanchi, which has been burning for four days off the eastern coast of China, CNN informed citing local authorities.Due to the explosion, the 14 rescue vessels scavenging the area for potential survivors had to retreat. 31 mariners of the 32 members of Sanchi’s crew remain unaccounted for. The body of one crew member has been recovered.Local authorities warned earlier that there is a danger of the ship exploding, breaking into half and sinking, resulting in a major oil spill.Efforts to put out the fire continue to be underway for the fourth day since the collision between the tanker and a Hong Kong-flagged bulker CF Crystal. Nevertheless, the activities remain to be hampered by the fire and thick smoke billowing from the stricken vessel, along with harsh weather conditions.It is estimated that the fire could burn for a period ranging from two weeks to a month, Reuters reported earlier citing an official from South Korea’s Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries.The ill-fated tanker, owned by Bright Shipping Ltd and managed by National Iranian Tanker Co. (NITC), is loaded with 136,000 tons of Iranian crude oil.CF Crystal has berthed in Zhoushan since the incident where the maritime authorities will launch an investigation into the collision.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Institute for Global Health discusses HIV epidemic, human rights

first_imgMandeep Dhaliwal, director of the United Nations Development Programme, and Jeffrey O’Malley, former director of UNICEF’s Division of Data, Research, and Policy, spoke about HIV in Africa and India. (Sunny Dong | Daily Trojan)The USC Institute for Global Health held an event on Wednesday to discuss the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, the HIV epidemic and human rights. The event is part of the “Wicked Problems” multi-disciplinary practicum, a hands-on course for select USC students to tackle local issues of health, inequality and sustainability, but the seminar was open to the public.Mandeep Dhaliwal, director of the United Nations Development Programme HIV, Health and Development Group was joined by Jeffrey O’Malley, former director of UNICEF’s Division of Data, Research, and Policy.Dhaliwal, a physician and lawyer, joined the United Nations Development Programme in 2008, and spearheaded the creation of the Global Commission on HIV and the Law. Her work focuses on HIV/AIDS research, care and human rights issues in countries like Africa and India. Dhaliwal outlined the UN’s 2030 agenda for sustainable development, which was adopted in 2015 by 193 member countries. “The Sustainable Development Goals are 17 interconnected goals with 169 targets,” Dhaliwal said. “The SDGs are much more narrowly focused … and the agenda is universal and indivisible.” Zero hunger, gender equality and clean water and sanitation are a few examples of the broad goals the organization hopes to achieve. While they are broad in language, the SDGs serve as a guiding framework for global cooperation, according to Dhaliwal. “[HIV] is one of the wicked problems of global health,” Dhaliwal said. “The global response has been remarkable on a number of fronts …  [demonstrating] the power of human rights and solidarity across governments.” O’Malley specifically  commented on the diseases’ impact on the LGBTQ community. “Why are queer people and queer issues linked to the SDGs?,” O’Malley said. “We need to understand how the SDG framework works for people with disabilities, queer people, migrants. Looking at these marginalized groups is a way to test whether this framework works for everybody.” Global health is rooted in a history of marginalization, he said. “The roots of global health are not altruistic. They were not about helping marginalized people or poor people,” O’Malley said. The event attracted both graduate and undergraduate students from all fields of study. Jake Anderson, a sophomore studying global health, attended the talk to hear about issues not discussed in the classroom. “We are future leaders in this profession,” Anderson said. “I think it’s interesting to see the progress that is trying to be made and to use that to see what it is I want to do with my life.” Sofia Gruskin, the director of the USC Institute for Global Health and a professor of preventative medicine and law, noted that both speakers were able to blend their passions with strategic thinking. “[The speakers] move policy and programs in the UN [and] work with governments and civil society around the world,” Gruskin said. “The world is a more inclusive and open place because of their work.”last_img read more